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Replication of DNA help👀😿? Watch

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    Hey there, lovely souls💕!

    So I've been going throughout my Biology Past-Paper's questions lately, and I've noticed that I don't quite get this question " Describe the replication of DNA"

    It's worth (5) Marks and it seems to be asked over and over again throughout the years 📅 😏!

    So I'd love to get a some kind of a module answer there that can make me ace the (5)Marks stated🎉

    Thank you all💕much love!
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    (Original post by Redsauce)
    Hey there, lovely souls💕!

    So I've been going throughout my Biology Past-Paper's questions lately, and I've noticed that I don't quite get this question " Describe the replication of DNA"

    It's worth (5) Marks and it seems to be asked over and over again throughout the years 📅 😏!

    So I'd love to get a some kind of a module answer there that can make me ace the (5)Marks stated🎉

    Thank you all💕much love!
    A level or GCSE?
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    (Original post by Redsauce)
    Hey there, lovely souls💕!

    So I've been going throughout my Biology Past-Paper's questions lately, and I've noticed that I don't quite get this question " Describe the replication of DNA"

    It's worth (5) Marks and it seems to be asked over and over again throughout the years 📅 😏!

    So I'd love to get a some kind of a module answer there that can make me ace the (5)Marks stated🎉

    Thank you all💕much love!
    model
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    (Original post by sw651)
    A level or GCSE?

    Hey sw651
    Have you checked out World Conquest 2: Reborn?

    (I think it's A-level)
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    (Original post by Redsauce)
    Hey there, lovely souls💕!

    So I've been going throughout my Biology Past-Paper's questions lately, and I've noticed that I don't quite get this question " Describe the replication of DNA"

    It's worth (5) Marks and it seems to be asked over and over again throughout the years 📅 😏!

    So I'd love to get a some kind of a module answer there that can make me ace the (5)Marks stated🎉

    Thank you all💕much love!
    The DNA is unwound and unzipped. The helix structure is unwound. Special molecules break the weak hydrogen bonds between bases, which are holding the two strands together. This process occurs at several locations on a DNA molecule. DNA polymerase adds DNA nucleotides in a 5’ to 3’ direction. Complementary DNA nucleotides are added to the now exposed bases on both strands. Adenine pairs with thymine, thymine with adenine, cytosine with guanine and guanine with cytosine. A primer is needed to start replication.
    1. Leading strand is synthesised continuously. DNA polymerase adds nucleotides to the deoxyribose (3’) ended strand in a 5’ to 3’ direction.
    2. Lagging strand is synthesised in fragments. Nucleotides cannot be added to the phosphate (5’) end because DNA polymerase can only add DNA nucleotides in a 5’ to 3’ direction. The lagging strand is therefore synthesised in fragments. The fragments are then sealed together by an enzyme called ligase. Stage three
    The two new strands twist to form a double helix. Each is identical to the original strand.
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    (Original post by Kyx)
    model
    Blame it on my auto-corrector 😅x
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    (Original post by Redsauce)
    Blame it on my auto-corrector 😅x
    'auto-correct'
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    (Original post by sw651)
    The DNA is unwound and unzipped. The helix structure is unwound. Special molecules break the weak hydrogen bonds between bases, which are holding the two strands together. This process occurs at several locations on a DNA molecule. DNA polymerase adds DNA nucleotides in a 5’ to 3’ direction. Complementary DNA nucleotides are added to the now exposed bases on both strands. Adenine pairs with thymine, thymine with adenine, cytosine with guanine and guanine with cytosine. A primer is needed to start replication.
    1. Leading strand is synthesised continuously. DNA polymerase adds nucleotides to the deoxyribose (3’) ended strand in a 5’ to 3’ direction.
    2. Lagging strand is synthesised in fragments. Nucleotides cannot be added to the phosphate (5’) end because DNA polymerase can only add DNA nucleotides in a 5’ to 3’ direction. The lagging strand is therefore synthesised in fragments. The fragments are then sealed together by an enzyme called ligase. Stage three
    The two new strands twist to form a double helix. Each is identical to the original strand.

    Thank you loads🙏💕!! This really helped xo
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    (Original post by Redsauce)
    Thank you loads🙏💕!! This really helped xo
    You're welcome! If you want I can give you the short answer too which will easily get you the five marks with no effort?
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    (Original post by sw651)
    You're welcome! If you want I can give you the short answer too which will easily get you the five marks with no effort?
    Sure💕! x
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    (Original post by Redsauce)
    Sure💕! x
    So the double helix structure will unwind and unzip using DNA helicase. Free nucleotides then bind to the base pairing rule, A-T And G-C with the parent strand acting as a template. This new strand is elongated by DNA polymerase where the sugar phosphate backbone is formed. This process is known as semi conservative replication because one old strand is kept and one new strand is formed.


    All the bold parts are marking points. There are 8
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    (Original post by sw651)
    So the double helix structure will unwind and unzip using DNA helicase. Free nucleotides then bind to the base pairing rule, A-T And G-C with the parent strand acting as a template. This new strand is elongated by DNA polymerase where the sugar phosphate backbone is formed. This process is known as semi conservative replication because one old strand is kept and one new strand is formed.


    All the bold parts are marking points. There are 8
    Thankyou so much buddy x !
    I highly appreciate your help✊✨
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    (Original post by Redsauce)
    Hey there, lovely souls💕!

    So I've been going throughout my Biology Past-Paper's questions lately, and I've noticed that I don't quite get this question " Describe the replication of DNA"

    It's worth (5) Marks and it seems to be asked over and over again throughout the years 📅 😏!

    So I'd love to get a some kind of a module answer there that can make me ace the (5)Marks stated🎉

    Thank you all💕much love!
    1.) DNA Helicase (enzyme) breaks the hydrogen bonds between the complementary base pairs. It breaks 2 hydrogen bonds between A-T and 3 between C-G.
    2.) The breaking of the hydrogen bonds unzips/exposes the two polynucleotide strands.
    3.) Free flowing nucleotides (which each have a nitrogenous base) will base pair with complementary bases on the existing polynucleotide strands.
    4.) Enzyme DNA polymerase will form phosphodiester bonds between the phosphate group of one nucleotide and the pentose sugar (Deoxyribose) of another nucleotide, in order to form the polynucleotide strands.
    5.) The hydrogen bonds will reform between complementary bases.

    Also, note that this is known as semi-conservative replication because both newly formed DNA molecules consist of half of the parent DNA molecule i.e. each new DNA molecule has one strand which originally made up the parent DNA molecule.

    If you have any other questions, don't hesitate to ask!
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    (Original post by SANTR)
    1.) DNA Helicase (enzyme) breaks the hydrogen bonds between the complementary base pairs. It breaks 3 hydrogen bonds between A-T and 2 between C-G.
    2.) The breaking of the hydrogen bonds unzips/exposes the two polynucleotide strands.
    3.) Free flowing nucleotides (which each have a nitrogenous base) will base pair with complementary bases on the existing polynucleotide strands.
    4.) Enzyme DNA polymerase will form phosphodiester bonds between the phosphate group of one nucleotide and the pentose sugar (Deoxyribose) of another nucleotide, in order to form the polynucleotide strands.
    5.) The hydrogen bonds will reform between complementary bases.

    Also, note that this is known as semi-conservative replication because both newly formed DNA molecules consist of half of the parent DNA molecule i.e. each new DNA molecule has one strand which originally made up the parent DNA molecule.

    If you have any other questions, don't hesitate to ask!
    Thank you so much!
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    (Original post by SANTR)
    It breaks 3 hydrogen bonds between A-T and 2 between C-G.
    It's the other way round; there are 2 between A - T and 3 between C - G.
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    (Original post by usycool1)
    It's the other way round; there are 2 between A - T and 3 between C - G.
    Apologies for the mistake.
    Yes I believe you're correct.
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    Don't forget Topoisomerase ahead of the replication fork to help with that supercoiling problem. Hahaha, no seriously, the above answers are fine. You say what these guys said it would be full 5 marks.
 
 
 
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