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    I have my GCSEs coming up this summer and I am honestly scared for everything. I'm most scared for History though. I just can't remember the dates! Like, I know key events and stuff, but I just don't think I'm going to remember all of the dates and I think I'm going to fail. My only hope is my two controlled assessments, which I got A*s on. Will these bring up my grade if I totally fail my History exams? Any tips on remembering dates and stuff? Thanks x
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    I'm doing history this summer too. I find that using flash cards with the date on one side and fact on the other is really helpful. Also rereading notes and actively memorising is also useful.
    And your CAs only make up 25% so they don't have that much affect.


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    I know exactly how you feel about History, the sheer number of dates can be really daunting. I would say there are two things I did to learn the dates which might well be useful to you.

    The first one is to create a good set of consolidated notes for each section of your course. Try to make sure you’ve got enough to give reasonable examples but have attenuated enough to make the learning manageable. I’ve attached a couple of examples of what I did for my GCSE, I think in hindsight, it might have been a bit much.

    For me, the memory palace technique works rather well (yes, like in Sherlock). Basically, it involved going through each fact on the sheet and placing it, in my mind, in an area of my house or somewhere I know well (school buildings, friends and family houses etc). If it’s a difficult one to remember I will try to make it more vivid, and perhaps a tad humorous as well. In the exam, if I want an example for something, I can then quickly walk through my house like walking through a timeline and select an event. Also, I can jump straight to a particular event and get its date. Using this method it probably took me a few days of fairly hard revision to commit these to memory.

    Of course, everyone revises effectively in different ways. What I’ve suggested here worked well for me and might be worth a try… conversely, this might not be your style at all.
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    Hey guys, Ive got the controlled assessment coming up soon.

    Could you explain what you guys did in yours because my teacher hasn't really explained much about it other than having to write up a 2k words essay.

    Ive printed out plenty of articles related to the topic that where doing for our controlled asessment whcich is about china's history (in 1900's)

    And if possible could you give any tips for getting an A*
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    (Original post by shohaib712)
    Hey guys, Ive got the controlled assessment coming up soon.

    Could you explain what you guys did in yours because my teacher hasn't really explained much about it other than having to write up a 2k words essay.

    Ive printed out plenty of articles related to the topic that where doing for our controlled asessment whcich is about china's history (in 1900's)

    And if possible could you give any tips for getting an A*
    It was two years ago since I did my controlled assessment so I can’t remember a great deal about it and by now, things might have changed or you might be on a different board to this couple be a bit outdated.

    We were given a whole load of sources to analyse and although research on them was needed, I don’t think we had to gather any of our own. How it yours structured?

    From what I remember, there were a lot of loopholes to jump through in order to gain marks. I recall being told that in each paragraph (roughly one on each source), there must be certain things such as: basic analysis of the source, some deeper inferences, some analysis of the province, credibility, reliability and usefulness of the source and a short summary.

    It might be worth taking a look at the specification or the mark scheme for previous years and some exemplar controlled assessments to get an idea of the sort of thing that’s needed.

    Could ii be that your teacher just hasn’t got round to telling you in detail what you need to do and will give you more information in the coming weeks?

    I hope this helps, but do remember, don’t just take this at face value as mine was a couple of years ago.
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    What board are you doing? I do AQA and there is a lot less stress on dates and stuff than I would've though; the most important thing is you know the chronology of events so that when analysing sources you can use relevant CK in accordance to when the source was published and stuff like that. You can still get an A* even if you only know the dates of most of the key events; even if you forget one if you know the chronology you should be able to construct a reasonable guess to when it was.

    Anyway , if you're looking for something solid I agree with paddy and cannot stress enough how helpful memory palaces are.
    (Original post by paddy10663)
    I know exactly how you feel about History, the sheer number of dates can be really daunting. I would say there are two things I did to learn the dates which might well be useful to you.

    The first one is to create a good set of consolidated notes for each section of your course. Try to make sure you’ve got enough to give reasonable examples but have attenuated enough to make the learning manageable. I’ve attached a couple of examples of what I did for my GCSE, I think in hindsight, it might have been a bit much.

    For me, the memory palace technique works rather well (yes, like in Sherlock). Basically, it involved going through each fact on the sheet and placing it, in my mind, in an area of my house or somewhere I know well (school buildings, friends and family houses etc). If it’s a difficult one to remember I will try to make it more vivid, and perhaps a tad humorous as well. In the exam, if I want an example for something, I can then quickly walk through my house like walking through a timeline and select an event. Also, I can jump straight to a particular event and get its date. Using this method it probably took me a few days of fairly hard revision to commit these to memory.
    I'll be honest, my visual and spatial memory is pretty average (actually I often don't pay that much that much attention to my surroundings so it could be even worse) and I thought I was pretty crap at remembering dates and then I found memory palaces. Before using techniques I would struggle to remember dates and words, but memory palaces have improved my ability to perform these tasks by at least 250%, probably even more once I learn how to use them more effectively. To give an example, last lunchtime I revising for a german verb test in which I had to remember 11 irregular verbs, their translation and their forms in the 3rd person present, imperfect and perfect tenses. That's 44 pieces of information. It took me about 15-20 minutes to learn them and I can reliably recall it all. Now for me, struggling to recall just a few verbs and the fact that the spellings in different forms are so similar it's extremely difficult to remember the nuances and not get mixed up, this is an enormous help.

    Now I won't lie to you if you want to use it effectively it will take a lot of work and it is by no means easy; after remembering all of that I got pretty tired. However, if you do the research and put some time into it, not only will it help with history, but all subjects and even life beyond.

    I'm sure a lot of people are skeptical about how you can "instantly" double your memory capacity and it all sounds a bit pseudoscience, but I assure you there is evidence behind it. Without going into too much depth, there are 4 primary reasons why memory palaces (also called the method of loci) is so effective:
    1. Not all memory is created equal. When our ancestors had to hunt for their food they need to be able to remember long trails to get to sources of water, find prey, distringuish between what is and isn't dangerous and get back to their "homes". Thus, their visual and spatial memory developed and became far superior to others types, such as auditory. Memory palaces allow you to convert words, numbers etc. into images which are far more memorable.
    2. Attention. Memory palaces require a lot of focus and what's called "elaborative encoding" (basically what I explained in 1. as you convert the memories into different types you store more copies of it and this means it's a lot more likely you'll remember it as it strengthens neural pathways.
    3. Memorability and context. Something like the date 1910 has no context and is very bland. but if I can turn that into an image of a giant mop on stage singing the national anthem then I have created something a lot more surprising and weird, making it more memorable.
    4. Association and recall. By associating new things we're learning with things we already know it's a lot easier to find the new thing inside our brain. Ever know you know something, but just "can't find it"? This is called lethologica. In short, memory palaces give you a specific place to store the image so you will theoretically never lose it. This image is then attached to the information you wanted and therefore you will not experience lethologica as you'll always know where the information is.

    Hope you can give it a try, I assure you, it will help you tremendously.
 
 
 
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