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    Hi everyone, sorry if it seems like this question is asked a lot but im asking from the perspective of someone who is already studying Economics at University.
    I'm currently enrolled on a course in BA Economics and im considering a switch to Bsc Economics at the end of the year as they share first year modules.
    The only difference is that you have 4 modules across the second and third year in economics, as the Bsc requires you to complete the modules " Applied maths for economics ", "applied statistics ", " further statistics" and " applied Econometrics".
    Obviously these are all mathematical modules , and i previously considered myself fairly inexperienced with maths ( I didn't take maths at A level, but i was allowed to do Economics because i achieved a high A in maths at GCSE) so i took the Ba in economics to avoid maths, but once i started doing the maths involved ( ive just completed the intro to maths module for economics, and achieved a first in the coursework and will likely achieve a 2:1 or first in the exam i just finished ) i found it wasn't too bad, and after hearing that statistics is quite a bit easier than calculus and integration ( which i found fine in my intro to maths module) im considering switching to the Bsc at the end of the year.
    I know the difference is pretty negligible , and in most cases employers wont know the difference or care: but im definitely one of those obsessive people who would rather have the slight advantage that a Bsc offers than live with not having it, as pathetic as that sounds .
    From the sounds of the second and third year modules, and from any personal experience, do any of you guys think it would be feasible for me to take the Bsc if i found the maths so far tolerable, or am i getting a bit ahead of myself?
    Im studying at the University of Sussex if that makes a difference in the difficulty of modules and so forth.
    Furthermore, if i continue to take the Ba and choose finance electives i can say i have a Ba degree in Economics with finance, or i can switch to Bsc Economics and Finance next year also, ( although i found finance this term to be a bit boring so unless it gets more interesting this probably won't interest me, but if a Bsc in Economics and finance is considered better than a Ba or Bsc in Economics i might take it).
    Thanks for any suggestions
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    (Original post by Joshyreeve)
    Hi everyone, sorry if it seems like this question is asked a lot but im asking from the perspective of someone who is already studying Economics at University.
    I'm currently enrolled on a course in BA Economics and im considering a switch to Bsc Economics at the end of the year as they share first year modules.
    The only difference is that you have 4 modules across the second and third year in economics, as the Bsc requires you to complete the modules " Applied maths for economics ", "applied statistics ", " further statistics" and " applied Econometrics".
    Obviously these are all mathematical modules , and i previously considered myself fairly inexperienced with maths ( I didn't take maths at A level, but i was allowed to do Economics because i achieved a high A in maths at GCSE) so i took the Ba in economics to avoid maths, but once i started doing the maths involved ( ive just completed the intro to maths module for economics, and achieved a first in the coursework and will likely achieve a 2:1 or first in the exam i just finished ) i found it wasn't too bad, and after hearing that statistics is quite a bit easier than calculus and integration ( which i found fine in my intro to maths module) im considering switching to the Bsc at the end of the year.
    I know the difference is pretty negligible , and in most cases employers wont know the difference or care: but im definitely one of those obsessive people who would rather have the slight advantage that a Bsc offers than live with not having it, as pathetic as that sounds .
    From the sounds of the second and third year modules, and from any personal experience, do any of you guys think it would be feasible for me to take the Bsc if i found the maths so far tolerable, or am i getting a bit ahead of myself?
    Im studying at the University of Sussex if that makes a difference in the difficulty of modules and so forth.
    Furthermore, if i continue to take the Ba and choose finance electives i can say i have a Ba degree in Economics with finance, or i can switch to Bsc Economics and Finance next year also, ( although i found finance this term to be a bit boring so unless it gets more interesting this probably won't interest me, but if a Bsc in Economics and finance is considered better than a Ba or Bsc in Economics i might take it).
    Thanks for any suggestions
    I'm at Bristol doing Economics & Econometrics, the standard econometrics units tend to be quite manageable and applied, lots of writing with some reasonably difficult statistics and maths, but nothing you won't be able to get your head around if you've got a decent mathematical mind. The real killers are the econometric theory modules, and I would really avoid them unless you're very confident in your mathematical abilities, requires knowledge of linear algebra etc, but again, very hard work but manageable if you're mathematically minded! If you enjoy it though, its worth the hard work! But yeah, generally should be fine with switching to BSc! Hope this helps, sorry, written it in a rush haha!
 
 
 
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