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    (Original post by j.98)
    so really there is no definitive answer and it all depends but at the end of the day, the better uni, the higher the chance of success in life?
    The short answer is yes. Although when comparing top unis, excluding Oxbridge the difference is very small, for example UCL > Warwick for everything except Maths but an Econ degree from both will have almost the same chances of success. So when talking about 2 unis that aren't on opposite ends of the spectrum, the prospects are what you make them.
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    Do the one you think you'll enjoy more.

    But if you want a job in economics you could potentially get that with an engineering degree. You won't be able to get an engineering job with economics.

    Personally I think economics is probably more fun and I do engineering. But I guess it's subjective.
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    (Original post by slb971)
    Engineering imo. Most prestigious financial jobs like IB can still be applied for with an Engineering degree, for IB in particular I'd say that uni matters more than course so focus on getting the best grades you can to go to a very good uni. Econ is really limited outside the financial sector, this is where engineering shines through as being so much more versatile and having more options open to you. Overall, I'd say Maths is the most versatile degree, then Engineering (depending on the discipline you want to go in).
    I think Engineering is more versatile than Maths. You can't do engineering jobs with a maths degree. A lot of research jobs you can't do with maths too, it needs to be a science like Chemistry, Biology and Engineering. Both can do accountancy, economics jobs. And other jobs were you need just a science (or some jobs any degree). I can't think of many jobs where you can only do with just a maths degree. Even teaching, you can do with an engineering degree, quite a few of my teachers at school were engineers. Engineers also tend to learn broader concepts, they learn a bit of finance, science, industrial application, maths etc. Jack of all trades master of none perhaps (well except for engineering), but it does mean you can apply to more jobs.

    Maths is a tougher course though. I often feel like if you can do Maths, you could do engineering. I think a lot of engineers would struggle to complete Maths degrees. And I say this as an engineer.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    What do you actually want to do when you're older?
    sit somewhere nice in a warm climate (australia maybe) with a cold drink

    but realistically I want to be happy and have the money to fund amazing experiences
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    (Original post by Rotom)
    I think Engineering is more versatile than Maths. You can't do engineering jobs with a maths degree. A lot of research jobs you can't do with maths too, it needs to be a science like Chemistry, Biology and Engineering. Both can do accountancy, economics jobs. And other jobs were you need just a science (or some jobs any degree). I can't think of many jobs where you can only do with just a maths degree. Even teaching, you can do with an engineering degree, quite a few of my teachers at school were engineers. Engineers also tend to learn broader concepts, they learn a bit of finance, science, industrial application, maths etc. Jack of all trades master of none perhaps (well except for engineering), but it does mean you can apply to more jobs.

    Maths is a tougher course though. I often feel like if you can do Maths, you could do engineering. I think a lot of engineers would struggle to complete Maths degrees. And I say this as an engineer.
    As an engineer so post grad? or still studying
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    (Original post by j.98)
    As an engineer so post grad? or still studying
    Engineering student who's already done an internship. And I've done plenty of looking for jobs and stuff and internships so I think I'm right. Course I could be wrong, ask a maths student. But IB, banking, finance, research, engineering, teaching, business I know can all be done with an engineering degree. I know some times of research (especially science fields) and engineering of course can not be done with maths.
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    (Original post by j.98)
    sit somewhere nice in a warm climate (australia maybe) with a cold drink

    but realistically I want to be happy and have the money to fund amazing experiences
    Both can provide the above.

    Are you technically minded?
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    (Original post by j.98)
    As an engineer so post grad? or still studying
    I think also part of the reason why Engineering is more versatile as it is something that trains you for a specific job. You have to do engineering to do engineering as a job generally. It's not the same for maths, it's not a vocational degree. I guess it's the same thing with medicine for example, you probably could apply to other jobs as well as medicine but of course virtually no one who does medicine doesn't go into medicine. It's a little different in engineering where lots go to different fields upon graduating.
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    (Original post by Rotom)
    I think Engineering is more versatile than Maths. You can't do engineering jobs with a maths degree. A lot of research jobs you can't do with maths too, it needs to be a science like Chemistry, Biology and Engineering. Both can do accountancy, economics jobs. And other jobs were you need just a science (or some jobs any degree). I can't think of many jobs where you can only do with just a maths degree. Even teaching, you can do with an engineering degree, quite a few of my teachers at school were engineers. Engineers also tend to learn broader concepts, they learn a bit of finance, science, industrial application, maths etc. Jack of all trades master of none perhaps (well except for engineering), but it does mean you can apply to more jobs.

    Maths is a tougher course though. I often feel like if you can do Maths, you could do engineering. I think a lot of engineers would struggle to complete Maths degrees. And I say this as an engineer.
    Fair enough you're right I didn't think my post through fully haha. I was thinking more to do with software developer jobs and in that industry working at the big companies like Google/Microsoft/Facebook etc. alot of them want either software engineering/comp sci grads or maths, not alot of them will take mechanical engineers or chemical engineers etc
    Btw out of curiosity, how hard is it to secure internships in 1st/2nd year of an engineering degree? I'll be going to study chem eng this September and would kind of like to dabble around in each industry I could see myself having a career in by getting multiple internships, is it possible?
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    (Original post by slb971)
    Fair enough you're right I didn't think my post through fully haha. I was thinking more to do with software developer jobs and in that industry working at the big companies like Google/Microsoft/Facebook etc. alot of them want either software engineering/comp sci grads or maths, not alot of them will take mechanical engineers or chemical engineers etc
    Btw out of curiosity, how hard is it to secure internships in 1st/2nd year of an engineering degree? I'll be going to study chem eng this September and would kind of like to dabble around in each industry I could see myself having a career in by getting multiple internships, is it possible?
    haha I do chem eng. It's not too hard to get one especially a year one tbh. Just aim to get 60% (though people can get them below that too). Most people only really get one or none. But yeah you could get multiple internships especially if you do MEng, four years because you'll have time. Though just because you did an internship in one field, doesn't mean it won't look good applying to other fields.

    For example I did mine in oil and gas (mainly around oil, I didn't do anything with gas). I don't want to do oil in the future (though seems like everyone wants to do that in my course lol because the pay is extremely good), but it'll look good applying to other jobs. For example one woman who had a job at an oil and gas company said she did her internship in a car company before successfully applying and getting the job in oil and gas. So don't worry about that too much.

    As for software engineering, not sure that's true a lot do accept engineers. Maybe some don't I guess but not all. It's more about learning the relevant software, and once you've done that you can move around companies. My dad works in IT and there are plenty of engineers he works with. The software that you use in actual career often isn't the software you learn at university too (for example SAP). So it's not like a lot of the guys fresh out of uni even know what they're doing, they have to be trained yet again. And I'm also guessing that the ones who want you to specialise usually want computer science not maths anyway. I mean I've just done a search for facebook jobs and found ones accepting engineers. And especially there are quite a few jobs in these sort of companies who need electrical engineers.

    I presume perhaps someone with computer science is going to look a little more impressive to computing companies as it's their relevant field but in terms of versatility engineers can still apply to quite a few companies/jobs in that field.
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    Engineering, but you won't be the same ever again after finishing it
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    I was like you back in high school, really wanted to do an economics/business related degree but stuck to my original dream of mechanical engineering....have hated the experience so far If you just want money, both will give you that eventually, but driving a lambo at 40 is hilariously unrealistic unless you start your own business!

    Word of advice though, don't do what you think you'll make the most money of, money isn't everything (I know from personal experience) and there's no point doing something you don't enjoy. Do a degree in something you love, you'll be a lot happier than instead of being rich doing **** you don't like!
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    if you are reasonably good at mathematics, do engineering. it has much better career prospects than economics.
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    (Original post by Rotom)
    haha I do chem eng. It's not too hard to get one especially a year one tbh. Just aim to get 60% (though people can get them below that too). Most people only really get one or none. But yeah you could get multiple internships especially if you do MEng, four years because you'll have time. Though just because you did an internship in one field, doesn't mean it won't look good applying to other fields.

    For example I did mine in oil and gas (mainly around oil, I didn't do anything with gas). I don't want to do oil in the future (though seems like everyone wants to do that in my course lol because the pay is extremely good), but it'll look good applying to other jobs. For example one woman who had a job at an oil and gas company said she did her internship in a car company before successfully applying and getting the job in oil and gas. So don't worry about that too much.

    As for software engineering, not sure that's true a lot do accept engineers. Maybe some don't I guess but not all. It's more about learning the relevant software, and once you've done that you can move around companies. My dad works in IT and there are plenty of engineers he works with. The software that you use in actual career often isn't the software you learn at university too (for example SAP). So it's not like a lot of the guys fresh out of uni even know what they're doing, they have to be trained yet again. And I'm also guessing that the ones who want you to specialise usually want computer science not maths anyway. I mean I've just done a search for facebook jobs and found ones accepting engineers. And especially there are quite a few jobs in these sort of companies who need electrical engineers.

    I presume perhaps someone with computer science is going to look a little more impressive to computing companies as it's their relevant field but in terms of versatility engineers can still apply to quite a few companies/jobs in that field.
    You seem to know alot about the field, thanks for taking the time to reply, helped alot!
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    (Original post by shawtyb)
    no actually, essex uni and before you start, im not from essex.
    however this is not a graded essay or dissertation and im not being marked for grammar or understanding of questions or statements therefore i dont need to write like i am

    maybe if you directed your reply and specifically mentioned which part was aimed at which person, people may understand
    I hate when people feel the need to nit pick someones spelling, were not writing essays and being marked! Its a forum..
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    (Original post by captainncc1701)
    Engineering, but you won't be the same ever again after finishing it
    hahaha won't be the same? for better or worse?
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    (Original post by BlackSweetness)
    I hate when people feel the need to nit pick someones spelling, were not writing essays and being marked! Its a forum..
    thankyou!!
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    (Original post by j.98)
    hahaha won't be the same? for better or worse?
    It's 50/50 lol

    If you are going to for it, it won't be easy....but it'll pay off for sure.
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    (Original post by maximo17000)
    I want to do mechanical engineering at uni. Consider what is more important to you: having a penthouse in london and driving a lambo round town by the time you're 40 but being bored to death with the job you do or having a job which is exciting and which is always changing and you get to discover new things while earning a moderate amount of money.

    you will make a lot more money if you are good at economics and go into something like wealth management, banking or accountancy but i garuntee you will enjoy engineering more.

    btw i know someone who studied economics at uni, cant rember what he went into but he made 50,000 in his first year of work plus a 100,000 bonus
    There are no repetitions in either career, banking changes constantly as well. It's influenced by politics, the markets and the state of the economy. Have you not heard about the turmoil right now?

    They are both exciting careers to lead, it just depends on what you are most interested in.
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    (Original post by j.98)
    I'm currently halfway through my first year of a levels and starting to think about what to take at uni.

    I'm stuck between something related to mechanical engineering or economics?
    any help or thoughts would be great
    I suggest work experience at both OP. They are pretty different careers, there are many roles within a bank. Trading/Research/Technology/Risk/Wealth or Asset Management/Corporate Banking/ Investment Banking which splits into a number of divisions and product groups...the list goes on.

    That's just in a bank, there are a number of other financial institutions you can join including government, if public sector is where your interests lie. Or outside of this, you can convert it into politics or law and specialise in corporate law. The legal team often work with investment banks on deals.

    It's still a fairly versatile degree, it probably won't land you an engineering job, but there's other options outside of the financial services.

    Economics at degree level is very different from A level, it's theoretical but there is also quite a lot of maths incorporated, including derivations of the equations of models. Depending on your course, you could be learning how to use a software, some of these institutions use.

    As I said before, you need to figure out what you really enjoy. Both are tough careers to break into, and are very competitive for jobs.
 
 
 
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