Need a new religion, can anyone teach buddhism to me? Watch

xylas
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#1
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#1
I've tried the monotheistic religions but they are definitely not for me. I now consider myself an atheist however I never really considered the god-less religions such as buddhism

Are there any buddhists or ex-buddhists who would be willing to teach me?
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Croco
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#2
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/buddhism/
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xylas
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#3
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Have you tried buddhism?
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nucdev
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#4
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(Original post by xylas)
I've tried the monotheistic religions but they are definitely not for me. I now consider myself an atheist however I never really considered the god-less religions such as buddhism
There's also Jainism, or the atheistic branches of Hinduism
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xylas
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(Original post by nucdev)
There's also Jainism, or the atheistic branches of Hinduism
What's the main belief you have to follow in each case?
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nucdev
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(Original post by xylas)
What's the main belief you have to follow in each case?
Jainism is pretty much non-violence.

Atheistic Hinduism is too broad to give a concise explanation of a "main belief".
You can be a materialist or a humanist or even someone who just engages in rituals and sacrifices to appease the forces of nature.

But regardless, the Dharmic faiths (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism) are not "pushy" faiths like Abrahamic ones.
You're allowed to adopt parts that fit your lifestyle and reject others and still be considered good practitioners of those religions.
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xylas
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#7
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(Original post by nucdev)
Jainism is pretty much non-violence.

Atheistic Hinduism is too broad to give a concise explanation of a "main belief".
You can be a materialist or a humanist or even someone who just engages in rituals and sacrifices to appease the forces of nature.

But regardless, the Dharmic faiths (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism) are not "pushy" faiths like Abrahamic ones.
You're allowed to adopt parts that fit your lifestyle and reject others and still be considered good practitioners of those religions.
So basically there is no one belief or worldview in these religions?
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The Assassin
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#8
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Buddhism isn't godless; this is a common western misconception
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nucdev
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#9
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(Original post by xylas)
So basically there is no one belief or worldview in these religions?
I can't speak with too much authority for Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism because I'm Hindu, but Hinduism has a HUGE variety of different outlooks and philosophies, so you're allowed to pick the one that suits you without being branded as an apostate/heretic (all 4 Dharmic religions don't have those concepts anyway).
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xylas
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#10
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(Original post by nucdev)
I can't speak with too much authority for Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism because I'm Hindu, but Hinduism has a HUGE variety of different outlooks and philosophies, so you're allowed to pick the one that suits you without being branded as an apostate/heretic (all 4 Dharmic religions don't have those concepts anyway).
What's your worldview and why?
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nucdev
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#11
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(Original post by xylas)
What's your worldview and why?
Non-theistic monism, which probably makes no sense whatsoever :lol:

Basically it says that there is no such thing as a personal God (like in the Abrahamic religions), but something called Brahman which is essentially an abstract Cosmic Principle which manifests as this entire universe and everything within it.
The clearest vision of this Principle is humanity. Discovering that Principle/Divinity within yourself is the main aim of this branch and also happens to be free of binding doctrines and dogmas.

You can adopt a variety of different pathways to achieve this - it could be through charity work or Yoga or gaining knowledge through science, literature, poetry, maths; or even through simple things like listening to music or playing sport.

Discovering this inner Self is not limited to one or two pathways, but can manifest itself through any disciplined human endeavour. As many humans, that many ways of discovering the Principle/Brahman. As such, it's very pluralist in its outlook.
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