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    (Original post by crana)
    No, it shouldn't be higher if only people who need it have the appropriate amount of time. The extra time is to COMPENSATE for difficulties the candidate may have, so that the mark he/she gets is comparable to what he/she would have got if he/she did not have a disability. So it should not affect the scaling. yes, the system is not perfect, but extra-time candidates are still a minority and I highly doubt the grade scaling would be affected significantly by them, even though the system is imperfect.

    All the same extra time should NOT be allowed
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    (Original post by Wise Man)
    Those people should sit seperate exams not the normal ones. These other exams would give them more time, whilst not allowing them to sit the normal exams. This way there mark would not affect the scaling of grades...which will be higher if people get extra time
    but the idea is that the grade they get with extra time is a true reflection of their ability... if they had normal time the scaling of the grades will be lower. it's not like people get extra time for no reason, they have to have tests and stuff for dyslexia/dyspraxia etc.

    by giving people completely seperate exams for things like that you are on deangerous territory by suggesting their qualifications are of a lesser value. it's like having handicaps in horse racing- it makes things more fair not less fair.

    lou xxx
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    (Original post by Wise Man)
    All the same extra time should NOT be allowed
    you have no basis for your argument here.

    lou xxx

    (Original post by Wise Man)
    All the same extra time should NOT be allowed
    Er, would you like to provide any kind of reason that makes sense for stating this?

    rosie

    Sorry, Lou, we keep cross postimg!

    (Original post by Wise Man)
    Most of the time people who have extra time are thick, dumb and not very clever, why prolong the agony for them?? Also people who have extra time finish before people on normal time, why give them extra?? - Do the exam board feel forry for them??
    Right......
    I am not even sure if you are just trying to wind me up, because your argument is so stupid. Would you like a serious reply, or are you just messing around?

    rosie
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    (Original post by crana)
    Right......
    I am not even sure if you are just trying to wind me up, because your argument is so stupid. Would you like a serious reply, or are you just messing around?

    rosie

    No iam being perfectly serious
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    (Original post by crana)
    Sorry, Lou, we keep cross postimg!
    lol, it's ok... might help if there's 2 of us *highly unlikely tho*

    (Original post by Wise Man)
    Most of the time people who have extra time are thick, dumb and not very clever, why prolong the agony for them?? Also people who have extra time finish before people on normal time, why give them extra?? - Do the exam board feel forry for them??
    do you know anything about dyslexia? cos i do and i know that people with things like dyslexia are often very intelligent but their brain is not very good at processing words and letters so it slows down their reading and often writing. that is why they get extra time, they atre actually often really bright and have excellent memories.

    next time argue about something you have a basic knowledge of.

    lou xxx
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    (Original post by crana)
    The extra time is to COMPENSATE for difficulties the candidate may have, so that the mark he/she gets is comparable to what he/she would have got if he/she did not have a disability. So it should not affect the scaling.
    beat me to it..

    i've had lots of very pissed off people in my 6th form when i was first given extra time, saying i didn't "need" it.

    admittedly, i got top GCSE grades without it (whoops..i suppose i must be outside the 'Wise Man's "most" people who are 'thick, dumb and not very clever' :rolleyes: )

    ..but the point of extra time isn't to give it to people who would do badly without it (otherwise the whole system would become ludicrous & everyone would get the same grade!)..but to try & compensate - the only problem being is that it's very hard to justify how much a disability has effected someone & how well you would do without it..
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    (Original post by Wise Man)
    Most of the time people who have extra time are thick, dumb and not very clever, why prolong the agony for them?? Also people who have extra time finish before people on normal time, why give them extra?? - Do the exam board feel forry for them??
    Before you make anymore inane, unresearched points, I would just like to point out that most of the people with dyslexia are far more clever than even you. They are far from thick or dumb, and could beat you in an exam anyday. They just don't write as fast, or read as well.
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    (Original post by glance)
    Before you make anymore inane, unresearched points, I would just like to point out that most of the people with dyslexia are far more clever than even you.
    & i would like to point out that not everyone who has extra time is dyslexic

    (Original post by Wise Man)
    No iam being perfectly serious
    In that case:

    Having extra time has nothing to do with intelligence. Some not very clever people have extra time. Some complete geniuses also have extra time. Extra time is to do with a DISABILITY, not to do with intelligence.

    However, (I am not sure about this?) an extremely clever person might be able to "hide" a condition like dyslexia better - like, if they didn't have dyslexia they would be getting top marks in an exam, but with dyslexia they are getting middling marks, so it's not thought they have any kind of "problem".

    For example my boyfriend's school told him he could not have dyslexia as he had got a C in GCSE English, but he was later diagnosed as dyslexic.

    Extra time is also provided for a multitude of different reasons apart from dyslexia. I get extra time because I have a physical disability that makes writing slower and painful for me so I need to write slower, have rests, write with my non-dominant hand etc in exams which takes longer.

    As for people not always needing the extra time:
    1) Sometimes people (with a disability or not) finish exams early. Maybe they couldn't do several questions and just left them, or maybe they found the paper easy and finished quickly. This happens all the time to people who don't get extra time, so why should it never happen to people who do get extra time?

    2) Some people, like me, have a condition that varies from day to day. If I feel I haven't needed all the extra time and I have written about the same as a "normal" person, I don't TAKE the extra time even if I could use it to go through and check more answers etc, because I see that as cheating.

    Rosie

    (Original post by Elles)
    beat me to it..

    i've had lots of very pissed off people in my 6th form when i was first given extra time, saying i didn't "need" it.

    admittedly, i got top GCSE grades without it (whoops..i suppose i must be outside the 'Wise Man's "most" people who are 'thick, dumb and not very clever' :rolleyes: )

    ..but the point of extra time isn't to give it to people who would do badly without it (otherwise the whole system would become ludicrous & everyone would get the same grade!)..but to try & compensate - the only problem being is that it's very hard to justify how much a disability has effected someone & how well you would do without it..
    I did well in my GCSEs too without extra time, but I didn't start getting problems until after my GCSEs even though its something you have from birth. Then when I couldn't write as well I would do much worse in class tests etc because I couldn't write down my answers etc fast enough.

    Rosie
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    (Original post by Elles)
    & i would like to point out that not everyone who has extra time is dyslexic
    True, true.
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    Although I'm not in favor of extra-time I think it will stay, but what does frustrate me is when dislexics and dispraxics(sp) get to use a computer and get 25% extra time. I thought the computer compensated for them being slow at writing or reading. In an english exam where there is a considerable amount of writing it is a great advantage if you can touch type on a laptop.

    (Original post by Louise_1988)
    Although I'm not in favor of extra-time I think it will stay, but what does frustrate me is when dislexics and dispraxics(sp) get to use a computer and get 25% extra time. I thought the computer compensated for them being slow at writing or reading. In an english exam where there is a considerable amount of writing it is a great advantage if you can touch type on a laptop.
    Just out of interest, how do you think using a computer to type your answers helps you to read better...?

    A few points:

    Dyspraxic people may well have problems typing accurately due to their coordination problems.

    The question paper still has to be read; the answers you have typed still have to be read through to check over; dyslexic people often struggle with spelling and grammar etc (often which the computer spellcheck will not pick up, or they are not allowed to use a spellchecker anyway) so they may need extra time to think how to spell a word or lay out a sentence, and more time to check over their work looking for errors like that.......etc........etc.....
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    (Original post by crana)
    Just out of interest, how do you think using a computer to type your answers helps you to read better...?

    A few points:

    Dyspraxic people may well have problems typing accurately due to their coordination problems.

    The question paper still has to be read; the answers you have typed still have to be read through to check over; dyslexic people often struggle with spelling and grammar etc (often which the computer spellcheck will not pick up, or they are not allowed to use a spellchecker anyway) so they may need extra time to think how to spell a word or lay out a sentence, and more time to check over their work looking for errors like that.......etc........etc.....
    Coming from a dispraxic family I can say that with practice the problems they may encounter whilst typing are no greater than someon else may have when writing, people are ofen inacurate when writing as well. People who do have learning difficulties should be taught more to overcome these difficulties, as hard as it may be in many circumstances, not to just accept it. My sister could barely write when she was 7 but after 5 years of hard work she could finally write a reasonably comprehendable essay.
    If they encounter the same problems when using a computor as when writing then why give them the advantage of a computor? In an exam such as religious studies the amount of reading was minimal, 1 line per question 20 questions. There was no extrended reading questions so if someone was so to read this wouldn't have affected them.
    Another point is that in the future, in the workplace people are much less likely to give someone extra consideration because they have a learning difficulty. People will not be so sympathetic because you are dispraxic, a large amount of the populartion do not even know what dispraxia is, so people with learning difficulties need to be taught to overcome their problem, as this will help them much more in later life than having extra time all through their childhood.

    (Original post by Louise_1988)
    Coming from a dispraxic family I can say that with practice the problems they may encounter whilst typing are no greater than someon else may have when writing, people are ofen inacurate when writing as well. People who do have learning difficulties should be taught more to overcome these difficulties, as hard as it may be in many circumstances, not to just accept it. My sister could barely write when she was 7 but after 5 years of hard work she could finally write a reasonably comprehendable essay.
    If they encounter the same problems when using a computor as when writing then why give them the advantage of a computor? In an exam such as religious studies the amount of reading was minimal, 1 line per question 20 questions. There was no extrended reading questions so if someone was so to read this wouldn't have affected them.
    Another point is that in the future, in the workplace people are much less likely to give someone extra consideration because they have a learning difficulty. People will not be so sympathetic because you are dispraxic, a large amount of the populartion do not even know what dispraxia is, so people with learning difficulties need to be taught to overcome their problem, as this will help them much more in later life than having extra time all through their childhood.
    1) Your family may be dyspraxic (it's spelt with a y, by the way) but this doesnt mean that ALL dyspraxic people have exactly the same problems as the dyspraxic members of your family do.

    2) I agree people should be helped to overcome difficulties they may have, but in many cases you can't overcome dyslexia or dyspraxia to the level that you are "normal", no matter how hard you try

    3) Using a computer does have advantages (e.g. for those with very illegible handwriting) even though it may not completely compensate for people's difficulties

    4) The person still has to read over and check their answers, even if there is not much reading on the exam paper.

    5) Like I said, many people cannot completely overcome their difficulties. Sure, they should be helped, but if they can't be helped to read/write as well as a non-dyslexic person (etc) they won't be able to get the qualifications at the grades they would get otherwise. So their job prospects will be reduced in that regard. Plus, which jobs are like exams? If a person is severely dyslexic, he/she may choose jobs that play to his/her strengths more, or which can be adapted to help him/her. This is not really an option when taking GCSEs, for example. Everyone has to take English, etc.

    Rosie
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    (Original post by glance)
    They are far from thick or dumb, and could beat you in an exam anyday.

    Bring on the challenge i'd whip them anyday!
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    (Original post by Wise Man)
    Bring on the challenge i'd whip them anyday!
    omg you must be kidding... you've got to know that someone with dylexia/dyspraxia/asperges etc aren't any less intelligent? i know my bf is way more clever than me, he learns stuff so quickly + i'm really envious, but he finds it hard to put down in words and is much better at telling people stuff and as a result despite extra time his exam grades still don't really do him justice.

    lou xxx
 
 
 
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