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    Hi,

    I would appreciate it if someone could explain this point : 'ATP isn't a good long-term energy source due to the instability of its bonds'.

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    Energy is stored as sugars, so carbohydrates are used as a long term source. ATP is only synthesized when it's needed during respiration. And ATP can't be stored as long chains.
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    (Original post by zigocarn)
    Hi,

    I would appreciate it if someone could explain this point : 'ATP isn't a good long-term energy source due to the instability of its bonds'.

    Cheers
    When we store energy long-term, like we do with sugars, we want to keep it around for a while so we can use it when we need it.

    Energy is released from ATP due to a process that occurs when the bonds break. But it takes very little energy to break the bond between ADP and inorganic phosphate because ATP is fairly unstable. So ATP will break down quite quickly in the body, and it won't stick around for long enough to work as a long-term energy source.

    Carbohydrates are more stable, so we can store them and break them down (in respiration) when we need the energy.
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    Long term energy needs to be stored in Polysaccharides. This is why the cell does not have a lot of naked monosaccharide glucose molecules inside. Because like any molecule that is small, it has functional groups which are terminal to the molecule. Thats why they call all monosaccharides "reducing" sugars. Because they will reduce the environment around them. If its a long polysaccharide the reducing ends of the monosaccharide monomers are used up internally in glycosidic linkages. So in that form they don't reduce.

    For ATP, it will be the same thing, too much ATP in the cell as simple molecules would be an osmotic disaster for the cell. So this concept you are referring to applies to all monomers. The same is true for saccharides and amino acids, when molecules are stored as polymers, usually they only have reactive groups on their terminal ends.
 
 
 
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