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    (Original post by dairychocolate)
    That's really not at all a big deal, especially for medicine.

    Pretty sure Cambridge also had pretty bad scores in the GMC Preparedness Poll last year, which is pretty disappointing since the main point of medical school is to prepare you to be a doctor.

    Plus, Imperial is absolutely among the global elite as far as 'prestige' is concerned.

    That said, I'd firm Cambridge in a heartbeat.
    (Original post by Student403)
    Bold is very debatable

    And personally I wouldn't care what people thought if it meant choosing the university I wanted to go to. OP has good justification in his first post.
    Fair enough. I'm just saying if he has the option to go there he may as well.
    I know too well what it's like regretting your choices. :getmecoat:
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    Remember, for medicine, always look at student satisfaction and think to yourself - 'which is the medical school i will enjoy'.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    Why not wait to see what offers you get and then make a decision? The bottom line is that you are likely to finish the course thinking your medical school is the best, whichever you choose. That said, you might as well make an informed decision and go where you think you will be happiest out of those that offer you a place.

    Potential Cambridge downsides are the heavy basic science focus (many of the tutors are scientists of various descriptions rather than medical doctors) and the extra year studying. However, many of the academics and consultants based in and around Addenbrooke's are very bright/interesting and so fun to be around.

    I wouldn't worry too much about prestige or even connections - they can be a small factor to consider (who doesn't want to impress grandma?) but I genuinely don't think they're a major consideration in terms of how your career develops. Sometimes it's easy to score the things that actually do matter for future applications (publications, prizes, being in the top decile, etc) in a "smaller pond". They certainly aren't worth sacrificing anything else for.

    One factor that I think is underrated is "where are you most likely to want to work?". Although you can apply anywhere in the country after medical school (through a process that is institution-blind), life can move on quite a long way in 5-6 years. By your final year you might have lots of friends planning to work locally, a long-term partner with their own career plans, and a supervisor looking after your career who will all be based in Cambridge/London/Cardiff. Moving away at that point might not be quite as straightforward as ticking a box on the UKFPO application form.

    Congratulations, though, and it's great to be in the position of waiting to hear whether you'll be offered anything you prefer over Cambridge!
    Thanks Yeah I've heard a lot of people end up living where they studied. Just to confirm this, does the university you studied at ever matter? Like maybe post foundation years,applying to private weekend jobs etc?
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    (Original post by just-wandering)
    Hey! Find this thread really interesting in that I'm pretty much in the exact same position as you. I have yet to receive any other offers apart from Cambridge.

    My top choice aside from Cambridge would be UCL. I think a lot of the points about going where you'd be most comfortable are important. However, I think the main factor pulling me to Cambridge would be the research focus. Yeah, you'll be a doctor either way but if you're really interested in doing a lot of research alongside clinical work it's something that Cambridge will really set you up for.

    Not 100% set on a decision yet though, will be waiting for other replies
    Found someone thinking like me aha. Which college? I didn't manage to go to the open day so my only impression is walking around on interview day. Have you seen the lecture halls and facilities? My friend's got an offer for maths there, he was telling me how it can make a huge difference where you go for that, and that it can lead to you have a much bigger salary. For medicine though there isn't such an incentive. I mean, I'm not bothered about the salary as long as it's reasonable (which it already is), but that leaves fewer things encouraging someone to go. What you said about research is definitely true, plus I think it can make it easier for you to get into a teaching position in the future.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    I think you make valid points. It's just up to you to weigh up the pros and cons, I guess.

    I think in the clinical years, there won't be much difference in workload. However, preclinical, I do think Cambridge will have a higher workload than the other places.

    Also it's worth bearing in mind that for junior doctor applications, you are scored based on how you rank within your medical school cohort. Cambridge medical students have the highest pre-entry UCAS scores, and the second highest national postgraduate exam pass rates (Oxford has better national exam pass rates), so it's likely that it's more difficult to rank highly within your cohort at Cambridge.
    Lol that sounds a little unfair, the way the scoring works. And yeah I think I just need to talk to more people who study there maybe but they're hard to find :P
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    Hello,

    Congrats on your offer!

    I'd just like to add; think about which teaching style you would prefer. Cambridge has a very traditional approach with a clinical/pre-clinical divide, but your other 3 unis have an integrated course with early patient contact, and I know Barts has a lot of PBL if that is what you would enjoy (I don't really know that much about the Medicine courses at Imperial and Cardiff).

    Don't think about prestige, in the end it is honestly about where you want to go. The whole aim is to love your course and your uni- that's at least what I'm aiming for (I've applied this year for 2016 entry!) Maybe you could chat to some people in real life/TSR who go to each of your unis, and ask them what they enjoy about their course and uni, and if they would change uni if they could.

    But remember, in the end, it's your choice.

    Good luck with everything!
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    (Original post by Halal Haribos)
    Found someone thinking like me aha. Which college? I didn't manage to go to the open day so my only impression is walking around on interview day. Have you seen the lecture halls and facilities? My friend's got an offer for maths there, he was telling me how it can make a huge difference where you go for that, and that it can lead to you have a much bigger salary. For medicine though there isn't such an incentive. I mean, I'm not bothered about the salary as long as it's reasonable (which it already is), but that leaves fewer things encouraging someone to go. What you said about research is definitely true, plus I think it can make it easier for you to get into a teaching position in the future.
    I got into Sidney Sussex, and lol same I only got to see the college during interviews. I didn't go to an open day but I did visit clare college for an event there. Even then I didn't get to see many of the facilities or lecture halls - but I did get to wander around Cambridge and the city is definitrly quite nice.

    Ive actually tried to search everywhere for where lectures for medicine happen but haven't found an answer. As far as I know, they happen outside of your college but where?

    And yeah that is true. I guess most of the motivation to go there has to come from within and the passion you have to do research and study the science in more detail than anywhere else
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    (Original post by just-wandering)
    I got into Sidney Sussex, and lol same I only got to see the college during interviews. I didn't go to an open day but I did visit clare college for an event there. Even then I didn't get to see many of the facilities or lecture halls - but I did get to wander around Cambridge and the city is definitrly quite nice.

    Ive actually tried to search everywhere for where lectures for medicine happen but haven't found an answer. As far as I know, they happen outside of your college but where?

    And yeah that is true. I guess most of the motivation to go there has to come from within and the passion you have to do research and study the science in more detail than anywhere else
    Lectures/practicals for preclinical medicine used to take place on Downing Site and New Museums Site.

    A couple of years ago, the lectures on the New Museums Site moved to the Lady Mitchell Hall on the Sidgwick Site, as the lecture theatre on the New Museums Site was being renovated.

    So it'll either be Downing Site and New Museums Site, or Downing Site and Sidgwick Site.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    Lectures/practicals for preclinical medicine used to take place on Downing Site and New Museums Site.

    A couple of years ago, the lectures on the New Museums Site moved to the Lady Mitchell Hall on the Sidgwick Site, as the lecture theatre on the New Museums Site was being renovated.

    So it'll either be Downing Site and New Museums Site, or Downing Site and Sidgwick Site.
    Thank you! So have the lecture halls at New Museum Site been renovated already, or is this still going on
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    (Original post by just-wandering)
    Thank you! So have the lecture halls at New Museum Site been renovated already, or is this still going on
    No idea, I'm afraid! Downing Site is still used in any case.

    There will probably be publicly viewable timetables on the faculty of biology website. If you Google search for "MVST IA timetables". Should give you the locations etc there too.

    Edit: forgot to say, lots of 2nd year lectures are at the Chemistry Lecture Theatre.
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    (Original post by 7me7)
    ,

    Good luck with everything!
    Thanks
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    (Original post by just-wandering)
    I got into Sidney Sussex, and lol same I only got to see the college during interviews. I didn't go to an open day but I did visit clare college for an event there. Even then I didn't get to see many of the facilities or lecture halls - but I did get to wander around Cambridge and the city is definitrly quite nice.

    Ive actually tried to search everywhere for where lectures for medicine happen but haven't found an answer. As far as I know, they happen outside of your college but where?

    And yeah that is true. I guess most of the motivation to go there has to come from within and the passion you have to do research and study the science in more detail than anywhere else
    I think I might go back for a day to chat with some students and look around more. And I've heard the same as what Chief Wiggum has said about the lecture halls.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    No idea, I'm afraid! Downing Site is still used in any case.

    There will probably be publicly viewable timetables on the faculty of biology website. If you Google search for "MVST IA timetables". Should give you the locations etc there too.

    Edit: forgot to say, lots of 2nd year lectures are at the Chemistry Lecture Theatre.
    Oh okay. Thanks for that, actually quite useful to get a feel of the average week of a med student.
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    (Original post by Halal Haribos)
    Hey guys.

    So basically I managed to get an offer from Robinson College at Cambridge which I was pretty gassed with at first. But, I honestly don't know whether to choose Cambridge. I haven't got any other offers yet but if I did, I'm not sure which I'd pick. I know to some people it might sound stupid not to, but hear me out. Cambridge has its perks; the supervisions, the facilities, the wide range of 3rd year research project choices etc but quite simply it's a ton of work from what I've heard. If I was lucky enough to get an Imperial, Cardiff or Queen Mary offer, it would also be hard work but less so and it also (I think) more fun as they're in London/big city; I us think they'd be more fun. And as everyone ends up being a doctor it makes no difference to your job prospects, speciality, salary etc etc. So, work extremely hard and be a doctor or work less hard and be a doctor?

    So basically, just in case I'm missing any points here, what are your thoughts? Any points I'm missing?
    Sorry if I sound like nob for presenting what some of my friends think isn't a problem, I don't mean to sound ungrateful.

    Cheers
    My perceptions are based on Oxford but Cambridge is pretty similar.

    The pre-clinical probably is harder work, though I suspect that most people over-estimate the difference. There's more basic science focus, more labs.

    The clinical is likely quite similar, though in my experience Oxbridge treat their students more like adults, trusting them to guide their own learning more than some logbook-obsessed other places (some even make their students sign into lectures). If its like Oxford, there will be more of a focus on hospital medicine and less focus on GP than other schools.

    Cambridge will be significantly cheaper. Cambridge is an expensive place but the university will heavily subsidise your living.

    Cambridge will put a lot more money into your education and surroundings in general. That's not to be scoffed at.

    (Original post by Halal Haribos)
    . Just to confirm this, does the university you studied at ever matter?
    So, there are statistically significant differences in foundation application scores, and postgrad exam results. The proposed national finals exam will likely further exaggerate these differences. This might be due to different entry standards or differing teaching standards, or both. There are differences with the proportion of each speciality each uni produces. Hypothetically, uni choice may make a difference when applying abroad, or when applying for private practice, though not in and quantifiable way I know of. It might make a difference if you left medicine.
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    (Original post by Halal Haribos)
    Thanks Yeah I've heard a lot of people end up living where they studied. Just to confirm this, does the university you studied at ever matter? Like maybe post foundation years,applying to private weekend jobs etc?
    It certainly doesn't matter very much, if ever. I don't think anyone at work has asked where I went to medical school (even in conversation !!) in five years since qualifying. Don't worry about the way foundation programme applications are scored either. Your decile rank only makes up a tiny proportion of the application score and they'll almost certainly have thought up some equally ridiculous (but different) way to rank you all in 5-6 years time. These are all very minor considerations.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    It certainly doesn't matter very much, if ever. I don't think anyone at work has asked where I went to medical school (even in conversation !!) in five years since qualifying. Don't worry about the way foundation programme applications are scored either. Your decile rank only makes up a tiny proportion of the application score and they'll almost certainly have thought up some equally ridiculous (but different) way to rank you all in 5-6 years time. These are all very minor considerations.
    While 10 points out of 100 sounds tiny, everyone starts with 34 though, and the distribution of the SJT scores is weighted such that it contributes equally to decile scoring. So I'd say that in practice, decile scores makes up a pretty big component (in theory deciles and SJT contribute equally).

    Your point about the system possibly changing is valid though.
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    IMO...
    Reasons for putting Cambridge: Teaching methods (as you've said), notoriety would enable you to go to other places nationally and internationally in a stronger position, beautiful place, Addenbrookes Hospital is world-renowned and prices at Cambridge are far cheaper compared to London prices particularly for accommodation. Also, I know someone who was pooled to Robinson College for Medicine and she had a really great time and wants to do medical research now back at Cambridge, so she had an enjoyable time as well as having really great career prospects.

    However...
    As you rightly pointed out it would be hard work, but then and again Medicine is a hard course regardless of where you go! At Cambridge you'd just be fitting all the same/similar content into fewer weeks per term which could cause lots of extra stress. At London Unis, you would have greater access to all of the amazing facilities and a greater number of hospitals than at Cambridge.
    However, if University life is a big factor, also consider the fact that at London you not only have the more expensive prices but also you do not have the nice feel of being in an exclusive University town (you should probably ask some current students though for their opinions because it may not be as bad as I am making it out to be).

    Ultimately it is your choice and particularly for a course like Medicine, it does not matter where you go because the end qualification is going to be the same! London Unis are amazing and very well ranked internationally too - no one should force you into accepting Cambridge just because it is 'the best uni in the world' (which it isn't). You need to go with where you are most drawn to because the more you enjoy being at that place, the more you'll get out of the course and the people teaching you. Lots of people turn down Cambridge because they simply realise it is not for them, and in a lot of cases it really isn't the right place for them because it's such a different level of rigour. The problem with TSR is that you feel like if you don't go to Oxbridge you will have basically failed at life which is 100% not true!
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    I don't think anyone at work has asked where I went to medical school (even in conversation !!) in five years since qualifying.
    Really? I get asked all the time, mostly by consultants (but in a friendly, conversation-starting way).
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    Really? I get asked all the time, mostly by consultants (but in a friendly, conversation-starting way).
    Me too. Awks moment when I discovered one of the consultants I regularly work with went to the same college as me, but didn't get invited to the special medics' alumni dinner they recently held...
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    Hmm... I can't explain that discrepancy !!
 
 
 
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