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    York is basically ducks and 60's architecture. It's an "interesting" aesthetic.
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    King's College London is charmingly antiquated:



    But the brutalist Strand Building (below left) is a monstrosity:

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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    St. Anne's. I should probably add, just in case you decide to google it, that the concrete monstrosity you will see is not representative of most of the college :lol:
    I see XD
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Really? Were you teaching? Did you hear the explosion in Russel Square?

    Must have been pretty frightening to be close to the incidents. I was in London the previous day and on the Piccadilly.
    No I was at a conference. I was at King's Cross about 9:05 just after the tube was closed when the Russell Square bomb went off but before any emergency services arrived. I walked past Upper Woburn Place before the bus exploded at around 9:45. I didn't hear anything; the Cruciform's Building's walls are thick, but the conference eventually broke up from the forecourt of UCL's main building with UCL's alarms going off for a bomb scare.

    It was the first time since the 1970s that I had been in a bomb scare where I really thought something might go "bang".
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    Beautiful Newcastle University...





    Ah.
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    I just can't get my head around what could have appealed to people about brutalist architecture.:confused: Looking at these pictures, it's such a shame
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    (Original post by Quantex)
    The first picture of Durham is the castle, which is not the main building, it is used as student accommodation.

    Durham has been spending a lot on improving its buildings in last few years:



    Although their maths department has been neglected, as has the God-awful student union:

    I don't know why, but I really quite like the second one...
    It just has this charm to me, which makes it seem actually quite pretty...
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    It sounds like the rat-infested housing at UCL has been one of the high points of studying there. Now it seems some of their students are on a rent strike.
    http://www.theguardian.com/education...-demand-40-cut
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    It sounds like the rat-infested housing at UCL has been one of the high points of studying there. Now it seems some of their students are on a rent strike.
    http://www.theguardian.com/education...-demand-40-cut
    There is a trip adviser review for one of these halls from a Welsh lad up with a school party during the summer vac last year

    it was horridwhen we arrived people wehn into instant stress and panic. there wher people crying due to the unsafe look the place gave. My schhol mates where to scared to sleep in their own room therfore we had to move our matressess.
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    it was horridwhen we arrived people wehn into instant stress and panic. there wher people crying due to the unsafe look the place gave. My schhol mates where to scared to sleep in their own room therfore we had to move our matressess.
    :lol: Oh my, this is amazing.

    I've stayed in UCL halls before too.... I didn't think they were *that* bad....
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    :lol: Oh my, this is amazing.

    I've stayed in UCL halls before too.... I didn't think they were *that* bad....
    Which ones did you stay in?
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    Which ones did you stay in?
    Ramsey Hall? :holmes:
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    Ramsey Hall? :holmes:
    I used to live at Astor, just around the corner.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    No.

    Dodgy political deal meant another swimming pool got the extra metres.
    Leeds?

    I went as a small lad and it made a strong impression on me - despite having several swimming badges I was afraid to go in the deep end there. It was a lot larger than my local pool but the architecture made it seem unlikely the familiar laws of buoyancy could be reliable there.

    Wasn't paying attention and they pulled it down before I had a chance to revisit it as a grown up.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    Leeds?

    I went as a small lad and it made a strong impression on me - despite having several swimming badges I was afraid to go in the deep end there. It was a lot larger than my local pool but the architecture made it seem unlikely the familiar laws of buoyancy could be reliable there.

    Wasn't paying attention and they pulled it down before I had a chance to revisit it as a grown up.
    No. Nottingham
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    No. Nottingham
    Well I've learned something... is there a list of Paulson's wrong sized swimming pools somewhere online because I've not found it.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    Well I've learned something... is there a list of Paulson's wrong sized swimming pools somewhere online because I've not found it.
    No. There seems to be virtually nothing available about his architecture. A man with the largest architectural practice in Europe must have had some impact on the built environment but you wouldn't think so from the material out there.

    Architectural critics go on and on about Peter and Alison Smithson when they talk about brutalism but they built less in their careers than Poulson's office did every six months. The Smithsons may have been better architects but surely Poulson did more to define the age?

    There are plenty of books about Howard's Letchworth and Welwyn, Lutyen's New Dehli, Neimeyer's Brasilia, Le Corbusier's Chandigarh and even Prince Charles' Poundbury but has anyone written up Poulson's Aviemore, Britain's only true ski resort?
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    No. There seems to be virtually nothing available about his architecture. A man with the largest architectural practice in Europe must have had some impact on the built environment but you wouldn't think so from the material out there.

    Architectural critics go on and on about Peter and Alison Smithson when they talk about brutalism but they built less in their careers than Poulson's office did every six months. The Smithsons may have been better architects but surely Poulson did more to define the age?

    There are plenty of books about Howard's Letchworth and Welwyn, Lutyen's New Dehli, Neimeyer's Brasilia, Le Corbusier's Chandigarh and even Prince Charles' Poundbury but has anyone written up Poulson's Aviemore, Britain's only true ski resort?
    Is this the Poulson Aviemore?



    Looks really inviting! :lol:
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    :lol: Oh my, this is amazing.

    I've stayed in UCL halls before too.... I didn't think they were *that* bad....
    My sis did a postgrad at UCL and she heard loads of horror stories there about bizarre things happening in different halls and buildings. They have a lot of stuff that's basically in a terrible state - something to do with it being old and badly maintained I suppose.
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    (Original post by Gogregg)
    I don't know why, but I really quite like the second one...
    It just has this charm to me, which makes it seem actually quite pretty...
    That building, Dunelm, made a lot more sense when it was built, because the riverside was a mishmash of buildings with pitched roofs, so it actually kind of fitted in. Then those other buildings were ripped down and replaced with big dull flatter-roofed things, which I spent not enough time in doing my degree - I spent FAR more time in Dunelm working on the student newspaper and other things and it was a pretty good building inside, all oriented towards views of the river.
    Its main visual problem is that it's unfinished concrete, which might work in bright, dry climates like the Med, but just looks terrible after five years in the British maritime climate and light. When I was there parts of the inside were finally painted, and it was an instant improvement, despite the odd colours chosen. If they just painted the outside, so that what you saw were the edges not the rain stains and dirt of decades, it would be SO much better. I'd love to see someone with photoshop turn a lot of these concrete things plain white and see if they still look so grim.
 
 
 
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