skeptical_john
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I am doing a placement in year 6 primary school. We came on to maths (supposedly my specialist subject).

The kids were given these questions:

sequence of 1, 3, 6, 10

Find the next in the sequence and then find the formula.

I managed it after some working out but this seemed insanely advanced for 11 year olds? Or is this the norm.

A couple of the sequences were a little easier such as 3,5,7,9 etc others were also hard.

Another being 0,2,6,12.
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Awais_
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(Original post by skeptical_john)
I am doing a placement in year 6 primary school. We came on to maths (supposedly my specialist subject).

The kids were given these questions:

sequence of 1, 3, 6, 10

Find the next in the sequence and then find the formula.

I managed it after some working out but this seemed insanely advanced for 11 year olds? Or is this the norm.

A couple of the sequences were a little easier such as 3,5,7,9 etc others were also hard.

Another being 0,2,6,12.
Not really advanced? I think it's pretty easy and OK for them.
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Big Gibb
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(Original post by skeptical_john)
I am doing a placement in year 6 primary school. We came on to maths (supposedly my specialist subject).

The kids were given these questions:

sequence of 1, 3, 6, 10

Find the next in the sequence and then find the formula.

I managed it after some working out but this seemed insanely advanced for 11 year olds? Or is this the norm.

A couple of the sequences were a little easier such as 3,5,7,9 etc others were also hard.

Another being 0,2,6,12.
While it's easy to see the pattern for both sequences, the nth term (i.e. the formula of the sequence) would be quadratic which is covered at GCSE
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skeptical_john
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(Original post by Awais_)
Not really advanced? I think it's pretty easy and OK for them.
(Original post by Big Gibb)
While it's easy to see the pattern for both sequences, the nth term (i.e. the formula of the sequence) would be quadratic which is covered at GCSE
I have actually made these seem a bit easier than they were presented (as real word problems)

For instance the question was:

If everybody shook each others hand in a group of 4 how many would this be. Then for 5 and 6.

The other was about the number of people sitting at a table which got bigger everytime.

A bit more research and you could get these on key stage 3 so its perhaps not as shocking as I thought. I think the problem lies with more with how they were worded. wished I'd kept one for reference.
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Big Gibb
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(Original post by skeptical_john)
I have actually made these seem a bit easier than they were presented (as real word problems)

For instance the question was:

If everybody shook each others hand in a group of 4 how many would this be. Then for 5 and 6.

The other was about the number of people sitting at a table which got bigger everytime.

A bit more research and you could get these on key stage 3 so its perhaps not as shocking as I thought. I think the problem lies with more with how they were worded. wished I'd kept one for reference.
I would say that the word problems you mentioned above are more suitable for year 6
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Kvothe the Arcane
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Not really. I did such things at primary school.

Even basic algebra was covered though I did not realise.

Instead of saying x+7=10, they'd say 7+\square =10 or give word problems about mystery amounts of money.
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StrangeBanana
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(Original post by skeptical_john)
I am doing a placement in year 6 primary school. We came on to maths (supposedly my specialist subject).

The kids were given these questions:

sequence of 1, 3, 6, 10

Find the next in the sequence and then find the formula.

I managed it after some working out but this seemed insanely advanced for 11 year olds? Or is this the norm.

A couple of the sequences were a little easier such as 3,5,7,9 etc others were also hard.

Another being 0,2,6,12.
A bright 11 year old could definitely get it.
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Smaug123
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(Original post by skeptical_john)
I am doing a placement in year 6 primary school. We came on to maths (supposedly my specialist subject).

The kids were given these questions:

sequence of 1, 3, 6, 10

Find the next in the sequence and then find the formula.

I managed it after some working out but this seemed insanely advanced for 11 year olds? Or is this the norm.

A couple of the sequences were a little easier such as 3,5,7,9 etc others were also hard.

Another being 0,2,6,12.
There is a class of problem which is only difficult if you tell the pupil it's difficult. This is one such example. Humans *excel* at finding patterns, so I think it's entirely reasonable for a primary school student to give the answer "They're going up by one more each time, so you get 15 and then 21, then the next will be plus 7, and the next plus 8…" which is a perfectly good recursive formula, corresponding in symbols to f(n) = f(n-1) + n and f(1) = 1.
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