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Can't solve this chem problem. Could you guys help me plz? watch

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    The problem is from the text book 'Chemistry for Cambridge IGCSE' and on page 11 question 3.

    Q: Oxygen is the gas we breathe in. It can be separated from the air. It boils at -219ºC and freezes at -183ºC.
    In which state is oxygen, at: 0ºC? -200ºC?



    But what I wonder is that can the boiling point be lower than the melting point ?
    In addition, the original boiling point of oxygen is -183ºC and the original melting point of oxygen is -219ºC.
    What's the matter with that question? or Am I stupid?
    Could anyone solve this please?
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    The question is from a text book 'Chemistry for Cambridge IGCSE' and on page 11 question 3.

    Q : Oxygen is the gas we breathe in. It can be separated from the air. It boils at -219ºC and freezes at -183ºC.
    In which state is oxygen, at: 0ºC? -200ºC?

    But what I wonder is that can the boiling point be lower than the melting point?
    In addition, according to the truths of science, the boiling point of oxygen is -183ºC , not -219ºC. And its melting point is -219ºC, not -183ºC.
    What's the matter with this question? or Am I stupid?

    Could anybody solve this please?
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    It's the other way around. Freezing point is -219 and boiling point is -183
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    0C - liquid
    -200C - somewhere between liquid and solid?
    The textbook has the boiling and freezing points wrong way round.

    PS - don't take my word for it coz I've never studied chemistry 😜😂😂😂
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    It's a typo, it freezes/melts at -218.4°C and boils/condenses at -183.0°C according to here

    You're right that the boiling point can't be lower than the melting point, you're not stupid at all!
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    (Original post by Nessie162)
    It's the other way around. Freezing point is -219 and boiling point is -183
    Then, the answer would be ' Oxygen is still gas at 0ºC.Oxygen turns into liquid at -200ºC.'
    Is this right ?
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    (Original post by Little Tail Chaser)
    It's a typo, it freezes/melts at -218.4°C and boils/condenses at -183.0°C according to here

    You're right that the boiling point can't be lower than the melting point, you're not stupid at all!
    Thank you sooooo much
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    (Original post by DougallnDougall)
    0C - liquid
    -200C - somewhere between liquid and solid?
    The textbook has the boiling and freezing points wrong way round.

    PS - don't take my word for it coz I've never studied chemistry 😜😂😂😂

    Thanx for your reply
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    (Original post by Diana Heo)
    Thanx for your reply
    You're welcome but honestly I wouldn't go with my answer unless quite desperate 🙈 Not sure how I even came to know that Oxygen can be boiled and frozen 😕😊
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    (Original post by Diana Heo)
    Then, the answer would be ' Oxygen is still gas at 0ºC.Oxygen turns into liquid at -200ºC.'
    Is this right ?
    You're correct about it being a gas and a liquid. It won't be 'in between' the two states as suggested above. Pure elements change state at or very close to their boiling/meting points.
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    There is some exceptions to the "in between states" comment, but definitely won't be taught in the GCSE syllabus.
 
 
 
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