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    Hi, I understand that becoming a barrister is incredibly competitive, but do I stand a chance? I am incredibly passionate about the law and would very much like to dedicate my whole future to it. I've always, since young, aspired to become a barrister, but as i've grown older i've realised how unfair the world is, especially in the field of law. I come from a relatively 'average' family and I don't have the privilege of having any family member that are lawyers. Despite being in a disadvantage position, I am willing to sacrifice everything in order to strive to overcome this and try and succeed in becoming a barrister, no matter what it takes. In terms of my academia, I read law at Warwick University. My A-levels are A*A*AA, however my GCSE grade are really poor. I have 3A's, 4B's and 1C. Would my GCSE grades hinder me? How do I go about getting work experience? Moreover, what's the process for becoming a barrister?
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    Anyone?
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    (Original post by WarwickFan)
    Would my GCSE grades hinder me?
    Many sets of chambers (including many of the top commercial and chancery sets, if that turns out to be your cup of tea) do not even trouble themselves to ask for GCSE grades. Of those that do, I suspect they do not pay a great deal of attention to them.

    How do I go about getting work experience?
    Work experience for a barrister is called 'mini-pupillage'. Most sets of chambers will not take you until you have studied at least some law at university (typically, after your first year has been completed). You should identify which areas of law you are interested in, then look up sets (for example, in one of the legal directories, on the Chancery Bar website, via Google search, etc) and apply in the manner they state (typically via CV and cover letter, but occasionally via an application form).

    Mini-pupillages are more or less vital if you want to eventually become a barrister. When you apply for pupillage (a barrister's 'training year' if you like), you are invariably going to be asked about these. An application that didn't have at least three or four minis, and at least one in the same area as the set to which you are applying, would probably not have much chance of success.

    You also want to try and get involved in mooting or debating, and perhaps other legal extra-curricular activities (and indeed, extra-curricular activities generally can never hurt, so long as they don't distract you from getting good grades). Good academic grades are very important. Most sets ask for a minimum 2:1, but there are plenty of sets where that means that if you have a 2:1 you have a one-in-a-thousand chance of pupillage, and what they really want is a First.

    Moreover, what's the process for becoming a barrister?
    You need to complete a qualifying law degree, join an Inn of Court, pass the BPTC, obtain a pupillage, and then successfully apply for tenancy at the end of your pupillage. (Note that the order of some of those elements is not strict - you can join an Inn of Court before completing a law degree, and you can obtain a pupillage before any of those steps. Indeed, most people would advise you not to do the BPTC without a pupillage - or at least, a large scholarship towards the cost of the course).
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    You study law at Warwick but you don't know the process for becoming a barrister?
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    (Original post by Josh Lyman)
    You study law at Warwick but you don't know the process for becoming a barrister?
    I sound quite pathetic considering I do read law at Warwick and I know not the route, but i've just very recently studied law. I've focused my whole attention on the Solicitor route, but I feel I am better suited to become a barrister and therefore seek future information and guidance upon becoming a barrister.
 
 
 
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