tomlfc
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"marc is often frustrated and angry, but most of the time he keeps his feelings under control. one day, during a meeting at work, marc stormed out of the room and kicked the drinks machine so hard that the glass screen broke. suggest how a behaviourist psychologist might explain violent behaviour such as that shown by marc." (2 marks)

i have a mock exam tomorrow and behaviourism is on it, how would i answer this or something similar if it came up?
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rileystringer1
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(Original post by tomlfc)
"marc is often frustrated and angry, but most of the time he keeps his feelings under control. one day, during a meeting at work, marc stormed out of the room and kicked the drinks machine so hard that the glass screen broke. suggest how a behaviourist psychologist might explain violent behaviour such as that shown by marc." (2 marks)

i have a mock exam tomorrow and behaviourism is on it, how would i answer this or something similar if it came up?
I believe behaviourist psychology is the same as learning psychology

I would use social learning theory to explain his behaviour, are you familiar with the theory?

It suggests we learn behaviour by observing and imitating that of people who act as role models, who are normally successful, high status and similar to us i.e. same sex. So for example, he may have observed someone exhibit aggressive behaviour like the behaviour he displayed, and they may have been rewarded for it i.e. with attention which vicariously reinforces the behaviour in him, making it more likely he will repeat it.

However, vicarious reinforcement isn't always necessary for observed behaviour to be imitated, as demonstrated by Bandura Ross and Ross' bobo doll experiment (1961) where boys imitated 25.8 aggressive acts on average after observing an aggressive model hit a bobo doll where the model was the same sex, compared to 12.4 on average when the model was female, showing similarity and identification is much more important than vicarious reinforcement.

Hope that helps, let me know if you need anything else
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Findlay6
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Bandura's study (Bobo doll) is first that comes to mind but you may know others. I haven't looked at this topic in a while so this is basic stuff.

Think role models, vicarious learning, he's had no negative reinforcement, Abusive parents which shows this behaviour is "acceptable/normal"

Then you can critic against biological model - may be hormonal (testosterone) or he may have an unknown condition. Anderson mentioned that aggression rises in hot weather.

You can link/critic this to cognitive approach too.

2 marks though, they're looking for facts/key terms - AO1
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_Sinnie_
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I'm not really answering your question, as this isn't what a 2 mark AS question is actually getting at, its more of a general musing. I just think it's an interesting example to use when they just want facts and key words in the answer.

The real crux of that scenario from a behavioural perspective is that while Marc appears to have a high state/trait of anger, violent outbursts are not common. Therefore there must have been a particular event, or set of events, occuring which led him to alter his response to his anger. Biology or previous experiences may explain why he tends to be angry or frustrated, but the reason for the alteration in behaviour is likely to be time proximal triggers - thus not a standard 'Marc learned the behaviour elsewhere and was either not punished for showing it himself or was reinforced for showing it'
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rileystringer1
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(Original post by Findlay6)
Bandura's study (Bobo doll) is first that comes to mind but you may know others. I haven't looked at this topic in a while so this is basic stuff.

Think role models, vicarious learning, he's had no *negative reinforcement, Abusive parents which shows this behaviour is "acceptable/normal"

Then you can critic against biological model - may be hormonal (testosterone) or he may have an unknown condition. Anderson mentioned that aggression rises in hot weather.

You can link/critic this to cognitive approach too.

2 marks though, they're looking for facts/key terms - AO1
*punishment - negative reinforcement would make it more likely for him to repeat the behaviour.
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