Asad_2015
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Hey is it just using N=1,n=k and n=k+1, and then proving it works. Is that all there is to proof by induction or is there more to know?
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Asad_2015)
Hey is it just using N=1,n=k and n=k+1, and then proving it works. Is that all there is to proof by induction or is there more to know?
For FP1 in Edexcel, there are distinct types of problems that they ask you to prove by induction (eg show that something is always divisible by some number, or the nth term of a sequence, something to do with matrices etc.

You show that it's true for the base case (usually n=1), assume that it's true for k and then prove it for k+1. (The way this works is that you've proved that it works for 1, and that if it works for k then it works for k+1 so you know it works for 2, use that to show that it works for 3 and so on ad infinitum).

Best thing to do is familiarise yourself with it by practicing.
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B_9710
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Proof by induction for FP1 I think is limited to series, sequences and divisibility. You should just practice questions on it if you understand the concept.
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