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Why are more and more people going to University if graduate unemployment is high? Watch

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    The fact that 86.8% of "young" (i.e 21-30 yr old) graduates are employed is irrelevant. People would want to know what their prospects would be immediately after graduation

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    (Original post by TSRFT8)
    So you are implying that a Oxbridge graduate and a DMU graduate have the same chance of getting graduate employment? Please do continue to prove such a stupid point.
    Yawn, can trolls at least try to be original?
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    (Original post by Most Competitive)
    The fact that 86.8% of "young" (i.e 21-30 yr old) graduates are employed is irrelevant. People would want to know what their prospects would be immediately after graduation
    Well then they can look at the DLHE data published on http://www.unistats.ac.uk for every course - that's graduate activity 6 months after graduating.

    Although you'd be advised to read: http://wonkhe.com/blogs/employability-johnsons-tef/

    Immediate employment stats <> employability.
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    (Original post by TSRFT8)
    So you are implying that a Oxbridge graduate and a DMU graduate have the same chance of getting graduate employment? Please do continue to prove such a stupid point.
    Looking at http://www.thecompleteuniversityguid...ospects&v=wide

    Oxford 92.1% of graduates got a 1st or 2i | 81.9% of graduates were in graduate level employment or study
    De Montfort 70.9% of graduates got a 1st or 2i | 68.7% of graduates were in graduate level employment or study

    There's an argument that Oxford are failing their graduates with nearly 20% not in grad study/work but only 8% didn't get a good degree classification.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Well then they can look at the DLHE data published on http://www.unistats.ac.uk for every course - that's graduate activity 6 months after graduating.

    Although you'd be advised to read: http://wonkhe.com/blogs/employability-johnsons-tef/

    Immediate employment stats <> employability.
    People go to university with a view to secure employment shortly after graduating.

    The fact that graduates command more respect and higher salaries is undeniable; but you also have to consider the merits of starting full-time work as opposed to attending university. Employers are, after all, more inclined to choose an experienced individual over a fresh grad with little-no work experience.
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    (Original post by Most Competitive)
    People go to university with a view to secure employment shortly after graduating.

    The fact that graduates command more respect and higher salaries is undeniable; but you also have to consider the merits of starting full-time work as opposed to attending university. Employers are, after all, more inclined to choose an experienced individual over a fresh grad with little-no work experience.
    Except the stats don't bear that statement out. Graduates are more likely to be employed, less likely to be unemployed, more likely to be in a professional job and more likely to ear more money than non-graduates.

    That's not to say that some graduates don't do **** all with their degree and that some non-graduates don't do very well without one. Overall there is still a statistically significant premium to having a degree.

    As for your statement that "People go to university with a view to secure employment shortly after graduating."
    Please read the WonkHE article linked -
    "the fact of whether someone has got a job is only distantly related to what they have learnt as a result of teaching. If they were the same, it would suggest that when students graduate in a recession and struggle to find work, it must be because their teaching had got worse. That’s obviously not the case."

    "We shouldn’t be measuring employment. We should measure employability. They’re not the same. When employment falls, such as in a recession, employability often rises as people acquire new knowledge or skills to make themselves more competitive. Employability is the ability to get, keep and succeed in jobs you want – both now and in the future as the economy shifts."
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    because the alternative is working in retail or being a picker etc. **** jobs where you are poorly treated and paid **** all.

    Also learning about a subject is worth doing it for its own sake.
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    Two reasons I can think of.

    1. The whole University 'experience' is highly coveted. We have all been influenced by society to have the aspiration to attend university.

    - 'loads of fun'
    - 'friends for life'
    - 'fall in love'
    - a degree that will open doors at the end of it.

    Most would admit that these expectations are unrealistic.


    2. You sort of need a degree.

    They are no longer really a display of intellectual prowess that would have once separated you from others.
    Many people have them. A degree has sort of replaced A Levels and jobs that once would have been open to somebody with decent A Levels now require a degree.

    You limit your options without one. Unfair really.
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    "The National Employer Skills Survey (NESS) 2007 reported that in Englandover a quarter of establishments (27%) consider that new labour market entrants at 16were poorly prepared for work, 21% that 17 to 18 year old new labour market entrantswere poorly prepared and 10% that HE graduates were (LSC, 2008)."

    https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...-_Nov_2008.pdf

    Just 10% of employers this HE graduates are poorly prepared for work...based on TSR threads you'd think it was 75-90%.
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    (Original post by callum_law)
    I want the easy money, that's why.
    and the easy poon.
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    alternatives are dont look as credible... how many mps done an apprenticeship,better yet how many successful people can you name without a degree and they are not in the entertainment industry?

    We need to make the youth know that they can get a good salary if they dont go uni but unfortunately this starts at the top...i doubt if david cameron had the choice between sending his children to uni or an apprenticeship hed choose the latter plus apprenticeships still look less secure than a degree to the majority....
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    University could change to a torture chamber and thousands would still sign up. Kids are pushed into it with no alternative shown or encouraged, it what normal non very unintelligent people do. No longer a place for the brightest, but a place for anyone thats not in the bottom 25%
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    Because there are so many people with degrees now it is seen as the standard. The same way you would think a kid with 0 GCSEs is pretty stupid, employers think if you don't have a degree you must be thick as **** as it is now the common thing
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    PQ is absolutely dominating this thread, incredible posts - PRSOM

    Making everyone else on here look very silly
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    (Original post by TunaTunnel)
    and the easy poon.
    It's a good life.
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    (Original post by ComputerMaths97)
    I said prospects not employment rates. On stupidly long hours and crappy pay, yeah, "pretty amazing"
    It's a job which only those that have passion for people should do.
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    (Original post by Quantex)
    Youth unemployment is far higher than unemployment for young graduates. The rise in fees doesn't matter too much. If you don't go on to earn much after your degree, like many doing crappy degrees at crappy universities, then you can expect the tax payer to pick up the tab.
    I agree there are not worthwhile degrees, but there is nothing, absolutely nothing as "crappy" Universities, they wouldn't function if they were "crappy". Universities are standardized for a reason. Take biomedical science for example, most IBMS universities or "crappy" ones as you say are accredited, meaning you don't have to do a top up to meet the IBMS requirement, which eases the pathway into being full qualified. Why would IBMS certified these "crappy" universities then? :rolleyes:

    NB: I know someone from Londonmet (shock horror :eek:) who has a job at Glaxosmithkline. I guess the "crappy" University they attended was not "crappy" after all then, if someone from Russell group or non "crappy" Universities cannot even find a job, talk less of being a scientist for Glaxosmithkline.

    Most student on TSR really are living in a fairy tale of Russell group Universities/ degree prestige :lol:. At the end of the day, experience is all that matters, no one cares what Universities you got your degree from :lol:
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    (Original post by Betelgeuse-)
    University could change to a torture chamber and thousands would still sign up. Kids are pushed into it with no alternative shown or encouraged, it what normal non very unintelligent people do. No longer a place for the brightest, but a place for anyone thats not in the bottom 25%
    You've got your percentages wrong there. HE participation for 18-30 year olds has only just hit 49% - and that includes everyone getting HNDs/HNCs/early exit awards/foundation degrees/BTEC level 4/5 diplomas.

    The majority of 18 year olds do not go to university and the majority of 21 year olds are not graduates.

    Implying that 75% of people have degrees just reflects on how narrow your social circle is if that is your perception.
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    (Original post by TSRFT8)
    You used one example meanwhile the majority of the other graduates from **** unis are still asking if i would like to go large for 30p extra now shut up.
    :lol: I know many others. Do grow up!
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    imo people are brainwashed into thinking that if they don't get a degree, then you wont ever get a good job. At my school and sixform at least we were only ever told about the opportunities at university not other alternatives like college courses, apprenticeships or going straight into work, in fact these were discouraged. Also they are constantly told that the student loan debt doesnt matter as its not even a proper loan (I disagree tbh).


    For me, I went to university because I want at least a taste of physics research (want to do a phd) which requires a physics degree. While I am well aware that after the phd, chances are I wont get any further in academic research, I would hope to go into industry research in some form.

    I think it just depends on who you are around too that influences what you think are options. example had I not wanted to go to uni to do physics then I would of done a engineering apprenticeship as my family made me aware of this option and I looked into it alot before making a more informed decision on what path to take. However I have a friend that was told that university was the only path and that any other path is only for dumb people (I totally disagree) but I guess if thats all he has been told then its all he knows. but he also thinks if you dont do science/engineering at a russel group then you dont have a worthwhile degree (hes quite snobby tbh)
    Tell your friend if you're not doing STEM at a G5 uni, your degree is worthless.
 
 
 
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