glowanti
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I'm currently in Year 11 and I've put French as one of my options, I'm an A* student in French and I absolutely love it but I've heard people say it's close to impossible if your family isn't native French (and I'm the only one in my family who speaks any remote French)

Will I instantly get a U or ?? how hard is it ?
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cherrycola98
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I am in Year 13 and I absolutely love French and have done all the way through school. I was also an A* student in Year 11, and I'm so glad I chose it as an A-level! Don't believe people who say you will instantly get a U. Lots of people feel intimidated by the step up from GCSE to A-level with languages but in my experience it is not too bad at all. The only thing that is quite different is that the speaking exam is much more spontaneous but as long as you practise this skill throughout the year it is fine. I honestly got so nervous before my AS speaking exam but it turned out absolutely fine and actually quite enjoyable! Don't be nervous, it is such an interesting and beneficial A-level and if you enjoy it now you will love A-level Also I am the only one in my family who speaks French too!
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Anna Schoon
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(Original post by caitlinford3)
I'm currently in Year 11 and I've put French as one of my options, I'm an A* student in French and I absolutely love it but I've heard people say it's close to impossible if your family isn't native French (and I'm the only one in my family who speaks any remote French)

Will I instantly get a U or ?? how hard is it ?
Just to repeat what I said earlier on another thread because I think it may be helpful:

Speaking as a teacher I can confirm that the jump from GCSE to A level is a big one. The good news is that you can prepare for it during the summer holiday after your GCSEs.

The biggest issue is verbs and tenses. If you can make sure that you can at least conjugate all the tenses (regular and the most common irregular verbs) that are on the GCSE syllabus (that doesn't mean that you'll have done them; a lot of teachers don't bother) then you'll be doing yourself a huge favour. These are the tenses you should know before you embark on the A level course:

Simple tenses: Present, imperfect, future, conditional
Compound tenses: Passé composé, pluperfect.

You should also have a good idea about when to use these tenses.

It is also a good idea to practise agreements with adjectives as well as their position.

If you can, get hold of this book: http://www.amazon.co.uk/French-Gramm.../dp/095706120X. The first chapter is a really good introduction to concepts of grammar which you will need for the A level course, and it has loads of explanations and exercises for tenses, adjectives and more - it will see you through your A level course. I work with this book with my students and I find it invaluable.

Another thing you can do to help doesn't even involve French. The A level course is topic based and you need to have quite a wide general knowledge of the world around you - health, social issues, the environment, technology, moral questions are all part of the syllabus. So it helps to just read a good quality newspaper every day.
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IzzyReeves
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Hi, I'm currently in year 12 doing French and I got an A at GCSE. I think the main thing I've noticed so far is that you can't cram like you can for other subjects, you have to be motivated and do it bit by bit regularly. So far I'm finding most of my course okay except the speaking but i have anxiety so that's partially why and my friends are finding speaking fine. I'd suggest talking to your current French teacher if you have any questions as I think the course is changing starting this September (:



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GeologyMaths
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Difficulty

GCSE 1/10
AS 3/10
A2 7.5/10
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glowanti
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(Original post by cherrycola98)
I am in Year 13 and I absolutely love French and have done all the way through school. I was also an A* student in Year 11, and I'm so glad I chose it as an A-level! Don't believe people who say you will instantly get a U. Lots of people feel intimidated by the step up from GCSE to A-level with languages but in my experience it is not too bad at all. The only thing that is quite different is that the speaking exam is much more spontaneous but as long as you practise this skill throughout the year it is fine. I honestly got so nervous before my AS speaking exam but it turned out absolutely fine and actually quite enjoyable! Don't be nervous, it is such an interesting and beneficial A-level and if you enjoy it now you will love A-level Also I am the only one in my family who speaks French too!
Thank you very much you've shed some confidence on me haha!


(Original post by IzzyReeves)
Hi, I'm currently in year 12 doing French and I got an A at GCSE. I think the main thing I've noticed so far is that you can't cram like you can for other subjects, you have to be motivated and do it bit by bit regularly. So far I'm finding most of my course okay except the speaking but i have anxiety so that's partially why and my friends are finding speaking fine. I'd suggest talking to your current French teacher if you have any questions as I think the course is changing starting this September (:

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Yeah you're right the course is changing! My school doesn't offer A-Level French so I'm going elsewhere and they've told me about the change in course. Very true about the cramming I find that at GCSE for the reading exam too as you can't really learn a language overnight haha!


(Original post by GeologyMaths)
Difficulty

GCSE 1/10
AS 3/10
A2 7.5/10
Ah well that's promising!
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glowanti
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(Original post by Anna Schoon)
Just to repeat what I said earlier on another thread because I think it may be helpful:

Speaking as a teacher I can confirm that the jump from GCSE to A level is a big one. The good news is that you can prepare for it during the summer holiday after your GCSEs.

The biggest issue is verbs and tenses. If you can make sure that you can at least conjugate all the tenses (regular and the most common irregular verbs) that are on the GCSE syllabus (that doesn't mean that you'll have done them; a lot of teachers don't bother) then you'll be doing yourself a huge favour. These are the tenses you should know before you embark on the A level course:

Simple tenses: Present, imperfect, future, conditional
Compound tenses: Passé composé, pluperfect.

You should also have a good idea about when to use these tenses.

It is also a good idea to practise agreements with adjectives as well as their position.

If you can, get hold of this book: http://www.amazon.co.uk/French-Gramm.../dp/095706120X. The first chapter is a really good introduction to concepts of grammar which you will need for the A level course, and it has loads of explanations and exercises for tenses, adjectives and more - it will see you through your A level course. I work with this book with my students and I find it invaluable.

Another thing you can do to help doesn't even involve French. The A level course is topic based and you need to have quite a wide general knowledge of the world around you - health, social issues, the environment, technology, moral questions are all part of the syllabus. So it helps to just read a good quality newspaper every day.

Thank you for your help! I will definitely look into working on my tenses and buying the book you recommended!
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rileystringer1
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(Original post by GeologyMaths)
Difficulty

GCSE 1/10
AS 3/10
A2 7.5/10
Don't agree personally. I'd say GCSE was 0/10 in terms of difficulty, I never felt strained I just did the exams/got my controlled assessments marked and learned them. I'd say AS was 1-1.5/10, did nothing for the oral, for the written paper I wrote one good essay during the year and luckily it came up so I tried to remember it in the exam and got 34/35 marks for it which I guess was luck, not hard work. Felt very strained at AS by the amount of work I thought I had to do, so I ended up doing none and got an A

For A2 I'd say 4-5/10, to get a good grade you do have to work i.e. practicing translations, improving your essay writing skills but you can easily wing it by doing just a tiny bit of work every so often (as I do and got an A in my mock last week)

But each to their own. If you're good at French (for your level) and "enjoy" it (as in you don't hate it) then it's an easy subject to do. I think that just going to lesson and hearing French is like revision
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GeologyMaths
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(Original post by rileystringer1)
Don't agree personally. I'd say GCSE was 0/10 in terms of difficulty, I never felt strained I just did the exams/got my controlled assessments marked and learned them. I'd say AS was 1-1.5/10, did nothing for the oral, for the written paper I wrote one good essay during the year and luckily it came up so I tried to remember it in the exam and got 34/35 marks for it which I guess was luck, not hard work. Felt very strained at AS by the amount of work I thought I had to do, so I ended up doing none and got an A

For A2 I'd say 4-5/10, to get a good grade you do have to work i.e. practicing translations, improving your essay writing skills but you can easily wing it by doing just a tiny bit of work every so often (as I do and got an A in my mock last week)

But each to their own. If you're good at French (for your level) and "enjoy" it (as in you don't hate it) then it's an easy subject to do. I think that just going to lesson and hearing French is like revision
If GCSE is 0/10, how can A Levels be anything higher than 0 lol?
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GeologyMaths
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(Original post by rileystringer1)
Don't agree personally. I'd say GCSE was 0/10 in terms of difficulty, I never felt strained I just did the exams/got my controlled assessments marked and learned them. I'd say AS was 1-1.5/10, did nothing for the oral, for the written paper I wrote one good essay during the year and luckily it came up so I tried to remember it in the exam and got 34/35 marks for it which I guess was luck, not hard work. Felt very strained at AS by the amount of work I thought I had to do, so I ended up doing none and got an A

For A2 I'd say 4-5/10, to get a good grade you do have to work i.e. practicing translations, improving your essay writing skills but you can easily wing it by doing just a tiny bit of work every so often (as I do and got an A in my mock last week)

But each to their own. If you're good at French (for your level) and "enjoy" it (as in you don't hate it) then it's an easy subject to do. I think that just going to lesson and hearing French is like revision
Got Max also in the writing lol
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rileystringer1
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(Original post by GeologyMaths)
If GCSE is 0/10, how can A Levels be anything higher than 0 lol?
C'est-à-dire?

(Original post by GeologyMaths)
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Got Max also in the writing lol
Don't understand what the image signifies
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glowanti
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(Original post by rileystringer1)
Don't agree personally. I'd say GCSE was 0/10 in terms of difficulty, I never felt strained I just did the exams/got my controlled assessments marked and learned them. I'd say AS was 1-1.5/10, did nothing for the oral, for the written paper I wrote one good essay during the year and luckily it came up so I tried to remember it in the exam and got 34/35 marks for it which I guess was luck, not hard work. Felt very strained at AS by the amount of work I thought I had to do, so I ended up doing none and got an A

For A2 I'd say 4-5/10, to get a good grade you do have to work i.e. practicing translations, improving your essay writing skills but you can easily wing it by doing just a tiny bit of work every so often (as I do and got an A in my mock last week)

But each to their own. If you're good at French (for your level) and "enjoy" it (as in you don't hate it) then it's an easy subject to do. I think that just going to lesson and hearing French is like revision
Totally agree that hearing French / going to lesson is just revision! I can't imagine how some people possibly think cramming a language (??) the night before an exam will work! But at the moment I can agree I find the GCSE papers extremely easy and I am coming out with A*'s near to full marks without revising simply because I do surround myself so much with the language because I love it so much. I will take on board your word - thank you!
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