How do you learn new vocabulairy when learning a language? Watch

ihatePE
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English is my second language but since i live in an english speaking country, the words just force itself into my brain and stay there, but since i'm learning french in school and will be doing the exam in may this year, i really need to get more vocabs. So how do you do it?
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Anna Schoon
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(Original post by ihatePE)
English is my second language but since i live in an english speaking country, the words just force itself into my brain and stay there, but since i'm learning french in school and will be doing the exam in may this year, i really need to get more vocabs. So how do you do it?
For learning vocab, there are various strategies:

- topic-based: make lists of vocab according to their specificity; group vocab together is smaller related groups. For example, if you're studying the topic of health, you can make various sub-groups: healthy food; unhealthy food; exercise; science (eg nutrition) etc. Just organising the vocab helps you learn it! Then you can try using words from each group in sentences.

- families: when you learn a word, learn other derived words. For example, if you take the word "conduire", go to a dictionary and get the other words that relate to it: le conducteur/la conductrice; la conduite. Again, just doing that basic research will help fix the vocab in your mind but you will also find that your range of vocab suddenly expands massively with very little effort.

- then there's the classic "Write, Look, Cover, Repeat" method. The physical act of writing down words helps you memorise them. Take a piece of paper, draw a vertical line down the middle and write the English word on the left and the French equivalent on the right. Memorise the list, then cover the French side and tick off all the ones you remember. Then repeat until you know them all. It is important to do this several times with each list so that the vocab goes into your long-term memory.
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ihatePE
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(Original post by Anna Schoon)
For learning vocab, there are various strategies:

- topic-based: make lists of vocab according to their specificity; group vocab together is smaller related groups. For example, if you're studying the topic of health, you can make various sub-groups: healthy food; unhealthy food; exercise; science (eg nutrition) etc. Just organising the vocab helps you learn it! Then you can try using words from each group in sentences.

- families: when you learn a word, learn other derived words. For example, if you take the word "conduire", go to a dictionary and get the other words that relate to it: le conducteur/la conductrice; la conduite. Again, just doing that basic research will help fix the vocab in your mind but you will also find that your range of vocab suddenly expands massively with very little effort.

- then there's the classic "Write, Look, Cover, Repeat" method. The physical act of writing down words helps you memorise them. Take a piece of paper, draw a vertical line down the middle and write the English word on the left and the French equivalent on the right. Memorise the list, then cover the French side and tick off all the ones you remember. Then repeat until you know them all. It is important to do this several times with each list so that the vocab goes into your long-term memory.
thanks! I've decided to do the write look cover repeat thing before i posted this, glad that it's a recognised method
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DedicatedWizard
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Use Duolingo! I find it incredibly useful, or use a flash card app like Brainscape or Quizlet.
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rileystringer1
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(Original post by ihatePE)
thanks! I've decided to do the write look cover repeat thing before i posted this, glad that it's a recognised method
Aren't you doing French at GCSE? When I did it 2 years ago with AQA, we got a booklet with all of the vocab that could come up in the exams, I think it was on the AQA site but our teacher gave it us anyway, if you can get one of those then do, download Quizlet to test yourself on any vocab lists that you manage to find

For GCSE I didn't learn any vocab myself, I just worked with what I recognised because it wasn't that difficult, but to an AS student I'd recommend reading French news articles and downloading 'ReadLang' to translate any words that you don't understand that are vital to the text, and learn them.. at GCSE that would be very extensive but if you want to do it then feel free

edit: printing news articles or even texts from past papers and writing in words that are new to you is a good way to learn vocab, because you see words in action so you get an idea of how they're actually used (by reading them in context)
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barnetlad
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The best way to learn new words in a language is being there, I find. Hope you get the opportunity.
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MezzaTheMez
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Our teacher set this computer thing called task magic for us with all the possible vocab in it so I played that for an hour or so every day until it had sunk in and I got A* at GCSE. The other class used something else like a website but I can't remember right now sorry, but I don't really think it matters if you use a fancy computer thing or not because they're all just variations of cover write check stuff anyway so that's probably the best method. Also maybe try watching films with the subtitles instead of dub? Apparently that helps.
Good luck on your exams!


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Yasmin-9970
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watch french youtubers
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(Original post by Anna Schoon)
For learning vocab, there are various strategies:

- topic-based: make lists of vocab according to their specificity; group vocab together is smaller related groups. For example, if you're studying the topic of health, you can make various sub-groups: healthy food; unhealthy food; exercise; science (eg nutrition) etc. Just organising the vocab helps you learn it! Then you can try using words from each group in sentences.

- families: when you learn a word, learn other derived words. For example, if you take the word "conduire", go to a dictionary and get the other words that relate to it: le conducteur/la conductrice; la conduite. Again, just doing that basic research will help fix the vocab in your mind but you will also find that your range of vocab suddenly expands massively with very little effort.

- then there's the classic "Write, Look, Cover, Repeat" method. The physical act of writing down words helps you memorise them. Take a piece of paper, draw a vertical line down the middle and write the English word on the left and the French equivalent on the right. Memorise the list, then cover the French side and tick off all the ones you remember. Then repeat until you know them all. It is important to do this several times with each list so that the vocab goes into your long-term memory.
Excellent advice! I think the first two methods are especially effective in learning vocabulary, and whilst the classic method can work, I find it tedious. :bigsmile:
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JuliusDS92
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(Original post by ihatePE)
English is my second language but since i live in an english speaking country, the words just force itself into my brain and stay there, but since i'm learning french in school and will be doing the exam in may this year, i really need to get more vocabs. So how do you do it?
I use memrise.com - definitely worth checking out.
What's your first language?
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ihatePE
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(Original post by Yasmin-9970)
watch french youtubers
Yeah im subscribed to some and from time to time would watch to pick out words i know xD


(Original post by rileystringer1)
Aren't you doing French at GCSE? When I did it 2 years ago with AQA, we got a booklet with all of the vocab that could come up in the exams, I think it was on the AQA site but our teacher gave it us anyway, if you can get one of those then do, download Quizlet to test yourself on any vocab lists that you manage to find

For GCSE I didn't learn any vocab myself, I just worked with what I recognised because it wasn't that difficult, but to an AS student I'd recommend reading French news articles and downloading 'ReadLang' to translate any words that you don't understand that are vital to the text, and learn them.. at GCSE that would be very extensive but if you want to do it then feel free

edit: printing news articles or even texts from past papers and writing in words that are new to you is a good way to learn vocab, because you see words in action so you get an idea of how they're actually used (by reading them in context)
I really want to become somewhat fluent in french, im not just doing it for gcse My teacher gave me a blue book which is the exam board dictionary, i think thats what you mean right?


(Original post by JuliusDS92)
I use memrise.com - definitely worth checking out.
What's your first language?
thanks for the website my first language is vietnamese
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rileystringer1
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(Original post by ihatePE)
I really want to become somewhat fluent in french, im not just doing it for gcse My teacher gave me a blue book which is the exam board dictionary, i think thats what you mean right?
Ah d'accord. D'après moi, la façon la plus facile et efficace de s'améliorer en français et de faire moins de fautes, ça doit être pratiquer avec des français. Il y a une société française ici sur TSR alors tu pourrais en profiter en le revivant parce que le fil est mort C'était très vivant quand j'utilisais et je dirais qu'en pratiquant là avec des français et des gens qui apprennent la langue comme moi, j'ai fait pas mal de progrès. En parlent aux français, tu commenceras à parler/écrire plus naturellement et tu apprendras des expressions françaises qui donnent l'air d'un vrai français

De plus, en ce qui concerne la compréhension orale, il convient de s'immerser dans la langue autant que possible. Par exemple en regardant des émissions françaises ou des films, ou même les nouvelles en français, comme ça tu apprendras facilement et rapidement de nouveau vocabulaire mais aussi des expressions etc.

For GCSE, focus on doing lots of practice papers and if you don't get the grade you want, see why, look at where you made mistakes and think how they could be put right, ask your teacher if you are struggling with anything.

As suggested above it's good to learn vocabulary by topic, because I remember the questions at GCSE were sorted into topics, so if you have lots of topic-specific vocabulary in your long-term memory then you can apply it all to the topics that come up and it will all be sorted compartment-ally

If you don't have a vocab booklet divided into sections then google i.e. "AQA GCSE French vocabulary", print it and learn it in chunks
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IrrationalRoot
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You could start by spelling 'vocabulary' right.
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