How much chemistry is involved in this degree?

Watch
Ethereal21foreva
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Is it the same with A level Chemistry?
0
reply
thegodofgod
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
(Original post by 06sulraj)
Is it the same with A level Chemistry?
Yup, the chemistry won't be any more difficult than A level Chemistry, but it will be all be applied to drugs - you'll be learning a lot about functional groups, especially ionisable functional groups, a bit about stereochemistry and its importance in drug-target interactions, pharmacophores, factors that affect a drug's pharmacokinetics, e.g. absorption across a membrane (Lipinski's rule of 5), distribution (more lipophilic and acidic drugs will be bound to plasma albumin more extensively, which could lead to pharmacokinetic interactions with highly protein-bound drugs, e.g. warfarin), metabolism, e.g. the ethinyl group on ethinyloestradiol resists oxidation by CYP450 enzymes, so it is clinically used at much lower doses than oestradiol (20-30 mcg/day vs 2 mg/day), and excretion, e.g. aspirin toxicity can be treated with forced alkaline diuresis as it is an acidic drug.

So essentially, you'll be applying your knowledge of chemistry to drugs, but the level of chemistry will not be any more difficult than A level Chemistry.
2
reply
Ethereal21foreva
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#3
(Original post by thegodofgod)
Yup, the chemistry won't be any more difficult than A level Chemistry, but it will be all be applied to drugs - you'll be learning a lot about functional groups, especially ionisable functional groups, a bit about stereochemistry and its importance in drug-target interactions, pharmacophores, factors that affect a drug's pharmacokinetics, e.g. absorption across a membrane (Lipinski's rule of 5), distribution (more lipophilic and acidic drugs will be bound to plasma albumin more extensively, which could lead to pharmacokinetic interactions with highly protein-bound drugs, e.g. warfarin), metabolism, e.g. the ethinyl group on ethinyloestradiol resists oxidation by CYP450 enzymes, so it is clinically used at much lower doses than oestradiol (20-30 mcg/day vs 2 mg/day), and excretion, e.g. aspirin toxicity can be treated with forced alkaline diuresis as it is an acidic drug.

So essentially, you'll be applying your knowledge of chemistry to drugs, but the level of chemistry will not be any more difficult than A level Chemistry.
Thanks! Is drugs all that you learn? What about the body systems?
0
reply
thegodofgod
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
(Original post by 06sulraj)
Thanks! Is drugs all that you learn? What about the body systems?
Yup, of course we do cover anatomy (not much at all to be honest), physiology, pathophysiology, etc., but obviously not as much as medics would. I think the focus of pharmacy is more on pharmacology, drug delivery and formulation.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you tempted to change your firm university choice on A-level results day?

Yes, I'll try and go to a uni higher up the league tables (26)
27.96%
Yes, there is a uni that I prefer and I'll fit in better (9)
9.68%
No I am happy with my choice (52)
55.91%
I'm using Clearing when I have my exam results (6)
6.45%

Watched Threads

View All