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    Hi guys, I'm not sure if I posted this in the right place so I apologise in advance.

    I'm a first year med and I'm in a panicky mode at the moment. I kind of cruised past the first semester without learning the network of nerves and the muscles but now this knowledge is just the basics of EVERYTHING we're doing in semester 2 so I'll never understand anything this semester if I don't understand these two things. Part of this is my fault due to laziness but partly due to my anatomy teachers who were stuck up snobby surgeons who ridicule you for asking questions.

    I would appreciate any guidance towards how I can go about learning ALL the branches of nerves and what they innervate etc as well as the muscles. Are there any resources such as websites/youtube vids?

    Thank you so much in advance!!
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    (Original post by Butternuts96)
    Hi guys, I'm not sure if I posted this in the right place so I apologise in advance.

    I'm a first year med and I'm in a panicky mode at the moment. I kind of cruised past the first semester without learning the network of nerves and the muscles but now this knowledge is just the basics of EVERYTHING we're doing in semester 2 so I'll never understand anything this semester if I don't understand these two things. Part of this is my fault due to laziness but partly due to my anatomy teachers who were stuck up snobby surgeons who ridicule you for asking questions.

    I would appreciate any guidance towards how I can go about learning ALL the branches of nerves and what they innervate etc as well as the muscles. Are there any resources such as websites/youtube vids?

    Thank you so much in advance!!
    teach me anatomy is a great website for anatomy, can be a bit wordy but it gets to the point.
    in terms of the dermatomes and myotomes, its good if you print out a body and draw them on it!
    for muscles learn them in compartments (e.g. abductor/medial compartment of the thigh is innervated by the obturator nerve) as this helps you remember their function, location and inneravtion easily. try to learn muscles from superificial to deep (generally easier) and note that most muscles (especially in the arms and legs) are named due to location and function, so that should be easy!

    GRAYS ANATOMY FLASH CARDS AND NETTERS ANATOMY COLOURING BOOK ARE GREAT REVISION RESOURCES!
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    (Original post by Butternuts96)
    Hi guys, I'm not sure if I posted this in the right place so I apologise in advance.

    I'm a first year med and I'm in a panicky mode at the moment. I kind of cruised past the first semester without learning the network of nerves and the muscles but now this knowledge is just the basics of EVERYTHING we're doing in semester 2 so I'll never understand anything this semester if I don't understand these two things. Part of this is my fault due to laziness but partly due to my anatomy teachers who were stuck up snobby surgeons who ridicule you for asking questions.

    I would appreciate any guidance towards how I can go about learning ALL the branches of nerves and what they innervate etc as well as the muscles. Are there any resources such as websites/youtube vids?

    Thank you so much in advance!!
    Does your uni have an e-learning environment where you can access study material e.g lectures that has been uploaded by teachers etc.? This may be really helpful, as well as also asking other medical students if you can borrow their notes/having study sessions with them to help catch up
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    Uh oh - you are going to need a thicker skin and to take a bit more responsibility for your education if you're to get the most out of your clinical placements.

    I found anatomy very difficult when I started medical school precisely because I tried to learn "ALL the branches of nerves and what they innervate etc as well as the muscles". In reality, this is very difficult, if not impossible. Instead, you need to work out what is a) clinically relevant and/or b) is relevant to one of the many nice anatomical "stories" (these are often not clinically relevant at all but they're part of anatomical lore so we learn them), like the boundaries of the femoral triangle or the innervation of the muscles that insert into the pes anserinus...

    This is hard to do without guidance, hence the importance of listening to your anatomy demonstrators/lecturers. It is tough to learn anatomy by yourself.

    My thoughts would be to try and fill the gaps as you go along rather than setting out to learn all the first semester material in a way that is completely divorced from the second semester material. I don't know how your course is organised but, if there is a lecture tomorrow on disorders of the spine, tonight is your opportunity to learn your vertebrae, pyramidal, and extrapyramidal tracts. I'd also invest in a copy of Harold Ellis' "Clinical Anatomy". It is still too detailed for most undergraduates but is much less detailed than Gray's Anatomy for Students and Moore's Clinically Orientated Anatomy.

    There will be lots of students in the same position as you - whether because they didn't work hard or are struggling with the content - so there is plenty of time to catch up if you act now.
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    The Essential Anatomy 5 app is very good as well. You can interactively view the different nerves and muscles, its a little pricey (£12 I believe), but I think its well worth it
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    (Original post by Sarasaurus)
    The Essential Anatomy 5 app is very good as well. You can interactively view the different nerves and muscles, its a little pricey (£12 I believe), but I think its well worth it
    Like, I know the physiology and all the lecture content about how the nerves work in their function and repair inside out but I don't understand where they are and how they're getting about in the body eg I have no idea what all the celiac ganglion is or the brachial plexus etc Will the app help me with this? Or is there another resource?

    Thank you to yourself and everyone else for the advice; much appreciated, amigos!
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    (Original post by Butternuts96)
    Like, I know the physiology and all the lecture content about how the nerves work in their function and repair inside out but I don't understand where they are and how they're getting about in the body
    You might want to try Zygote Body (https://zygotebody.com). This used to be very good for appreciating 3d anatomy as you can search for structures (they are then highlighted) and peel back to different layers of the body - skin, muscles, nerves, bones. Unfortunately it's now been relaunched as a pay per month service (if you want access to all the features) but it's not that expensive and there is a 14 day free trial period that you could try out. It's not perfect (the coeliac ganglia isn't represented for some reason) but it will certainly show you the path of vessels, nerves, etc. Brachial plexus attached below.

    If you just want to identify key structures (and already know their name), Google images is a pretty good resource as well. You can see many different images at an instant and select the one that appeals to you most.

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