Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 822)
    haha thanks and last question (i promise lol), can people visit you? i mean like from home can people come to your dorm and see you there?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    No worries you'll have to check the accommodation handbook or whatever it's called. It should outline the policy that they have on guests, overnight or otherwise.

    At my university for example, it was fine for people to visit (but not stay overnight) without informing the people in charge. If someone else that wasn't from the university wanted to stay overnight though, they would have to obtain permission from the people in charge, though the people I know just did it anyway without asking.

    At another university I've heard of having to give in some form of ID just to enter someone else's accommodation when you're visiting. Yikes.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SeanFM)
    No worries you'll have to check the accommodation handbook or whatever it's called. It should outline the policy that they have on guests, overnight or otherwise.

    At my university for example, it was fine for people to visit (but not stay overnight) without informing the people in charge. If someone else that wasn't from the university wanted to stay overnight though, they would have to obtain permission from the people in charge, though the people I know just did it anyway without asking.

    At another university I've heard of having to give in some form of ID just to enter someone else's accommodation when you're visiting. Yikes.

    i didnt know that, i thought it was simply going in.

    anyways thank you so much for all your help!


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 822)
    thanks for replying

    how is physics? im thinking of doing maybe physics or computer science.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    So far it's been good. I'm not really sure what to say.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by morgan8002)
    So far it's been good. I'm not really sure what to say.
    well how was it when you started? was it difficult?

    whats the workload like?

    do you enjoy it?

    finally how much spare time do you have?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    1- is uni how you expected it to be?
    Yeah, pretty much. I must say the work is a lot easier than I imagined, but it is only the second term .

    2- are the people at uni and around uni like they are in school (silly and goofy)? or are they actually mature?
    So-so, some are silly and some are mature. I think you will find people to yourself if that is what you are asking, if you want a silly group of friends, they are there, but so are mature people.

    3- what do you do for fun in your spare time?
    Watch TV ect with the flat . Don't really go out much, its expensive, cold and I don't enjoy it as much as i may have thought before coming.

    4- what course are you doing? and how many people are in your class?
    Accounting and Finance. About 150 in a lecture, and 20 in a tutorial. @ Lancaster University

    5- how do you get along with people? and how easy is it to talk to other people?
    Very easy. Everyone is at least approachable.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 822)
    well how was it when you started? was it difficult?

    whats the workload like?

    do you enjoy it?

    finally how much spare time do you have?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    When I started I was just doing foundations(dimensional analysis, thermodynamics, waves and optics) and classical mechanics and special relativity. In foundations I knew everything to a basic level, but it was covered in much much more detail than at A-level and it's been my hardest module to keep up with so far(I've mostly done maths modules). In classical mechanics and special relativity I knew everything(I self-studied the later mechanics modules at A-level) covered in the first 20 I think lectures(until special relativity started) and the lectures were really slow so I ended up skipping most of them until special relativity. After that it got a lot tougher but still easier than foundations.

    I don't think I can give an accurate idea of the workload of a physics student. I do all of the same lectures and assignments as the physics students do, with a few minor differences on one set, with the exception of their maths for physicist module(I have lots of maths modules too), but the physics students also have a lot of timetabled lab sessions so it's hard to compare.

    Yes I enjoy it a lot. At the moment it's all introduction to the new modules, but it's good mid term when it's more challenging.

    It depends on the number of assignments. The most I've had is 8 in a week including some long ones and I had very little free time if at all, but for example now I've only got 6 very easy assignments due in the next week and they're mostly finished so I'll have all weekend and the evenings for the first half of next week free(with some time dedicated to reading lecture notes and textbooks etc.)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by morgan8002)
    When I started I was just doing foundations(dimensional analysis, thermodynamics, waves and optics) and classical mechanics and special relativity. In foundations I knew everything to a basic level, but it was covered in much much more detail than at A-level and it's been my hardest module to keep up with so far(I've mostly done maths modules). In classical mechanics and special relativity I knew everything(I self-studied the later mechanics modules at A-level) covered in the first 20 I think lectures(until special relativity started) and the lectures were really slow so I ended up skipping most of them until special relativity. After that it got a lot tougher but still easier than foundations.

    I don't think I can give an accurate idea of the workload of a physics student. I do all of the same lectures and assignments as the physics students do, with a few minor differences on one set, with the exception of their maths for physicist module(I have lots of maths modules too), but the physics students also have a lot of timetabled lab sessions so it's hard to compare.

    Yes I enjoy it a lot. At the moment it's all introduction to the new modules, but it's good mid term when it's more challenging.

    It depends on the number of assignments. The most I've had is 8 in a week including some long ones and I had very little free time if at all, but for example now I've only got 6 very easy assignments due in the next week and they're mostly finished so I'll have all weekend and the evenings for the first half of next week free(with some time dedicated to reading lecture notes and textbooks etc.)
    wow that sounds hectic lol. i just got one more question.

    how much maths is needed for the physics modules?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 822)
    wow that sounds hectic lol. i just got one more question.

    how much maths is needed for the physics modules?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    So far, the physics modules have required complex numbers, calculus(including for example infinitesimals, solution of linear ODEs with constant coefficients, partial differentiation), abstract knowledge of vectors(dot and cross product etc.), double angle formulae, small angle approximations. I might have missed some stuff. You'll also have maths modules which will teach this and extra stuff(other aspects of vectors, matrices, Taylor series etc.), but I'm not sure of the extent of that.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by morgan8002)
    So far, the physics modules have required complex numbers, calculus(including for example infinitesimals, solution of linear ODEs with constant coefficients, partial differentiation), abstract knowledge of vectors(dot and cross product etc.), double angle formulae, small angle approximations. I might have missed some stuff. You'll also have maths modules which will teach this and extra stuff(other aspects of vectors, matrices, Taylor series etc.), but I'm not sure of the extent of that.
    ahh okay... thanks for all your help


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    what happens when you dont mind going out, but you're not really a clubbing type?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    1. Pretty much. More cliquey than I thought it would be, but I think that's just my uni.

    2. Depends where you are. Lectures / tutorials etc people tend to behave themselves. Outside that, I'd say students on the whole are pretty immature.

    3. Photography, relax with boyfriend, watch crap on Netflix, etc.

    4. Medicine. 150-odd?

    5. Fine. On the whole people are friendly, even if I do find the stereotypical 'student life' to be a bit mundane.

    At St Andrews.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TattyBoJangles)
    1. Pretty much. More cliquey than I thought it would be, but I think that's just my uni.
    what do you mean by this?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 822)
    what do you mean by this?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    It's kind of self-explanatory really After the first few weeks I found people tended to split off into their little groups and socialise within them.
    Doesn't entirely bother me, mind. And I think it might be more my uni / course than anything as my boyfriend didn't have the same experience at his uni).
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Break up or unrequited love?
    Useful resources
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.