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    I'm just wondering what everyone does when walking past a homeless person either on the street or selling the big issue. Do you acknowledge them with eye contact, a smile, give them money or say 'Sorry I have no change'. If you do give them money do you speak to them or engage?

    The reason I ask is because I'm doing some research in my home city on this and exploring how society acknowledges or ignores the homeless and why.

    Do you feel guilty when you walk past, do you care? What are your thoughts?
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    (Original post by EtherealNymph22)
    I'm just wondering what everyone does when walking past a homeless person either on the street or selling the big issue. Do you acknowledge them with eye contact, a smile, give them money or say 'Sorry I have no change'. If you do give them money do you speak to them or engage?

    The reason I ask is because I'm doing some research in my home city on this and exploring how society acknowledges or ignores the homeless and why.

    Do you feel guilty when you walk past, do you care? What are your thoughts?
    Once I have given homeless person some money, after few minutes, he walked out of the shop with a bottle of beer.

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    I'm more likely to walk past them and use my phone to make a thread about walking past a homeless person than engage with them.
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    Sometimes I engage, sometimes I don't. Rarely I give money, most of time I don't.
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    Sometimes I try to acknowledge them and say sorry, but I always feel guilty, even if I know it's not my fault.
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    I look at them with pity and sometimes give food/money but usually I ignore them as I find them threatening.
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    I never give them money or buy a big issue but I just say no rather than ignore them. Not because I am a heartless person but I have no money myself.
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    (Original post by AliRizzo)
    Sometimes I try to acknowledge them and say sorry, but I always feel guilty, even if I know it's not my fault.
    I understand this, I find it really hard. I acknowledge every homeless person I see- irrelevant of whether I give them money and quite a few of them have said to me that they are so grateful I even spoke to them because everyone just ignores them.

    A particular guy I will never forget. He stands on Liverpool street in the mornings selling the Big Issue and he looks so kind and nice. He says 'hello good morning' to absolutely everyone- doesn't ask them to buy the Big Issue. and so many people just continue walking and don't acknowledge him. I understand why people don't but I think that as well as getting out of their situation financially they also need hope and we have the power to give them it by acknowledging them...
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    My town has a fairly recognisable population of homeless people. If I've seen (or in one case, experienced) them fighting, spitting, swearing, threatening or shouting at people, then I don't usually acknowledge them. If they're one of the more reasonable ones, I'll give them food if I have any on me or acknowledge them if not.
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    Problem is, how to determine who is homeless and who is not?

    The streets are littered with people who just try to get a little money for nothing, some of them are genuine, many are not. Some use someone else's baby to make it look like they are desperate, some use people's dogs to get the "aaaaaahhh" vote. Often they work in groups moving from pitch to pitch.

    Hard to know what to do, but for certain the rogues impact the ability of the genuine to get money from ordinary people.

    I would refrain from giving money generally. Food and drink or clothes are possibly better. Maybe buy a sleeping bag etc.

    Money will most likely be spent on bad things.
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    I feel a bit guilty about it but I do ignore them:dontknow:
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    I say "sorry got no change, mate" and then turn to my friends and shake my pocket full of quids.
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    (Original post by PilgrimOfTruth)
    Problem is, how to determine who is homeless and who is not?

    The streets are littered with people who just try to get a little money for nothing, some of them are genuine, many are not. Some use someone else's baby to make it look like they are desperate, some use people's dogs to get the "aaaaaahhh" vote. Often they work in groups moving from pitch to pitch.

    Hard to know what to do, but for certain the rogues impact the ability of the genuine to get money from ordinary people.

    I would refrain from giving money generally. Food and drink or clothes are possibly better. Maybe buy a sleeping bag etc.

    Money will most likely be spent on bad things.
    That's true- and it's pretty bad that non homeless people would take charity which could have otherwise gone to the genuinely homeless. I think it's better to give food/drink/sleeping bag and acknowledge than it is to give money. It would be great if you could somehow purchase vouchers for a shelter rather than giving them the money to do what they want with. If they're addicted to any kind of drug that is where the money will go- it's not like they're abusing your generosity- they're just addicts.
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    Of course!

    People only become homeless due to certain (unfortunate) circumstances. That doesn't change the fact they're as human as we are. It wouldn't feel right to not help them in some way
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    (Original post by callum_law)
    I say "sorry got no change, mate" and then turn to my friends and shake my pocket full of quids.
    Brutal!
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    I feel sorry for them. But I do not acknowledge them. Tbh 95% of people I walk past regardless of financial state I do not acknowledge.
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    I walk past, you can never tell when giving change to a homeless person that they'll use it for good or if they'll use for another can of beer. So I don't bother and save change for myself. I've donated to charities that deal with homeless people which is a more efficient way of making sure your change/donation goes to good use instead of it being wasted.
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    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    I feel sorry for them. But I do not acknowledge them. Tbh 95% of people I walk past regardless of financial state I do not acknowledge.
    But if they say to you- Hi do you have any change? or spare change or whatever? If they actually say something because you've walked past- do you say sorry no? Or do you just keep on walking and ignore that they've spoken?
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    The problem is a lot of beggers either have a council flat, so could make progress towards work but instead chose to be bums

    or they have underlying drug issues which means you could give them £50 a day for a year and they would still be homeless and hungry.

    and then you got the professional beggers, some of which pretend to be disabled etc then go back to their 3 bedrooms house in their car

    But there is some genuine people out there. The last convo I had with a begger, he said there are 80,000 people visiting for the rugby over the next week, if each of these people could just give me 1p i'd have 8 grand, that'd get me a nice place, food etc. I didn't wanna point out 80000 x 1p is only £800 but it did kinda show how he was angry that the world wasn't willing to help when there are so many resources available. But at the same time, fck him for sitting next to mcdonalds at 3am when he knows the clubs are kicking everyone out and people are more likely to give him stuff. Kinda makes me think he had some wit about him but was completely lazy.

    Despite all that i'm a sucker for giving them money if they ask me direct or buying 'em food if I see them about.
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    (Original post by EtherealNymph22)
    But if they say to you- Hi do you have any change? or spare change or whatever? If they actually say something because you've walked past- do you say sorry no? Or do you just keep on walking and ignore that they've spoken?
    I say sorry no if they ask for money, or I'll do my best to answer any query they have. I once saw a homeless man get upset when he asked a lady for the time and she said "I don't have any change" without making eye contact or even looking at him, and he was quite upset about it, so I try to at least listen to what they have to say.
 
 
 
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