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    I've enjoyed French for over 3 years now and am currently taking it for GCSE and I would like to take it for A-Level except I'm worried I don't know enough or that the jump from GCSE to A-Level will big bigger than I anticipate. Can anyone help?
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    (Original post by xhannahmariex)
    I've enjoyed French for over 3 years now and am currently taking it for GCSE and I would like to take it for A-Level except I'm worried I don't know enough or that the jump from GCSE to A-Level will big bigger than I anticipate. Can anyone help?
    Speaking as a teacher I can confirm that the jump from GCSE to A level is a big one. The good news is that you can prepare for it during the summer holiday after your GCSEs.

    The biggest issue is verbs and tenses. If you can make sure that you can at least conjugate all the tenses (regular and the most common irregular verbs) that are on the GCSE syllabus (that doesn't mean that you'll have done them; a lot of teachers don't bother) then you'll be doing yourself a huge favour. These are the tenses you should know before you embark on the A level course:

    Simple tenses: Present, imperfect, future, conditional
    Compound tenses: Passé composé, pluperfect.

    You should also have a good idea about when to use these tenses.

    It is also a good idea to practise agreements with adjectives as well as their position.

    If you can, get hold of this book: http://www.amazon.co.uk/French-Gramm.../dp/095706120X. The first chapter is a really good introduction to concepts of grammar which you will need for the A level course, and it has loads of explanations and exercises for tenses, adjectives and more - it will see you through your A level course. I work with this book with my students and I find it invaluable.

    Another thing you can do to help doesn't even involve French. The A level course is topic based and you need to have quite a wide general knowledge of the world around you - health, social issues, the environment, technology, moral questions are all part of the syllabus. So it helps to just read a good quality newspaper every day.
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    (Original post by Anna Schoon)
    Speaking as a teacher I can confirm that the jump from GCSE to A level is a big one. The good news is that you can prepare for it during the summer holiday after your GCSEs.

    The biggest issue is verbs and tenses. If you can make sure that you can at least conjugate all the tenses (regular and the most common irregular verbs) that are on the GCSE syllabus (that doesn't mean that you'll have done them; a lot of teachers don't bother) then you'll be doing yourself a huge favour. These are the tenses you should know before you embark on the A level course:

    Simple tenses: Present, imperfect, future, conditional
    Compound tenses: Passé composé, pluperfect.

    You should also have a good idea about when to use these tenses.

    It is also a good idea to practise agreements with adjectives as well as their position.

    If you can, get hold of this book: http://www.amazon.co.uk/French-Gramm.../dp/095706120X. The first chapter is a really good introduction to concepts of grammar which you will need for the A level course, and it has loads of explanations and exercises for tenses, adjectives and more - it will see you through your A level course. I work with this book with my students and I find it invaluable.

    Another thing you can do to help doesn't even involve French. The A level course is topic based and you need to have quite a wide general knowledge of the world around you - health, social issues, the environment, technology, moral questions are all part of the syllabus. So it helps to just read a good quality newspaper every day.
    Thank you this was really helpful
 
 
 
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