Psychological theories underpinning therapeutic interventions. HELP!!

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Rachelb4444
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#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
Hello, I am a 3rd year undergraduate degree student studying mental health nursing. I am currently doing a module critically evaluating a therapeutic intervention. I have chosen SFBT, so I have been exploring the theory behind it and where it came from and am getting increasingly confused as it comes from a range of people over time and has changed each time so it's hard to reference who came up with what. So far (correct me if I'm wrong) I have Milton Erickson, who i can't find a reference for, who came up with loads of stuff, but the bit that's relevant to SFBT is the idea of 'utilization' which basically means recognition that each client is unique and as such exploration/utilization of their own cognitions, behaviours and feelings can help find solutions to their problems. (This was different to the more paternalistic Freudian approaches that were popular then, where the therapist was very much the expert.) This led to the MRI brief strategic therapy which took forward the idea of utilization and stressed the importance of social reinforcement on the development of problems. De Shazer (SFBT co-founder) having worked alongside MRI peeps, had background in brief therapy and set up the Milwaukee Brief Family Therapy Centre, where, over time it became apparent that focusing on the 'problem' was not as effective as solution focused work, and the clearer the goal the more like a client is to achieve it. And this evolved into current solution focused therapy which is strengths based and future focused, dealing with current problems and goals, rather than exploring past traumas.

That is very long winded and muddled so apologies if it doesn't read nicely. I would very much appreciate any pointers on areas where I am wrong/right, anything I haven't already found in the literature. Obviously, I am going to go into the principles of SFBT more than that in the actual essay, it's just getting the order of the theories which contributed to it and understanding them properly.
Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
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Interrobang
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#2
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#2
(Original post by Rachelb4444)
Hello, I am a 3rd year undergraduate degree student studying mental health nursing. I am currently doing a module critically evaluating a therapeutic intervention. I have chosen SFBT, so I have been exploring the theory behind it and where it came from and am getting increasingly confused as it comes from a range of people over time and has changed each time so it's hard to reference who came up with what. So far (correct me if I'm wrong) I have Milton Erickson, who i can't find a reference for, who came up with loads of stuff, but the bit that's relevant to SFBT is the idea of 'utilization' which basically means recognition that each client is unique and as such exploration/utilization of their own cognitions, behaviours and feelings can help find solutions to their problems. (This was different to the more paternalistic Freudian approaches that were popular then, where the therapist was very much the expert.) This led to the MRI brief strategic therapy which took forward the idea of utilization and stressed the importance of social reinforcement on the development of problems. De Shazer (SFBT co-founder) having worked alongside MRI peeps, had background in brief therapy and set up the Milwaukee Brief Family Therapy Centre, where, over time it became apparent that focusing on the 'problem' was not as effective as solution focused work, and the clearer the goal the more like a client is to achieve it. And this evolved into current solution focused therapy which is strengths based and future focused, dealing with current problems and goals, rather than exploring past traumas.

That is very long winded and muddled so apologies if it doesn't read nicely. I would very much appreciate any pointers on areas where I am wrong/right, anything I haven't already found in the literature. Obviously, I am going to go into the principles of SFBT more than that in the actual essay, it's just getting the order of the theories which contributed to it and understanding them properly.
Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
You've got the basis of it it's based on positive psychology too from what I can remember but my assignment on it is on my computer at home
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Rachelb4444
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#3
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#3
Thanks so much for your reply. It's very helpful to know I've not missed anything glaringly obvious. I'll look up positive psychology and get a grip of where that fits in.
Thanks again!
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