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    Hello everyone,

    Ive attempted both questions a and b but I wanted a second opinion as Im not sure if I have got the right answers:

    For question A my method was: 22000/25 = 880, and then 880/19=46.31= 47 ?

    For question B my reasoning was that if 5 Specialist advisors can have 39 front line advisors then 6 specialist advisors can have a maximum of 49, so answer 49 ?

    QUESTION A QUESTION B
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    This looks like a question you would see on an internship/job test, should you be posting this here?
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    (Original post by J_W-x)
    This looks like a question you would see on an internship/job test, should you be posting this here?
    Hey J_W-x,

    Yes, my tutor at college has given us a set of numerical practise questions to prepare for apprenticeship applications, and I just wanted to know if I have gone about answering the questions with the right method.
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    (Original post by BigL16)
    Hello everyone,

    Ive attempted both questions a and b but I wanted a second opinion as Im not sure if I have got the right answers:

    For question A my method was: 22000/25 = 880, and then 880/19=46.31= 47 ?

    For question B my reasoning was that if 5 Specialist advisors can have 39 front line advisors then 6 specialist advisors can have a maximum of 49, so answer 49 ?

    QUESTION A QUESTION B
    Name:  question A.jpeg
Views: 59
Size:  144.2 KB

    Attachment 496493496495
    Probably the easiest way to approach such questions is via the idea of "expended work". For example, the work of 1 advisor working for 1 day is 1 advisor x 1 day = 1 advisor-day, the work of 2 advisors working for 3 days is 2 advisor x 3 day = 6 advisor-day. Note that the units of "expended work" in this problem is advisor-day.

    So, we can now set up an equivalence between expended work, and no of calls. In month 1, 40 advisors working for 20 days handled 20000 calls so we can write:

    40 advisor x 20 day = 800 advisor-day \equiv 20000 call

    so that, on dividing both sides by 20000, we get:

    \frac{800 \text{ advisor-day }}{20000} = \frac{1}{25} advisor-day \equiv 1 call

    Now for month 7, you want to calculate the number of advisors needed over 19 days to handle the expected 22000 calls. So, first find the expended effort that you need:

    22000 \times \frac{1}{25} advisor-day \equiv 22000 call

    then find the number of advisors needed, which we'll call x, by noting that you have an expended effort of 19 x advisor-day available in that month. I'll let you finish off the details.
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    (Original post by atsruser)
    Probably the easiest way to approach such questions is via the idea of "expended work". For example, the work of 1 advisor working for 1 day is 1 advisor x 1 day = 1 advisor-day, the work of 2 advisors working for 3 days is 2 advisor x 3 day = 6 advisor-day. Note that the units of "expended work" in this problem is advisor-day.

    So, we can now set up an equivalence between expended work, and no of calls. In month 1, 40 advisors working for 20 days handled 20000 calls so we can write:

    40 advisor x 20 day = 800 advisor-day \equiv 20000 call

    so that, on dividing both sides by 20000, we get:

    \frac{800 \text{ advisor-day }}{20000} = \frac{1}{25} advisor-day \equiv 1 call

    Now for month 7, you want to calculate the number of advisors needed over 19 days to handle the expected 22000 calls. So, first find the expended effort that you need:

    22000 \times \frac{1}{25} advisor-day \equiv 22000 call

    then find the number of advisors needed, which we'll call x, by noting that you have an expended effort of 19 x advisor-day available in that month. I'll let you finish off the details.
    So therefore is the answer 46.31578947, which rounds to 47 advisors as you cannot have 0.31578947 of an advisor ?

    What about question b ?
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    For question A is 47 right ?

    For question B my reasoning is that if 5 Specialist advisors can have 39 front line advisors then 6 specialist advisors can have a maximum of 49, so answer 49 ?
 
 
 
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