B914 - British Baccalaureate Bill 2015

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Birchington
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B914 - British Baccalaureate Bill 2015, TSR Liberal Party
British Baccalaureate Bill 2015
A bill to reduce the education budget and improve examination standards in the UK.

BE IT ENACTED by the Queen’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

1: Definitions
BBB stands for British Baccalaureate Board.
MECT stands for Mathematics and English competency tests.
MFL will mean any language which has at least 20 million native speakers globally.
Period will be a lesson lasting 45 minutes.

2: Qualifications
1) GCSEs will last be certified in England, Wales and Northern Ireland in August 2018.
2) A-level and AS level qualifications may not be taken by people under the age of 21, from September 1st, 2020.
3) A new qualification is to be created, called the British Baccalaureate , which will replace A-levels as of September 2021.
4) A new qualification will be created, called the Mathematics and English Competency Test, which will replace GCSEs as of 2019.

3: British Baccalaureate
1) The British Baccalaureate will be administered by the 'British Baccalaureate Board', which will be established and funded by Central Government.
2) The structure of the Baccalaureate will be as per the table in the notes section.
3) The Baccalaureate will be a level 3 qualification and should only be taken by pupils over the age of 16.

3.1: Subject Composition
1) All schedule 1 subjects will be compulsory.
1.1) Students should receive 4 periods a week in teaching of each respective schedule 1 subject.
1.2) Students will choose to either take ICT or a MFL as their 4th schedule 1 subject, but may not take both as schedule 1.
2) All schedule 2 subjects are compulsory, unless taken under schedule 3.
2.1) Taking Physics, Biology or Chemistry will count as satisfying paragraph
2) of section 2.1.
2.2) Students taking schedule 2 subjects should receive 3 periods a week in teaching for each respective subject.
3) Students must take at least 4 schedule 3 subjects, with no upper limit, as long as this remains within meeting the limit set out in paragraph 6) of this section.
3.1) Students should receive 4 periods a week in teaching in each respective option they take from section 3.
4) Students may take as many schedule 4 subjects as they wish, as long as this remains within meeting the limit set out in paragraph 6) of this section.
4.1) Students should receive 3 periods a week in teaching in each respective option they take from schedule 4.
5) Students may take as many schedule 5 subjects as they wish, as long as this remains within meeting the limit set out in paragraph 6) of this section, and they have not taken the same subject under schedule 3.
5.1) Students should receive 2 periods a week in teaching in each respective option they take from schedule 5.
6) Students should take a minimum of 40 periods of lessons a week, and a maximum of 50 periods of lessons a week.

3.2: Examinations
1) Schedule 1 subjects will all have compulsory examinations, weighted accordingly;
1.1) English:
A) 20% oral test in January of the last year of key stage 5.
B) 30% written test in January of the last year of key stage 5.
C) 20% coursework prepared over the course of key stage 5.
D) 30% written test in June of the last year of key stage 5.
1.2) Mathematics:
A) 25% coursework prepared over the course of key stage 5.
B) 35% written test in January of the last year of key stage 5.
C) 40% written test in June of the last year of key stage 5.
1.3) Religious education:
A) 100% written test in June of the last year of key stage 5.
1.4) MFL 1:
A) 25% oral test in January of the last year of key stage 5.
B) 25% listening test in June of the last year of key stage 5.
C) 25% reading and writing test in January of the last year of key stage 5.
D) 25% reading and writing test in June of the last year of key stage 5.
1.5) ICT:
A) 33% coursework prepared over the course of key stage 5.
B) 33% written test in January of the last year of key stage 5.
C) 34% written test in June of the last year of key stage 5.
2) Schedule 2 subjects taken in schedule 2 will be graded by the teacher through continuous assessment throughout key stage 5, and the teacher will pass this grade on to the exam board.
3) The student will choose 2 schedule 3 subjects that they have studied in schedule 3 to take a written exam in.
3.1) These exams will take place in June of the last year of key stage 5, and will make up 50% of the overall grade achieved in each respective subject,
A) the other 50% will be made up of teacher-led continuous assessment, which will be passed on to the exam board.
4) The student will choose 1 schedule 3 subject that they have studied in schedule 3 to take an oral exam in.
4.1) This exam will take place in June of the last year of key stage 5, and will make up 50% of the overall grade achieved in this subject.
A) The other 50% will come from teacher-led continuous assessment, which will be passed on to the exam board.
B) A student cannot opt to take an oral test in the same subject that they took a written test in.
5) Any schedule 4 subjects taken will be examined by a written exam in June at the end of key stage 5.
5.1) The test will count towards 75% of the overall grade achieved in these subjects,
5.2) the remaining 25% will come from teacher-led continuous assessment, which will be passed on to the exam board.
6) Schedule 5 subjects taken in schedule 5 will not be examined, nor will they be subject to continuous assessment.

3.3: Certification
1) Each subject taken by a student other than schedule 5 subjects will be given an overall grade at the end of the course.
1.1) The grades will be percentages of total marks awarded, compared to the highest scoring individual who took the subject.
2) In addition, a 'Baccalaureate grade' will be given.
2.1) The Baccalaureate grade will consist of a percentage of total marks awarded across all exams and continuous assessment given, compared to the highest possible total score.

4: Mathematics and English competency
1) Between the ages of 14 and 16, all state funded schools should administer a Mathematics and English competency test.
2) The MECT will be administered by the BBB in a series of tests at the end of key stage 4.
3) The Mathematics test will be weighted:
3.1) 15% oral reasoning component.
3.2) 85% written test.
4) The English test will be weighted:
4.1) 25% oral presentation component;
4.2) 15% reading comprehension component;
4.3) 10% speaking and listening component;
4.4) 50% written examination.
5) The exams will be certified on the day they are taken, in August. The certificate will include the raw marks and percentage achieved by the candidate.
6) Students not achieving at least 60% in Mathematics and/or English will be required to resit the exams during their first year of compulsory KS5 education.

5: Exam Boards
1) A new exam board called the British Baccalaureate Board will be created after this bill gains Royal assent, and;
1.1) will be the only exam board permitted to administer the British Baccalaureate and the MECT.
2) This board will be 100% state owned, and the state is prohibited from selling shares in this board.

6: Short title, extent and enactment
1) This may be cited as the British Baccalaureate Bill 2015.
2) This bill extends to the whole of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
3) This bill shall come into force immediately following royal assent.


notesImage

This bill seeks to remove the largely pointless GCSEs and replace them with a simple Maths and English test, which we believe does the job better than adding on a lot of additional subjects that by the time the person has reached university, they will have largely forgotten.

It also seeks to encourage inter-disciplinary thinking and encourage students to be good at a range of subjects without making them specialise too early on.

We also believe that by making students take Maths and English further (unless they do an apprenticeship/vocational qualification), they will be better adapted and able to cope with day-to-day life.

Lastly, this bill standardises testing across the UK. ending the so-called 'race to the bottom'
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Katty3
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Nay. 16 year olds should be able to make a proper choice about the content of their education.

It would likely be far too much work for many students and not go into enough depth.

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cranbrook_aspie
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Nay.
1. The system is fine as it is, or was before Gove ****ed it up. GCSEs and A-Levels don't need replacing.
2. Why is philosophy not part of RE, and why is RE given more teaching time than more important subjects such as history and geography?
3. 'Teacher-led continuous assessment' is a seriously bad idea. Teachers have favourite students and some will naturally give them better grades.
4. How do you take an oral exam in art? Or physics? Or chemistry?
5. Why is politics not going to be taught under this?
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thehistorybore
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(Original post by cranbrook_aspie)
Nay.
1. The system is fine as it is, or was before Gove ****ed it up. GCSEs and A-Levels don't need replacing.
2. Why is philosophy not part of RE, and why is RE given more teaching time than more important subjects such as history and geography?
3. 'Teacher-led continuous assessment' is a seriously bad idea. Teachers have favourite students and some will naturally give them better grades.
4. How do you take an oral exam in art? Or physics? Or chemistry?
5. Why is politics not going to be taught under this?
Can I just express my disagreement with this assertion?

Also, aye, the mandatory exams should encourage students to encounter a broad range of subjects, especially the humanities.
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username1524603
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The examinations are based on arbitrary percentages with elements like oral testing in maths open to the subjectivity of the teacher; the timetabling is restrictive for pupils who do not want to study ICT, MFL, RE, Geography, History, and Philosophy; the 45 minute lessons do not give adequate time for a teacher to teach; and the wording of 3.3.1.1 implies a student who scores 80% in total will be rewarded 80%, but a student scoring 90% of the marks the first person scored will be given 90%. I believe there needs to be an exemption for private schools who want to continue with GCSEs, A-levels, and other exams; let the employer decide which qualification is more valuable.

thehistorybore Religious Education receives more teaching time than science; I believe science is a more valuable subject to learn than RE.
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Saracen's Fez
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I really like this, though I wish the Liberals had shown it to me as I would have loved to have done an SoI on this.

That offer is still on the table.
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SakuraCayla
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I'll take a more detailed look tomorrow, with all the work I have to do tonight, but I'm open to updates to the education system in general
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Aph
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(Original post by Katty3)
Nay. 16 year olds should be able to make a proper choice about the content of their education.

It would likely be far too much work for many students and not go into enough depth.

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They can. The BBac would only be 1 of many options students would still have:
1)IB
2)Pre-U
3)NVQ

This lets students actually study a wider range of topics, which encorages broad mindedness which ensuring a strong core curriculum.

(Original post by cranbrook_aspie)
Nay.
1. The system is fine as it is, or was before Gove ****ed it up. GCSEs and A-Levels don't need replacing.
GCSE's make students limit their life choises at ages 14 it also puts a lot of pressure onto students and since we all need to stay onto 18 now they are kinda pointless and expencive to administer.
2. Why is philosophy not part of RE, and why is RE given more teaching time than more important subjects such as history and geography?
the two are different and require different skills. The times however are up for debate. RE is about the study of religion, philosophy is more about logic
3. 'Teacher-led continuous assessment' is a seriously bad idea. Teachers have favourite students and some will naturally give them better grades.
it is more about students not being disadvantaged for a poor day.
4. How do you take an oral exam in art? Or physics? Or chemistry?
5. Why is politics not going to be taught under this?
quite easily....
As said subjects are up for debate.
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balanced
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Nay.
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TheDefiniteArticle
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Nay, this leaves far too many gaps to be filled in without expressly delegating the filling-in of those gaps. I'd also like to see PPE as a single subject from an early stage, and children should be taught more than maths and English according to a curriculum before the age of 16.

Finally a question: how does this save money when it increases the number of contact hours for A Level students to a minimum of 30 a week?
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Jammy Duel
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Nay, it wouldn't do as the subtitle suggests, and supposing it does it certainly wouldn't do it any better than reforming the current system.

And 15% of a trivial maths course tested orally... tell me, when was the last time you heard maths spoken generally, how do you test it? Would you be checking they know notation correctly, because that can be done more effectively in a written exam when it comes to efficiency, in fact, pretty much everything at that level is more efficiently done in a written exam (that isn't a waste of time at least)

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Aph
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(Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
Nay, this leaves far too many gaps to be filled in without expressly delegating the filling-in of those gaps. I'd also like to see PPE as a single subject from an early stage, and children should be taught more than maths and English according to a curriculum before the age of 16.

Finally a question: how does this save money when it increases the number of contact hours for A Level students to a minimum of 30 a week?
As far as I'm aware students studying PPE at uni study it as 3 different subjects? Also there will still be a curriculum in these subjects, it just won't be examined.
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TheDefiniteArticle
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(Original post by Aph)
As far as I'm aware students studying PPE at uni study it as 3 different subjects? Also there will still be a curriculum in these subjects, it just won't be examined.
I don't think it's wise for people to be able to study either economics or politics without studying philosophy. Economics cannot be applied without philosophy, and without philosophy, politics is just facts.
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Aph
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(Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
I don't think it's wise for people to be able to study either economics or politics without studying philosophy. Economics cannot be applied without philosophy, and without philosophy, politics is just facts.
I would tend to agree which is why philosophy is a core subject because it is very valuable. Politics and economics I don't feel should be core.
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Wellzi
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No.
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TheDefiniteArticle
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(Original post by Aph)
I would tend to agree which is why philosophy is a core subject because it is very valuable. Politics and economics I don't feel should be core.
It's also one which is going to be continually misunderstood, and tends to lack immediate practical application at an A Level standard.
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Jammy Duel
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Would anybody like to explain to me what "applied science" actually entails, because it strikes me as a watering down of the syllabus to remove the important bits.
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
It's also one which is going to be continually misunderstood, and tends to lack immediate practical application at an A Level standard.
Philosophy is love, philosophy is life.
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Andy98
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I don't like the way you arranged the subjects.
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TheDefiniteArticle
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
Philosophy is love, philosophy is life.
Philosophy is like an onion. It has layers.
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