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    So, religion has been quite the hot topic on TSR for the last few days and, since it was on my mind, I decided to write about it. I don't think I've included anything particularly offensive to any religion (while there is some slight criticism to Catholicism, I do acknowledge this is when it is placed in the wrong hands — I have nothing against the Catholic religion itself), but I've placed it in a spoiler, just in case some may want to avoid it. It's a bit of a long one, I won't lie!
    Spoiler:
    Show
    I was baptised as Catholic. While my mum does identify as religious (although she's Protestant — her and my dad brokered this odd deal that if I had his religion I could have her surname), she's religious in the sense that's how she was raised and she's never been fussed enough to question it. All members in our family are baptised, but I could count on two hands the amount of times I attended church (apart from Sunday school as a child, which was ran by my school's church). I wasn't raised in a particularly religious manner; I did my Holy Communion, but it was treated as more of a fancy party than a religious occasion (I, at seven, definitely didn't have much understanding of what the event was about — but hey, I got to wear a poofy dress and tiara!).

    From what I can remember, I went to mostly Catholic primary schools (I went to quite a few) and then, for secondary school, I went to a Catholic all girls' school. Until then, I'd never understood that Catholicism went deeper than merely trying to not eat meat on Good Friday (and even then, not always succeeding). Upon meeting my classmates, I was surprised to find out how many had been baptised solely to gain entrance to the school; much later, my aunt and uncle would debate what religion to christen my cousin and would decide on Catholicism as “all the best schools are Catholic.” I — and many others — were not sent to my school for any particular religious reason, but merely because it was a good school; all of the Catholic-related things that came with going to a religious school were considered something you merely put up with in order to receive a decent education.

    At first, it didn't bother me that much. Yes, masses were a yawnfest and there were some odd rules (we had to memorize the Hail Mary in French and when we said that prayer in assembly, it would have to be in French), but one of the school's religious traditions meant we got an afternoon off once a year — you know, you've got to look at the upsides! In fact, one thing I find interesting to this day is how one of the nuns who worked within the school was a Physics teacher; of course, we didn't understand how progressive that was at the time, instead finding it hilarious to pester her with questions about how that could be. :facepalm:

    I remember one turning point for me was an RE lesson we were having once. One of my friends was Muslim (one of the very few non-Catholics in the school) and, throughout the lesson, she was becoming increasingly irritated until, eventually, she shouted about how what the teacher was teaching wasn't correct and began to get quite upset. Until that point, I'd never considered the fact that our religious lessons weren't religious at all, but Catholic; on the odd occasion other religions would be brought into it, it would be brief. Until then, I'd never considered how hard it must have been for someone who wasn't Catholic — or just religiously apathetic, like most of us were — to listen to a school teach it as fact.

    At the time, I remember someone said that, as she was at a Catholic school, she should have to endure Catholic education, but it wasn't supposed to be Catholic education. We were supposed to be being given an unbiased, varied education on religion — if you don't provide students with that, how are they supposed to make informed choices on their views? Of course, it didn't occur to me until much later that this may have been the point.

    Another moment I remember was when, while I—at the time—was struggling with the development of mental health problems, one of my teachers told me those with mental illness were “posessed by demons.” Until that point, I'd never experienced Catholicism to be against me; it had always merely been a title that hadn't held much meaning. Despite all the Catholic education I received (because it was Catholic education), I'd never been taught how, sometimes, the religion could be hateful in the wrong hands; of course, again, it didn't occur to me until much later this may have been the point.

    I began to question it and, in a Catholic school, this came to my detriment. I questioned why, in a supposdely religious education lesson, all we learnt about was Catholicism. I questioned why RE was a mandatory GCSE subject. I questioned why mass was forced upon us, even on the few who were a religion other than Catholic. I questioned all of these things aloud. I was sent outside, I was told off, I was given our school's equivalent of a demerit, I was given detention.

    I questioned why I'd been baptised into a religion when I couldn't even talk in order to make an objection. Before, my only thoughts on Confirmation were that I'd get a free middle name. When the time for Confirmation arrived, I'd — at last — gotten the point I could make an informed choice as to whether I wanted to continue in the Catholic religion. I chose not to Confirm.

    I began to become bitter. There were a lot of things in life that I felt were unfair; I couldn't understand how, if God did exist, he could let those things happen. My best friend growing up was a good person, but he'd been inflicted with a degenerative disease that would eventually kill him; I couldn't understand why, if this were all in God's plan, he would do that. To be honest, in some ways, it was easier to not believe in a higher power because I couldn't handle the idea of there being a higher power that would let such things happen.

    I became — in the interests of full disclosure — one of those athiests that tries to force their opinions on anyone who dares not to agree with them. Don't worry, I'm ashamed of my past self enough for all of us.

    There was — following this — a brief time in which I turned back to religion. After my granddad died, one persistent memory was how, once, he told me he identified as an athiest, but that didn't stop him from being terrified of the fact he knew nothing would come after death. I was assured he wouldn't have known he was about to die, but that didn't stop me from being consumed with the thought of him dying terrified. The idea that — even if he did think that for a brief moment — he soon went on to the afterlife and was alieved of his fears reassured me.

    It got to the point I considered finally doing my Confirmation, but in the end, I realized, no matter how much I tried to convince myself of Catholicism, I couldn't — truly — commit myself a religion I didn't believe. For a while, I suceeded in telling myself as such, but it was a superficial kind of belief.

    I didn't return to how I'd been before, though. In that time, I'd grown an appreciation for religion. I wasn't bitter about those who were religious. In fact, I understood. I envied what they had. I admired them.

    I imagine it must be comforting to have faith that, no matter how bad things become, there is a power higher than yourself that is there for you. I imagine it must be comforting to be certain that there is something for you after death. I imagine it must be comforting to have no doubts that, when someone you love passes away, it won't be the last time you see them.

    I wish I could have that faith.

    As of now, I identify as agnostic. I've never found a religion I could wholeheartedly say I believe in, but at the same time, I can't say there's nothing. There are some things, I think, that can't be explained. Of course, I know there are many who would argue they can be explained and, perhaps, if I thought about it hard enough, I could find an explanation. Perhaps—in the end—I don't want to find an explanation. Perhaps—in the end—there's still a comfort in thinking there's at least not nothing, even if I can't be certain of what that not nothing means. And honestly? I'll take it.
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    (Original post by acupofgreentea)
    So, religion has been quite the hot topic on TSR for the last few days and, since it was on my mind, I decided to write about it. I don't think I've included anything particularly offensive to any religion (while there is some slight criticism to Catholicism, I do acknowledge this is when it is placed in the wrong hands — I have nothing against the Catholic religion itself), but I've placed it in a spoiler, just in case some may want to avoid it. It's a bit of a long one, I won't lie!
    Spoiler:
    Show
    I was baptised as Catholic. While my mum does identify as religious (although she's Protestant — her and my dad brokered this odd deal that if I had his religion I could have her surname), she's religious in the sense that's how she was raised and she's never been fussed enough to question it. All members in our family are baptised, but I could count on two hands the amount of times I attended church (apart from Sunday school as a child, which was ran by my school's church). I wasn't raised in a particularly religious manner; I did my Holy Communion, but it was treated as more of a fancy party than a religious occasion (I, at seven, definitely didn't have much understanding of what the event was about — but hey, I got to wear a poofy dress and tiara!).

    From what I can remember, I went to mostly Catholic primary schools (I went to quite a few) and then, for secondary school, I went to a Catholic all girls' school. Until then, I'd never understood that Catholicism went deeper than merely trying to not eat meat on Good Friday (and even then, not always succeeding). Upon meeting my classmates, I was surprised to find out how many had been baptised solely to gain entrance to the school; much later, my aunt and uncle would debate what religion to christen my cousin and would decide on Catholicism as “all the best schools are Catholic.” I — and many others — were not sent to my school for any particular religious reason, but merely because it was a good school; all of the Catholic-related things that came with going to a religious school were considered something you merely put up with in order to receive a decent education.

    At first, it didn't bother me that much. Yes, masses were a yawnfest and there were some odd rules (we had to memorize the Hail Mary in French and when we said that prayer in assembly, it would have to be in French), but one of the school's religious traditions meant we got an afternoon off once a year — you know, you've got to look at the upsides! In fact, one thing I find interesting to this day is how one of the nuns who worked within the school was a Physics teacher; of course, we didn't understand how progressive that was at the time, instead finding it hilarious to pester her with questions about how that could be. :facepalm:

    I remember one turning point for me was an RE lesson we were having once. One of my friends was Muslim (one of the very few non-Catholics in the school) and, throughout the lesson, she was becoming increasingly irritated until, eventually, she shouted about how what the teacher was teaching wasn't correct and began to get quite upset. Until that point, I'd never considered the fact that our religious lessons weren't religious at all, but Catholic; on the odd occasion other religions would be brought into it, it would be brief. Until then, I'd never considered how hard it must have been for someone who wasn't Catholic — or just religiously apathetic, like most of us were — to listen to a school teach it as fact.

    At the time, I remember someone said that, as she was at a Catholic school, she should have to endure Catholic education, but it wasn't supposed to be Catholic education. We were supposed to be being given an unbiased, varied education on religion — if you don't provide students with that, how are they supposed to make informed choices on their views? Of course, it didn't occur to me until much later that this may have been the point.

    Another moment I remember was when, while I—at the time—was struggling with the development of mental health problems, one of my teachers told me those with mental illness were “posessed by demons.” Until that point, I'd never experienced Catholicism to be against me; it had always merely been a title that hadn't held much meaning. Despite all the Catholic education I received (because it was Catholic education), I'd never been taught how, sometimes, the religion could be hateful in the wrong hands; of course, again, it didn't occur to me until much later this may have been the point.

    I began to question it and, in a Catholic school, this came to my detriment. I questioned why, in a supposdely religious education lesson, all we learnt about was Catholicism. I questioned why RE was a mandatory GCSE subject. I questioned why mass was forced upon us, even on the few who were a religion other than Catholic. I questioned all of these things aloud. I was sent outside, I was told off, I was given our school's equivalent of a demerit, I was given detention.

    I questioned why I'd been baptised into a religion when I couldn't even talk in order to make an objection. Before, my only thoughts on Confirmation were that I'd get a free middle name. When the time for Confirmation arrived, I'd — at last — gotten the point I could make an informed choice as to whether I wanted to continue in the Catholic religion. I chose not to Confirm.

    I began to become bitter. There were a lot of things in life that I felt were unfair; I couldn't understand how, if God did exist, he could let those things happen. My best friend growing up was a good person, but he'd been inflicted with a degenerative disease that would eventually kill him; I couldn't understand why, if this were all in God's plan, he would do that. To be honest, in some ways, it was easier to not believe in a higher power because I couldn't handle the idea of there being a higher power that would let such things happen.

    I became — in the interests of full disclosure — one of those athiests that tries to force their opinions on anyone who dares not to agree with them. Don't worry, I'm ashamed of my past self enough for all of us.

    There was — following this — a brief time in which I turned back to religion. After my granddad died, one persistent memory was how, once, he told me he identified as an athiest, but that didn't stop him from being terrified of the fact he knew nothing would come after death. I was assured he wouldn't have known he was about to die, but that didn't stop me from being consumed with the thought of him dying terrified. The idea that — even if he did think that for a brief moment — he soon went on to the afterlife and was alieved of his fears reassured me.

    It got to the point I considered finally doing my Confirmation, but in the end, I realized, no matter how much I tried to convince myself of Catholicism, I couldn't — truly — commit myself a religion I didn't believe. For a while, I suceeded in telling myself as such, but it was a superficial kind of belief.

    I didn't return to how I'd been before, though. In that time, I'd grown an appreciation for religion. I wasn't bitter about those who were religious. In fact, I understood. I envied what they had. I admired them.

    I imagine it must be comforting to have faith that, no matter how bad things become, there is a power higher than yourself that is there for you. I imagine it must be comforting to be certain that there is something for you after death. I imagine it must be comforting to have no doubts that, when someone you love passes away, it won't be the last time you see them.

    I wish I could have that faith.

    As of now, I identify as agnostic. I've never found a religion I could wholeheartedly say I believe in, but at the same time, I can't say there's nothing. There are some things, I think, that can't be explained. Of course, I know there are many who would argue they can be explained and, perhaps, if I thought about it hard enough, I could find an explanation. Perhaps—in the end—I don't want to find an explanation. Perhaps—in the end—there's still a comfort in thinking there's at least not nothing, even if I can't be certain of what that not nothing means. And honestly? I'll take it.
    Hi, yes this is a long story haha
    I agree with pretty much everything in that final paragraph

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    (Original post by Matrix123)
    Hi, yes this is a long story haha
    I agree with pretty much everything in that final paragraph

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I wasn't expecting anyone to read it, to be honest. :laugh: I was debating taking it down before you posted. Also, I was a tad wary about it being about religion as it can be quite a touchy subject.

    I'm gonna do something more cheerful next post, I think. :laugh: This blog is not very entertaining, I underestimated how hard this blogging jazz would be ... :erm:

    And I'm glad to see someone else who has a similar view on it! Are you going to make a blog? I'd definitely follow, if you did.
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    (Original post by acupofgreentea)
    I wasn't expecting anyone to read it, to be honest. :laugh: I was debating taking it down before you posted. Also, I was a tad wary about it being about religion as it can be quite a touchy subject.

    I'm gonna do something more cheerful next post, I think. :laugh: This blog is not very entertaining, I underestimated how hard this blogging jazz would be ... :erm:

    And I'm glad to see someone else who has a similar view on it! Are you going to make a blog? I'd definitely follow, if you did.
    No, it was really interesting learning all about that. Yeah it can be a really touchy subject but I think you handled it well.
    No! Well, maybe at some point in the future but I haven't really got any intentions of making a blog any time soon haha Thanks anyway

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    Stop telling me the thread is closed when I'm trying to quote people, TSR! It is evidently not closed - I'm looking at it right now.

    Sheesh, app problems.

    (There was a brief moment in which I panicked that my post had seriously offended someone and they'd deleted my entire blog, as well. :no:)
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    (Original post by acupofgreentea)
    Stop telling me the thread is closed when I'm trying to quote people, TSR! It is evidently not closed - I'm looking at it right now.

    Sheesh, app problems.

    (There was a brief moment in which I panicked that my post had seriously offended someone and they'd deleted my entire blog, as well. :no:)
    Haha I had a similar problem but with a different thread. Ah don't worry, I'm sure it won't come to that!

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    1. "I mean, what are you going to do with a Sociology degree? You can become a teacher or a researcher, that's it."

    2. "I mean, it's a lot easier to get on a Sociology degree, isn't it? It's not as difficult as other degrees."

    ... thanks.
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    (Original post by acupofgreentea)
    1. "I mean, what are you going to do with a Sociology degree? You can become a teacher or a researcher, that's it."

    2. "I mean, it's a lot easier to get on a Sociology degree, isn't it? It's not as difficult as other degrees."

    ... thanks.
    Don't listen to them. :console:
 
 
 
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