Where did all the jobs for chemical engineers go? Watch

Tom3211
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Hi everybody, I'm soon to be graduating from my MEng chemical engineering degree and so far this year have really struggled to find any employment for next year, both in terms of getting rejections left, right & centre, as well as there simply being a shortage of jobs to apply for. This seems to be the consensus amongst a lot of people on my course, so my question is: what areas are best to look for graduate level work right now suitable for chemical engineers?
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Smack
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(Original post by Tom3211)
Hi everybody, I'm soon to be graduating from my MEng chemical engineering degree and so far this year have really struggled to find any employment for next year, both in terms of getting rejections left, right & centre, as well as there simply being a shortage of jobs to apply for. This seems to be the consensus amongst a lot of people among my course, so my question is: what areas are best to looks for graduate level work right now suitable for chemical engineers?
Hi Tom, sorry about your situation. I think that the current issues facing the oil & gas industry could be having an effect on chemical engineering employment, as is the fact that chemical engineering as a degree has rapidly increased in popularity over the last half decade, meaning that there is increased competition for available positions.

I would look into the water, food & drink, materials, and maybe some others too. I'm hearing biochemical/biomedical could be a big thing in the future, too, but can't verify that. Are you using Gradcracker?
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poohat
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Have you checked oil prices lately?

Its a massacre, people are being laid off right- left and centre, recruitment is down, and salaries are plumetting
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Nathanielle
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Depending on your degree, you could also qualify for other engineering disciplines, so maybe look in that direction. General Engineers or Mechanical Engineers are often not specifically qualified for certain jobs, either. Skills as e.g. using Matlab or planning experiments can be used in a lot of engineering jobs.
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Tom3211
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Thanks for the advice. Yeah, oil & gas, as well as commodities and various other goings on seems to be really taking its toll. I've been using Gradcracker, but given there's going to be well over 3000 graduating chemical engineers this year and of the order of 10s of advertised positions specific to chemical engineers I don't plan on relying on it helping me get a job!
It's interesting to hear about applying for general engineering positions, I've noticed many advertised positions rarely list chemeng as one of their considered disciplines, despite them all having similar skills sets, do you think it's still worth going for these positions?
It's going to be an interesting year to see if IChemE has been maybe overpromoting the demand for engineers. Regarding looking into other industries outside engineering, obviously I'm willing and want to keep on developing but after slaving to get a 1st class engineering degree from a decent uni, it feels a bit like getting a pilot's licence and being told there are no planes to fly anymore.
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Smack
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(Original post by Tom3211)
It's interesting to hear about applying for general engineering positions, I've noticed many advertised positions rarely list chemeng as one of their considered disciplines, despite them all having similar skills sets, do you think it's still worth going for these positions?
Yes.

From what I understand, fluid mechanics, heat transfer and thermodynamics makes up a significant portion of a chemical engineering degree. Ergo, I would look into positions utilising these skills. Be prepared to sell yourself, too, as some recruiters may not be used to dealing with chemical engineering graduates and hence may not be fully aware of what the degree entails.

And there are also the less specifically technical engineering positions, too, like project engineers, operations engineers, quality engineers and the like. My first role outside of university was in QA/process improvement and my boss was actually a chemical engineering graduate in a similar situation to you: he graduated sometime in the 90s when employment prospects for chemical engineers similar to now I think, and ended up going into quality, working in the automotive and aerospace sectors, and eventually oil & gas.

With a strong degree in chemical engineering, you're certainly not ****ed when it comes to employment, even if chemical engineering specific recruitment is challenging at the moment. There is finance, IT, teaching, pretty much all the jobs that don't require a specific degree discipline.

You can use LinkedIn to see what previous chemical engineering graduate have gone into, and for ideas of what you can go into as well.
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Nathanielle
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(Original post by Tom3211)
It's interesting to hear about applying for general engineering positions, I've noticed many advertised positions rarely list chemeng as one of their considered disciplines, despite them all having similar skills sets, do you think it's still worth going for these positions?
A lot of engineers were not specifically trained in their studies to do a certain role. General Engineering and Mechanical Engineering are often very broad degrees and a part from the broader skillset, the overlap between position and courses may only be tiny. So go for it, as long as you think you have the skills to do the job.
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ImNervous
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(Original post by Tom3211)
Hi everybody, I'm soon to be graduating from my MEng chemical engineering degree and so far this year have really struggled to find any employment for next year, both in terms of getting rejections left, right & centre, as well as there simply being a shortage of jobs to apply for. This seems to be the consensus amongst a lot of people among my course, so my question is: what areas are best to looks for graduate level work right now suitable for chemical engineers?
Hi. Really sorry to hear about your situation. Especially since I will be starting a chemical engineering course this year.
If you don't mind me asking, what uni will be graduating from?

Posted from TSR Mobile
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elkurdy
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brother a little advice, I know everyone has a different way in sorting things but you might want to think about looking into going abroad as chemical engineers in particular are widely emplyable
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spike_spiegel
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could you expand on that
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sucoutuuglyqank
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Any update on this?
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Student-95
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(Original post by sucoutuuglyqank)
Any update on this?
The grad to jobs ratio has continued to worsen.
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sucoutuuglyqank
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Source?
(Original post by Student-95)
The grad to jobs ratio has continued to worsen.
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Student-95
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(Original post by sucoutuuglyqank)
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Engineering UK puts out a report every year called 'The state of engineering'
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