Please could you help me with a simple word equation?

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blobbybill
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Sodium hydroxide + phosphoric acid -> sodium phosphate and water

I understand that acid+alkali>salt and water
I also understand that if it was sodium hydroxide + nitric acid it would still become sodium phosphate and water.

However, what if the equation was the following, what would the salt be?
1) Sodium Chloride + phosphoric acid > ? + water
2) Sodium Chloride + sulfuric acid -> ? + water
3) Potassium nitrate + sulfuric acid -> ? + water


I am struggling to remember how to form the product in the word equations and what it would be called with different alkalis such as chlorides, nitrates, etc.
Please could someone answer the 3 above questions to help me? And maybe even explain how the name of the ending salt in the equation is formed so that I can understand how it changes with names of different alkalis.

Thank you so much!
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blobbybill
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Hype en Ecosse
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The important thing to remember is that acids disocciated into their base, and their H+ component. So phosphoric acid splits into [HPO4-] + H+, this means that there's a spare bond left on the base for a positive ion to connect to. In your examples, the sodium and potassium are the positive ion components of their lattices. So Sodium chloride + phosphoric acid becomes SODIUM PHOSPHATE and water. Can you work out the rest?
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PharaohFromSpace
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(Original post by blobbybill)
Sodium hydroxide + phosphoric acid -> sodium phosphate and water

I understand that acid+alkali>salt and water
I also understand that if it was sodium hydroxide + nitric acid it would still become sodium phosphate and water.

However, what if the equation was the following, what would the salt be?
1) Sodium Chloride + phosphoric acid > ? + water
2) Sodium Chloride + sulfuric acid -> ? + water
3) Potassium nitrate + sulfuric acid -> ? + water


I am struggling to remember how to form the product in the word equations and what it would be called with different alkalis such as chlorides, nitrates, etc.
Please could someone answer the 3 above questions to help me? And maybe even explain how the name of the ending salt in the equation is formed so that I can understand how it changes with names of different alkalis.

Thank you so much!
Sodium hydroxide + nitric acid is sodium nitrate.

1) sodium phosphate
2) sodium sulfate
3) poyassium sulfate

(Assuming all the above reactions are feasible)
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differentiate1
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(Original post by blobbybill)
Sodium hydroxide + phosphoric acid -> sodium phosphate and water

I understand that acid+alkali>salt and water
I also understand that if it was sodium hydroxide + nitric acid it would still become sodium phosphate and water.

However, what if the equation was the following, what would the salt be?
1) Sodium Chloride + phosphoric acid > ? + water
2) Sodium Chloride + sulfuric acid -> ? + water
3) Potassium nitrate + sulfuric acid -> ? + water


I am struggling to remember how to form the product in the word equations and what it would be called with different alkalis such as chlorides, nitrates, etc.
Please could someone answer the 3 above questions to help me? And maybe even explain how the name of the ending salt in the equation is formed so that I can understand how it changes with names of different alkalis.

Thank you so much!
I think it's the following.

1)Sodium phosphate + Hydrochloric acid
2) Sodium sulfate + Hydrochloric acid
3) Potassium sulfate + Nitric acid

I'd explain it better but I'm on the train right now. Hope this helps.
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PharaohFromSpace
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(Original post by blobbybill)
please?
(Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
The important thing to remember is that acids disocciated into their base, and their H+ component. So phosphoric acid splits into [HPO4-] + H+, this means that there's a spare bond left on the base for a positive ion to connect to. In your examples, the sodium and potassium are the positive ion components of their lattices. So Sodium chloride + phosphoric acid becomes SODIUM PHOSPHATE and water. Can you work out the rest?
Plus this a really good explanation ^
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blobbybill
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(Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
The important thing to remember is that acids disocciated into their base, and their H+ component. So phosphoric acid splits into [HPO4-] + H+, this means that there's a spare bond left on the base for a positive ion to connect to. In your examples, the sodium and potassium are the positive ion components of their lattices. So Sodium chloride + phosphoric acid becomes SODIUM PHOSPHATE and water. Can you work out the rest?
Thanks, this helps a lot I get that there is a spare bond left on the base for a positive ion to connect to, but:
1) Which substance is the base onto which the positive ion connects to?
2) How come it becomes water just because it gains an extra positive ion, and why? Why not just the same substance but with an extra positive ion, or another substance instead of water?
Thanks
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Hype en Ecosse
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(Original post by blobbybill)
Thanks, this helps a lot I get that there is a spare bond left on the base for a positive ion to connect to, but:
1) Which substance is the base onto which the positive ion connects to?
2) How come it becomes water just because it gains an extra positive ion, and why? Why not just the same substance but with an extra positive ion, or another substance instead of water?
Thanks
Small note about my response: I actually made a mistake - another user is right that it's sodium HYDROXIDE that would make water, NaCl would indeed make HCl (it's a while since I've done chemistry).

The base is always what is left over after dissociation. Acids always dissociate into hydrogen ions, plus their "base". This is the "main bit" of the acid that makes it unique. In phosphoric acid, it's phosphate. In sulphuric acid, it's sulphate. And so on for every other acid.

In the case of hydroxide salts (I'll use NaOH as an example), these make water as a by product because that's what's left over. NaOH splits into Na+ + OH-. An acid will split onto H+ + base-. Then you just match up the positives and negatives. It becomes NaBase + HOH <-- also known as water!

In the case of the chlorides, as in your example, we have Na + Cl sitting by, and after "matching up" charges you get NaBase + HCl <--- hydrochloric acid



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