Why is stress a property of a material rather than a property of an object?

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therealbatman365
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This was in my physics practical handbook, I'm trying to pull out different explanations but it's all muddled. I know what stress and strain are but how is this applied to the question?
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TSR Jessica
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Sorry you've not had any responses about this. Are you sure you’ve posted in the right place? Posting in the specific Study Help forum should help get responses.

I'm going to quote in Tank Girl now so she can move your thread to the right place if it's needed. :yy:

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rayquaza17
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Moved to physics.
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Rhudspeth
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stress is a property of a material as its the type of bonds within the material that affect its properties whilst an object is something made from a material
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Flame Alchemist
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(Original post by therealbatman365)
This was in my physics practical handbook, I'm trying to pull out different explanations but it's all muddled. I know what stress and strain are but how is this applied to the question?
That's quite an unusual question... neither tensile stress nor strain are inherent properties of a material, with the former being dimensionally equivalent to exerted pressure and the latter being just a measure of the resultant deformation.

I'm not entirely sure what this question is calling for, but perhaps it's asking as to why the resultant strain depends on the material for a given stress? As in, the Young's modulus of a material.
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