Redsauce
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Hello Namaste Hola 嘿💕


I'm in Year11 still deciding upon which field of the medical stream to choose, and been quite much thinking about being a cosmetic surgeon. If anyone is familiar with this field, as in how many years of study is required to graduate as a qualified cosmetic surgeon💕? And is the field of cosmetic surgery is popular nowadays, as a work field?

Thank you Gracias
ありがとう 💕
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Beska
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(Original post by Redsauce)
Hello Namaste Hola 嘿💕


I'm in Year11 still deciding upon which field of the medical stream to choose, and been quite much thinking about being a cosmetic surgeon. If anyone is familiar with this field, as in how many years of study is required to graduate as a qualified cosmetic surgeon💕? And is the field of cosmetic surgery is popular nowadays, as a work field?

Thank you Gracias
ありがとう 💕
Plastic surgery is a (competitive) surgical specialty, and cosmetic surgery a branch of that and relatively minor - 80% is reconstructive. The career path is relatively well set out and requires 5-6 years at medical school, 2 years foundation training, 2 years core surgical training and then an application to the mind-blowingly competitive plastic surgery specialist training (145 applications for 9 training spots). There is then 6 years of plastic surgery training before you read the end of the training and become eligible to become a consultant (you get a 'CCT'), but there's not any deficit of consultants so it might take you a few years post-CCT. After CCT there's additional sub-specialist training you need to do, in particular to do aesthetic surgery. This excludes time for research, and given the competitiveness of the specialty the need for a doctorate (e.g. PhD) is increasing, and that's an additional 3 years.

Lots of people are going to say this but it's ok to have an idea of what you want to do, but something as focused as a sub-specialism of a very competitive surgical specialty might leave you a bit too tunnel visioned. Be a bit more open minded... first step is medical school.
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Hype en Ecosse
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(Original post by Beska)
Plastic surgery is a (competitive) surgical specialty, and cosmetic surgery a branch of that and relatively minor - 80% is reconstructive. The career path is relatively well set out and requires 5-6 years at medical school, 2 years foundation training, 2 years core surgical training and then an application to the mind-blowingly competitive plastic surgery specialist training (145 applications for 9 training spots). There is then 6 years of plastic surgery training before you read the end of the training and become eligible to become a consultant (you get a 'CCT', but there's not any deficit of consultants so it might take you a few years post-CCT. After CCT there's additional sub-specialist training you need to do, in particular to do aesthetic surgery. This excludes time for research, and given the competitiveness of the specialty the need for a doctorate (e.g. PhD) is increasing, and that's an additional 3 years.

Lots of people are going to say this but it's ok to have an idea of what you want to do, but something as focused as a sub-specialism of a very competitive surgical specialty might leave you a bit too tunnel visioned. Be a bit more open minded... first step is medical school.
For those that CCT that don't get a consultant job, what non-training post do they usually work at? Staff grade, or what?

Props to OP, though, it's the first time I've ever heard a medical applicant say they want to be a cosmetic surgeon (and, quite frankly, know the difference between a plastic surgeon and a cosmetic surgeon )
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Beska
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(Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
For those that CCT that don't get a consultant job, what non-training post do they usually work at? Staff grade, or what?

Props to OP, though, it's the first time I've ever heard a medical applicant say they want to be a cosmetic surgeon (and, quite frankly, know the difference between a plastic surgeon and a cosmetic surgeon )
Usually fellowship positions, gaining experience and contacts (mainly contacts) for a consultant job. I know other specialties (mainly medical) have sub-specialisation before CCT, not sure if it's unique to plastics or surgical specialties but you need to do at least an aesthetics fellowship post-CCT to gain experience in that area before you'd do any of that kind of work (which the OP mentioned). It's a competitive specialty anyway, and cosmetics is even more competitive. In fields like that it really is all about experience, so if you reach the post-CCT bottleneck and a position comes up, the one with the most experience and/or letters after their name and/or contacts will get it. Similar shabang to neurosurgery I imagine, but I know less about neurosurgery than plastics.
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MonteCristo
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(Original post by Redsauce)
I'm in Year11 still deciding upon which field of the medical stream to choose, and been quite much thinking about being a cosmetic surgeon. If anyone is familiar with this field, as in how many years of study is required to graduate as a qualified cosmetic surgeon
As far as I understand there is not really a specialty called "cosmetic surgery". This causes a lot of upset amongst plastic surgeons as they perceive a whole raft of GPs and other doctors calling themselves "cosmetic surgeons": www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-30932585

Most legitimate cosmetic surgeons are plastic surgeons whose principal employment is in the NHS doing a plastics sub-specialty (breast surgery/reconstruction, hand surgery, genitourinary malformations, trauma) and then earn some pocket money at weekends by providing cosmetic procedures privately. A small number of plastic surgeons may have a very successful private practice and eventually leave the NHS. There is (almost by definition) no "cosmetic" surgery in the NHS. Some procedures might overlap (e.g. breast reduction) but, in the NHS, these are almost always done for non-cosmetic reasons. So... if you were to be a cosmetic surgeon, you would probably do:

-Medical school (5-6 years)
-Foundation programme (2 years)
-Core surgical training (2 years)
-Higher surgical training in plastic surgery (5 years)
-Fellowship training in plastic surgery (1-2 years)
-Work as an NHS plastics consultant while slowly building a private practice (5-10 years)
-Potentially move full-time into a private cosmetic practice

This timeline assumes that you don't take additional time out of training for more experience, a research degree (MD/PhD), maternity leave, etc. It might seem like a long time but you would be earning, helping patients, and having lots of fun (!) throughout your training after finishing medical school.
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Redsauce
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(Original post by MonteCristo)
As far as I understand there is not really a specialty called "cosmetic surgery". This causes a lot of upset amongst plastic surgeons as they perceive a whole raft of GPs and other doctors calling themselves "cosmetic surgeons": www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-30932585

Most legitimate cosmetic surgeons are plastic surgeons whose principal employment is in the NHS doing a plastics sub-specialty (breast surgery/reconstruction, hand surgery, genitourinary malformations, trauma) and then earn some pocket money at weekends by providing cosmetic procedures privately. A small number of plastic surgeons may have a very successful private practice and eventually leave the NHS. There is (almost by definition) no "cosmetic" surgery in the NHS. Some procedures might overlap (e.g. breast reduction) but, in the NHS, these are almost always done for non-cosmetic reasons. So... if you were to be a cosmetic surgeon, you would probably do:

-Medical school (5-6 years)
-Foundation programme (2 years)
-Core surgical training (2 years)
-Higher surgical training in plastic surgery (5 years)
-Fellowship training in plastic surgery (1-2 years)
-Work as an NHS plastics consultant while slowly building a private practice (5-10 years)
-Potentially move full-time into a private cosmetic practice

This timeline assumes that you don't take additional time out of training for more experience, a research degree (MD/PhD), maternity leave, etc. It might seem like a long time but you would be earning, helping patients, and having lots of fun (!) throughout your training after finishing medical school.
Now I see! Thank you so much.

Regardless of the long way time this seems to be as you said, it sounds pretty cool to be in training after medical school whilst earning and working at the same time!

So after all that & depending on your knowledge/ experience, do you recommend me to do that as a career?
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MonteCristo
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(Original post by Redsauce)
So after all that & depending on your knowledge/ experience, do you recommend me to do that as a career?
If you enjoy learning new things and working hard then I would recommend being a doctor. If you discover as a student/doctor that you enjoy surgery (many students find surgery "boring"), then you can drive your career in the direction of plastic surgery. You could then work out for yourself whether you'd prefer to do cosmetic work as a "hobby" for extra income in your spare time or try to set up a full time private practice.

I personally would make sure you are happy with a career as a doctor and, only after that, as a cosmetic surgeon. You will probably spend 20 years working as a doctor (of various types) before you really end up with a large cosmetic practice.

Cosmetic surgery wouldn't suit me as a career (I prefer the high-octane adrenaline rush of the emergency department...) but thankfully we all end up wanting to do very different things. Perhaps you will still want to be a cosmetic surgeon in 10 years, perhaps not. If not, medicine will provide lots of other opportunities to keep you entertained as your career develops.
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