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Taking GCSE Maths a year early Watch

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    (Original post by Mentally)
    I just called in sick that day on the exam,i was in year 9 so didnt really miss out on anything too important.
    It didnt really cause any problems tbh with the retake since i already got the A* on my first attempt
    It's still a resit ....

    I don't see how an underage candidate was allowed to sit an exam without his 'home' school being involved as your UPN would have to be involved in the entry. Schools would expect a call and letter from a parent to explain an absence ...
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    It's still a resit ....

    I don't see how an underage candidate was allowed to sit an exam without his 'home' school being involved as your UPN would have to be involved in the entry. Schools would expect a call and letter from a parent to explain an absence ...
    Again, the reason why universities frown upon resits is because they don't like someone taking 2 attempts to recieve their desired result. If I already recieved the top grade on my first attempt and then my school forced me to retake it again just for the sake of wanting to boost up their statistics (I go to a terrible school, at best only 5-8 students in the entire year would get an A, with maybe 1 or 2 A* on a good year) i doubt any university is going to complain too much.
    What do you mean by 'home schooled?'. All I did was privately enter myself at an exam centre. Also i think your overestimating the impact of a single day absence when your in year 9.
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    (Original post by Mentally)
    Again, the reason why universities frown upon resits is because they don't like someone taking 2 attempts to recieve their desired result. If I already recieved the top grade on my first attempt and then my school forced me to retake it again just for the sake of wanting to boost up their statistics (I go to a terrible school, at best only 5-8 students in the entire year would get an A, with maybe 1 or 2 A* on a good year) i doubt any university is going to complain too much.
    What do you mean by 'home schooled?'. All I did was privately enter myself at an exam centre. Also i think your overestimating the impact of a single day absence when your in year 9.
    It will be regarded as a resit whatever the grades .... some unis won't like it.

    I did not say 'home schooled' - I said your school would need to supply your UPN for an exam entry which you cannot make yourself when you are under 16 - your parents would need to give permission for you to do it.
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    I took GCSE Maths a year early in year 10, then I did statistics in Year 11 (but there wasnt any hard maths in there just data). My school didn't offer further Maths, so I decided quite late to do the level 3 Algebra award, which is just the A* topics of GCSE, and that helped a bit with retaining the Maths information. But I would advise you to take it early, it did me good as I could concentrate on the other subjects I was doing. And an A/A* grade will still hold the same value as the levels because they understand it is a relatively new change and some people will have taken the previous specifications and others the newer ones. So go for it, and try for an A*, and in Year 11 do the Level 3 Algebra Award (which is worth 7 UCAS points btw) to retain your maths knowledge.
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    (Original post by Salman_)
    Hi all, so I am in year 10 right now but am thinking of doing GCSE Maths a year early, this coming June, as the new spec is really hard and i am confident i could do the old spec and get an A. The deadline for entering students for exams is 21/02 this year, so would my school be allowed to enter me even though it is a different spec?
    If you attend a state school, they are highly unlikely to allow this because the old specification does not count towards performance tables at the end of Year 11. It will also not be recognised for the Post 16 funding requirement so you would have to resit the reformed GCSE in Year 12.
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    (Original post by HedgehogsRulz)
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    Don't you get offered a GCSE additional maths/GCSE further maths qualification

    I done maths in my first gcse year and additional maths in my second

    What is FSMQ btw, i see it talked about quite a bit?

    (northern irish student student here btw)
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    (Original post by DylanJ42)
    Don't you get offered a GCSE additional maths/GCSE further maths qualification

    I done maths in my first gcse year and additional maths in my second

    What is FSMQ btw, i see it talked about quite a bit?

    (northern irish student student here btw)
    FSMQ are free standing mathematics qualifications.
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    FSMQ are free standing mathematics qualifications.
    why is this done instead of doing another maths gcse? does gcse further maths not exist in england? or is it just not valued over there?
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    If you attend a state school, they are highly unlikely to allow this because the old specification does not count towards performance tables at the end of Year 11. It will also not be recognised for the Post 16 funding requirement so you would have to resit the reformed GCSE in Year 12.
    Suppose a parent is willing to pay for their child to sit the GCSE this year as an external candidate and then the 2017 GCSE at their school. Do you see any disadvantage for the student in doing this?

    A parent I know wants to do this just to see how their child will do and the school has given their permission. The parent doesn't mind if the new GCSE grade will replace the year 10 grade in university applications etc.

    School staff I've asked don't seem to be confident in answering this question.
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    (Original post by notnek)
    Suppose a parent is willing to pay for their child to sit the GCSE this year as an external candidate and then the 2017 GCSE at their school. Do you see any disadvantage for the student in doing this?

    A parent I know wants to do this just to see how their child will do and the school has given their permission. The parent doesn't mind if the new GCSE grade will replace the year 10 grade in university applications etc.

    School staff I've asked don't seem to be confident in answering this question.
    I think it would be a massive waste of time. That GCSE won't be recognised for this cohort as it is less rigorous/challenging that the reformed qualification.
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    (Original post by DylanJ42)
    Don't you get offered a GCSE additional maths/GCSE further maths qualification

    I done maths in my first gcse year and additional maths in my second

    What is FSMQ btw, i see it talked about quite a bit?

    (northern irish student student here btw)
    FSMQ is a separate qualification that is harder than GCSE and uses some of the syllabus of the A level maths. It has a lot of stuff that can help you prepare for A level, but the thing is that it uses bits and bobs of some the maths modules (such as S1, M1 and a little C1 & C2) so you don't really get a huge head start, rather it just gives you something to do to fill up the maths lessons you would otherwise have if you didn't do the exam early.

    I'm not sure if you do the same a level maths in northern ireland so I hope this was a useful explanation.
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    (Original post by DylanJ42)
    why is this done instead of doing another maths gcse? does gcse further maths not exist in england? or is it just not valued over there?
    I actually haven't heard of further maths GCSE at all, so I guess it doesn't exist over here, though I could be wrong. When I did FSMQ last year, they only printed a textbook half way through the year... just shows the amount of resources that went into it!
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    (Original post by HedgehogsRulz)
    FSMQ is a seperate qualification that is harder than GCSE and uses some of the syllabus of the A level maths. It has a lot of stuff that can help you prepare for A level, but the thing is that it uses bits and bobs of some the maths modules (such as S1, M1 and a little C1 & C2) so you don't really get a huge head start, rather it just gives you something to do to fill up the maths lessons you would otherwise have if you didn't do the exam early.

    I'm not sure if you do the same a level maths in northern ireland so I hope this was a useful explanation.
    yes that makes sense, its weird how that exists though, surely they should either do another full gcse or start into AS maths early. This half assed qualification seems like a waste to me :dontknow:

    yea I do edexcel maths (the same one as a lot of people on this site)
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    (Original post by DylanJ42)
    yes that makes sense, its weird how that exists though, surely they should either do another full gcse or start into AS maths early. This half assed qualification seems like a waste to me :dontknow:

    yea I do edexcel maths (the same one as a lot of people on this site)
    Edexcel maths&further over here also, and I totally agree. I am sure people would have put a lot more effort into it if they knew it counted towards something, but otherwise it seemed like a waste of time.
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    (Original post by notnek)
    Suppose a parent is willing to pay for their child to sit the GCSE this year as an external candidate and then the 2017 GCSE at their school. Do you see any disadvantage for the student in doing this?

    A parent I know wants to do this just to see how their child will do and the school has given their permission. The parent doesn't mind if the new GCSE grade will replace the year 10 grade in university applications etc.

    School staff I've asked don't seem to be confident in answering this question.
    Someone at the school needs to read the 2017 performance tables rules very carefully with this in mind. At the moment, if you take it early in the UK* (even if you take it away from your home school as a private candidate) then it counts on your school stats at the first attempt. They've changed it for next year but I'd have to read the rules with this in mind to know exactly what the implications are.

    * Oddly you could take exactly the same spec abroad and it wouldn't count - had a student take 1MA0 in Abu Dhabi in Year 10 and then join us in Year 11 and the DfE took it that he hadn't done it.
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    (Original post by HedgehogsRulz)
    Edexcel maths&further over here also, and I totally agree. I am sure people would have put a lot more effort into it if they knew it counted towards something, but otherwise it seemed like a waste of time.
    Can you put it on your UCAS and is it a respected qualification? Even doing Core 1 a year early and not doing the exam seems like better preparation for AS maths than FSMQ :rofl:
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    (Original post by notnek)
    Suppose a parent is willing to pay for their child to sit the GCSE this year as an external candidate and then the 2017 GCSE at their school. Do you see any disadvantage for the student in doing this?

    A parent I know wants to do this just to see how their child will do and the school has given their permission. The parent doesn't mind if the new GCSE grade will replace the year 10 grade in university applications etc.

    School staff I've asked don't seem to be confident in answering this question.
    There's no way we would give permission - the student will have a 'resit' on their record for uni application. They have to declare BOTH grades on UCAS and the performance table rules say they have to take the new 9 to 1 GCSE.

    It is a complete waste of time and money.
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    (Original post by DylanJ42)
    Can you put it on your UCAS and is it a respected qualification? Even doing Core 1 a year early and not doing the exam seems like better preparation for AS maths than FSMQ :rofl:
    FSMQ actually gets you UCAS points, but as to doing C1 a year early.. I am pretty certain that you can't do just one module early, and core 1 is piss anyway so if one was considering doing something early, you might aswell just pick one of the easy modules like D1 or S1 alongside C1+C2, get 90+ UMS on C1 & your module of choice, hope for the best with C2 and you might just get yourself a nice little AS.
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    There's no way we would give permission - the student will have a 'resit' on their record for uni application. They have to declare BOTH grades on UCAS and the performance table rules say they have to take the new 9 to 1 GCSE.

    It is a complete waste of time and money.
    Yes I did think this and I was surprised that their school has allowed it.

    I only teach A Level currently so couldn't give the best advice but it seems like I should have advised against it.
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    (Original post by HedgehogsRulz)
    FSMQ actually gets you UCAS points, but as to doing C1 a year early.. I am pretty certain that you can't do just one module early, and core 1 is piss anyway so if one was considering doing something early, you might aswell just pick one of the easy modules like D1 or S1 alongside C1+C2, get 90+ UMS on C1 & your module of choice, hope for the best with C2 and you might just get yourself a nice little AS.
    of course, if you done the C1 exam early then you would be doing the alevel over 3 years which isn't allowed

    What I meant was that you may as well have an unofficial class where you learn Core 1 (and as you say Core 2) early but not actually do the exams at the end of the year, as this would almost certainly ensure 95UMS+ for the AS when you re-do it in the official class next year
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    Obviously this would never happen, I just mean that doing the above seems more worthwhile than FSMQ
 
 
 
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