Why are strange particles always created in pairs?

Watch
GarlicBread01
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
So the AQA A-level physics spec says
"Understand why strange particles are created in pairs"

But my book doesnt really do a good job explaining this and all I could find was
"The conservation of strangeness means that strange particles can only be created in pairs"

Could anyone help understand why exactly this means that they can only be created in pairs? And what 'created in pairs' actually means?

Thanks
0
reply
Gregorius
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
(Original post by GarlicBread01)
So the AQA A-level physics spec says
"Understand why strange particles are created in pairs"

But my book doesnt really do a good job explaining this and all I could find was
"The conservation of strangeness means that strange particles can only be created in pairs"

Could anyone help understand why exactly this means that they can only be created in pairs? And what 'created in pairs' actually means?

Thanks
Does this article help?
0
reply
uberteknik
  • Study Helper
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by GarlicBread01)
So the AQA A-level physics spec says
"Understand why strange particles are created in pairs"

But my book doesnt really do a good job explaining this and all I could find was
"The conservation of strangeness means that strange particles can only be created in pairs"

Could anyone help understand why exactly this means that they can only be created in pairs? And what 'created in pairs' actually means?

Thanks
Find the answer and a Nobel Prize awaits you.

It's rather like asking why does the universe exist or why do atoms exist?

All we know is that it's a consequence of our observed universe which requires laws of conservation and symmetry to maintain the status quo. That includes equal and opposite particles.

Without symmetry the laws of physics as we know them and hence the the universe in which we live cannot hold true.

Text books fudge this issue because it's the only answer (however unsatisfactory) we have.
0
reply
Flame Alchemist
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
It's not just specifically strange particles which are created in pairs, but rather the genesis of an elementary particle is accompanied by its correspondent antiparticle in order that all quantum numbers are conserved (i.e. energy and momentum is conserved, and also the charge, lepton number, strangeness etc. sum to zero).

Is this question part of a question discussing strange particles in particular? I'm not sure why it would bother specifying otherwise...
0
reply
GarlicBread01
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#5
(Original post by Gregorius)
Does this article help?
Okay, I'm not sure if everything is required knowledge for my exams, but from what I understood is that in reactions, S=0 on side so the other must also add up to 0. But the only way to do that is to have 'pairs' of strange particles of the other i.e one that has S=+1 and another S=-1. You cannot produce only 1 strange particle or 3 strange particles as that combination wouldn't add up to 0?

Thanks for the help!
0
reply
Kyx
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
(Original post by GarlicBread01)
So the AQA A-level physics spec says
"Understand why strange particles are created in pairs"

But my book doesnt really do a good job explaining this and all I could find was
"The conservation of strangeness means that strange particles can only be created in pairs"

Could anyone help understand why exactly this means that they can only be created in pairs? And what 'created in pairs' actually means?

Thanks
Strangeness before must be equal to strangeness after. So, if a particle of strangeness +1 appeared out of nowhere, a particle of strangeness -1 must appear as well, to make the strangeness before equal to the strangeness after: Before = 0, after = +1 + (-1) = 0
0
reply
Joinedup
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 years ago
#7
IMO you're required to *Know that* strange particles are created in pairs, not *Understand why*
0
reply
Kyx
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 years ago
#8
(Original post by Joinedup)
IMO you're required to *Know that* strange particles are created in pairs, not *Understand why*
(Original post by GarlicBread01)
So the AQA A-level physics spec says
"Understand why strange particles are created in pairs"

But my book doesnt really do a good job explaining this and all I could find was
"The conservation of strangeness means that strange particles can only be created in pairs"

Could anyone help understand why exactly this means that they can only be created in pairs? And what 'created in pairs' actually means?

Thanks
Big, red and bold
0
reply
Joinedup
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 years ago
#9
(Original post by Kyx)
Big, red and bold
Where, prey tell, in the actual AQA spec does it say
"Understand why strange particles are created in pairs"

thanks.
0
reply
Kyx
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 years ago
#10
(Original post by Joinedup)
Where, prey tell, in the actual AQA spec does it say
"Understand why strange particles are created in pairs"

thanks.
It doesn't, I was quoting the OP.
0
reply
Joinedup
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 4 years ago
#11
(Original post by Kyx)
It doesn't, I was quoting the OP.
So actually he's required to *know that* strange particles are created in pairs then rather than *understand why* then?
0
reply
Kyx
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 years ago
#12
(Original post by Joinedup)
So actually he's required to *know that* strange particles are created in pairs then rather than *understand why* then?
Yes. I read the spec.

It says that you should be able to use 'conservation of strangeness'. If you know that, that's all you need.
0
reply
GarlicBread01
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#13
(Original post by Kyx)
Strangeness before must be equal to strangeness after. So, if a particle of strangeness +1 appeared out of nowhere, a particle of strangeness -1 must appear as well, to make the strangeness before equal to the strangeness after: Before = 0, after = +1 + (-1) = 0
Yep, that makes sense now. Thanks!
0
reply
Kyx
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#14
Report 4 years ago
#14
(Original post by GarlicBread01)
Yep, that makes sense now. Thanks!
YW
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (99)
13.52%
I'm not sure (32)
4.37%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (230)
31.42%
I have already dropped out (17)
2.32%
I'm not a current university student (354)
48.36%

Watched Threads

View All