What is the name/law for rewriting a log into exponential form?

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GarlicBread01
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Hi I was wondering what is the name/law given to the process of rewriting a logarithm into a exponential form? Some of the people in my class said its called the 'inverse log', others said its the 'anti log' and others called it the 'Rewrite as a power law' lol. Since our teacher hasnt been in for time I was just wondering if there is an actual name for this

e.g log2(8) = 3 rewritten to give 2^3 = 8

Thanks
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TeeEm
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(Original post by GarlicBread01)
Hi I was wondering what is the name/law given to the process of rewriting a logarithm into a exponential form? Some of the people in my class said its called the 'inverse log', others said its the 'anti log' and others called it the 'Rewrite as a power law' lol. Since our teacher hasnt been in for time I was just wondering if there is an actual name for this

e.g log2(8) = 3 rewritten to give 2^3 = 8

Thanks
there is no name as far as I know.
this is the definition of a logarithm
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1420787
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I'd just say "writing it in exponent form" or perhaps "exponential form".

Using words like inverse log and anti-log are surely only used to remind students of the relationship between them. I'd never actually call it either if those things.
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Flame Alchemist
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Google does throw up correct results for both 'anti-log' and 'inverse log', actually, but mainly with regard to just doing that stuff on a calculator. People might get what you mean, but certainly not necessarily straight away.
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GarlicBread01
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So if I had a question where

log_3 (\frac{y^2}{y+4}) = 2

and then I had to do this to solve it

\frac{y^2}{y+4} = 3^2

\frac{y^2}{y+4} = 9

y^2= 9(y+4)

etc..

I would say "I rewrote the equation in exponent form to get rid of the log function to be able to solve it"

None of that anti/inverse log silly business?
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1420787
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(Original post by GarlicBread01)
So if I had a question where

log_3 (\frac{y^2}{y+4}) = 2

and then I had to do this to solve it

\frac{y^2}{y+4} = 3^2

\frac{y^2}{y+4} = 9

y^2= 9(y+4)

etc..

I would say "I rewrote the equation in exponent form to get rid of the log function to be able to solve it"

None of that anti/inverse log silly business?
Precisely, as far as I'm concerned anyway.

Reminding people that something is the inverse of something else can be useful. But I'd never say "anti-" anything in maths. I'm not American
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