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    In our Bio a2 syllabus, you are meant to

    "outline glycolysis as phosphorylation of glucose and the subsequent splitting of hexose phosphate (6C) into two triose phosphate molecules...."

    In my notes, instead of "hexose phosphate" we have "fructose 1,6 biphosphate". I think they are the same thing but can anyone confirm this? Are we meant to call it "hexose phosphate" for the exam? Its OCR if that helps

    rosie
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    (Original post by crana)
    In our Bio a2 syllabus, you are meant to

    "outline glycolysis as phosphorylation of glucose and the subsequent splitting of hexose phosphate (6C) into two triose phosphate molecules...."

    In my notes, instead of "hexose phosphate" we have "fructose 1,6 biphosphate". I think they are the same thing but can anyone confirm this? Are we meant to call it "hexose phosphate" for the exam? Its OCR if that helps

    rosie
    Have packed up my notes now, so I can't tell you specifically, but I think hexose phosphate and F1,6BP are different. Hexose P is earlier in the glycolytic pathway I think; it is isomerised to fructose-6-phosphate, then phosphofructokinase (love that word!) adds another phosphate from ATP to make fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, which subsequently is broken into triose phosphate intermediates, eventually arriving at pyruvate. Hope that helps!

    (Original post by Helenia)
    Have packed up my notes now, so I can't tell you specifically, but I think hexose phosphate and F1,6BP are different. Hexose P is earlier in the glycolytic pathway I think; it is isomerised to fructose-6-phosphate, then phosphofructokinase (love that word!) adds another phosphate from ATP to make fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, which subsequently is broken into triose phosphate intermediates, eventually arriving at pyruvate. Hope that helps!
    Ah.. I see. Ta

    I find it hard when they use so little detail. We haven't been given the name of the "6 carbons with one phosphate" molecule - so this is hexose phosphate? Then there is no indication in our notes that any kind of isomerising takes place before the other phosphate group is added to give F1,6BP...

    Argh. I don't have the time or inclination to learn respiration in much more detail than I need right now. but its so hard when they give you such sketchy info.

    Rosie

    Oh while I think about it

    In our notes we have that in the Link reaction "Acetyl-CoA" is produced and then it says "Acetyl is carried by the CoA to the krebs cycle..."

    but I'm sure I looked it up somewhere and it's not actually called acetyl when it's just on its own (which would make sense, you don't have "methyl" apart from as a group attached to something else) but I cant remember quite what it was called. Acetate? I am not sure, that sounds wrong...

    any ideas?
    rosie

    ah don't worry I did manage to find it online.....on its own it's just acetic acid or acetate I think.

    Darn biology teachers....confusing me....its a good job I dont need to do too well

    rosie
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    (Original post by crana)
    ah don't worry I did manage to find it online.....on its own it's just acetic acid or acetate I think.

    Darn biology teachers....confusing me....its a good job I dont need to do too well

    rosie
    Yes, it's acetate - basically a 2 carbon unit with some oxygens on it

    As for the hexose phosphate thing - yes, it does undergo isomerisation, but if I remember rightly you don't need to know all the detailed steps of glycolysis, so don't worry about it; 2 phosphorylation reactions, breakdown into triose phosphate intermediates, dephosphorylations and oxidation, ending up with 2 pyruvate + 4 ATP (net 2, because 2 are used earlier on)

    (Original post by Helenia)
    Yes, it's acetate - basically a 2 carbon unit with some oxygens on it

    As for the hexose phosphate thing - yes, it does undergo isomerisation, but if I remember rightly you don't need to know all the detailed steps of glycolysis, so don't worry about it; 2 phosphorylation reactions, breakdown into triose phosphate intermediates, dephosphorylations and oxidation, ending up with 2 pyruvate + 4 ATP (net 2, because 2 are used earlier on)
    coolio
    ta
    (my biology teacher was really daft, and tehn she left to have a baby and we got an even more daft one )
 
 
 

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