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    Which university did you go to?
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    (Original post by jon2016)
    What are CA and ST exams ? And how many in total do you do before you become qualified
    There are 15 exams in total to qualify as a Fellow (the most desired route) which essentially means your qualified in a specialist area (e.g. Pensions, Insurance, Finance etc..)

    The CA series are "Core Application" exams, made up for 3 exams :

    CA1 (Actuarial Risk Management) - probably the toughest exam in the whole qualification. It's all your technical stuff applied to a more wider level (management business processes and risks faced by financial intuitions and a lot more.)

    CA2 (Models) - Basically an excel test where your given a scenario, have to build a model and document it.

    CA3 (Communications) - 2 day exam which has a written element consisting of conveying an actuarial topic to a non actuarial audience. You make slides then record yourself which the 2nd part of the exam.

    The ST's are specialist technical exams, which go further into technical concepts in relation to your area of practice. You need to pass two of these to qualify as a fellow as well as one SA (Specialist Application).

    You can still call yourself an actuary if you qualify as an Associate (all CT's and CA's no ST's and SA's).
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    (Original post by bijesh12)
    There are 15 exams in total to qualify as a Fellow (the most desired route) which essentially means your qualified in a specialist area (e.g. Pensions, Insurance, Finance etc..)

    The CA series are "Core Application" exams, made up for 3 exams :

    CA1 (Actuarial Risk Management) - probably the toughest exam in the whole qualification. It's all your technical stuff applied to a more wider level (management business processes and risks faced by financial intuitions and a lot more.)

    CA2 (Models) - Basically an excel test where your given a scenario, have to build a model and document it.

    CA3 (Communications) - 2 day exam which has a written element consisting of conveying an actuarial topic to a non actuarial audience. You make slides then record yourself which the 2nd part of the exam.

    The ST's are specialist technical exams, which go further into technical concepts in relation to your area of practice. You need to pass two of these to qualify as a fellow as well as one SA (Specialist Application).

    You can still call yourself an actuary if you qualify as an Associate (all CT's and CA's no ST's and SA's).

    Ah right thanks ! So you must have pass all CAs and 2 STs to be a qualified actuary

    So if a big4 firm is offering a starting salary of £29,000

    What do you think the salary progression will be for someone who took 4 years to qualify ?

    starting - 29
    yr1 - 35
    yr2 - 40
    yr3 - 45
    yr4 - 55

    sound reasonable ?
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    (Original post by jon2016)
    starting - 29
    yr1 - 35
    yr2 - 40
    yr3 - 45
    yr4 - 55

    sound reasonable ?
    Salaries differ quite widely between specialisms. A newly qualified london market general insurance actuary can push for a 90k starting salary (with ~35% bonus on top). Pensions qualifying will be much closer to the 50k mark.

    If you're good then you will be rewarded well. Note that once you qualify unless you add value in some other way you shouldn't expect that much in terms of further raises. Qualified actuary total comp will broadly be 130k to 150k in london market GI. Depending on the size of the company and the stature of the role chief actuaries can fetch up to (and exceeding) 1m.
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    (Original post by bijesh12)
    There are 15 exams in total to qualify as a Fellow (the most desired route) which essentially means your qualified in a specialist area (e.g. Pensions, Insurance, Finance etc..)

    The CA series are "Core Application" exams, made up for 3 exams :

    CA1 (Actuarial Risk Management) - probably the toughest exam in the whole qualification. It's all your technical stuff applied to a more wider level (management business processes and risks faced by financial intuitions and a lot more.)

    CA2 (Models) - Basically an excel test where your given a scenario, have to build a model and document it.

    CA3 (Communications) - 2 day exam which has a written element consisting of conveying an actuarial topic to a non actuarial audience. You make slides then record yourself which the 2nd part of the exam.

    The ST's are specialist technical exams, which go further into technical concepts in relation to your area of practice. You need to pass two of these to qualify as a fellow as well as one SA (Specialist Application).

    You can still call yourself an actuary if you qualify as an Associate (all CT's and CA's no ST's and SA's).
    What's your opinion on doing an MSc that exempts you from CT1-CT8 exams (providing successful completion of the course)? Also if one took that route would it be necessary to still go through an actuarial trainee scheme?
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    (Original post by TheIrrational)
    .
    Would like to hear your opinion too on the question above
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    Are actuarial jobs really as well paid as they are made out to be, so there salaries rival that of a doctor?


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    (Original post by Cluster1)
    Are actuarial jobs really as well paid as they are made out to be, so there salaries rival that of a doctor?


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    If you're a good actuary you will get paid very well. The hard part is making it there and getting into a company willing to support you on your journey!
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    does a maths degree give exemptions for the exams?
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    (Original post by drogon)
    does a maths degree give exemptions for the exams?
    From my current understanding it doesn't but it can exempt you from them if your uni has modules that are in line with some of the content in the CT exams.

    Are you currently doing a maths degree?
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    (Original post by a10)
    From my current understanding it doesn't but it can exempt you from them if your uni has modules that are in line with some of the content in the CT exams.

    Are you currently doing a maths degree?
    oh okk

    lol no im still in yr 11 xDD
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    (Original post by drogon)
    oh okk

    lol no im still in yr 11 xDD
    Ahhh

    I wish I was this focused then....rather than now
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    (Original post by a10)
    Ahhh

    I wish I was this focused then....rather than now
    Why? Are you planning on becoming an actuary?
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    (Original post by drogon)
    Why? Are you planning on becoming an actuary?
    Yeah, thinking of changing career and becoming one as its one of the careers I looked at before I chose engineering (Idk I feel like part of me regrets studying engineering lol).
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    (Original post by jon2016)
    Ah right thanks ! So you must have pass all CAs and 2 STs to be a qualified actuary

    So if a big4 firm is offering a starting salary of £29,000

    What do you think the salary progression will be for someone who took 4 years to qualify ?

    starting - 29
    yr1 - 35
    yr2 - 40
    yr3 - 45
    yr4 - 55

    sound reasonable ?
    yes i guess you'd expect to be in the £50 - £60 k bracket when you qualify, also depends on bonuses based on annual performance reviews (atleast for me).
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    (Original post by a10)
    What's your opinion on doing an MSc that exempts you from CT1-CT8 exams (providing successful completion of the course)? Also if one took that route would it be necessary to still go through an actuarial trainee scheme?
    Many of the people who i know that work with me infact all but two people i know haven't done actuarial science (Mostly maths grads, some physics and economics), so i don't know much about that route. I guess purely from an exams perspective it's great, but you'd still have the same training and everything else as a new grad would with no exemptions (given this is your first actuarial job in that particular sector).

    Judging by the vast majority of the peoples' background who work with me, I don't think it's any better if you have all those exemptions.
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    (Original post by bijesh12)
    Many of the people who i know that work with me infact all but two people i know haven't done actuarial science (Mostly maths grads, some physics and economics), so i don't know much about that route. I guess purely from an exams perspective it's great, but you'd still have the same training and everything else as a new grad would with no exemptions (given this is your first actuarial job in that particular sector).

    Judging by the vast majority of the peoples' background who work with me, I don't think it's any better if you have all those exemptions.
    Thanks for the response.

    Does it matter if I have a BEng or MEng for the scheme?
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    (Original post by a10)
    Thanks for the response.

    Does it matter if I have a BEng or MEng for the scheme?
    Don't think it matters much to be honest.
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    (Original post by bijesh12)
    Don't think it matters much to be honest.
    Did you have prior experience (in an acturial environment, finance or you had no experience at all?) before you got onto the training scheme?

    I'm looking at a few schemes and so far the ones i have seen want you to be part qualified?
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    (Original post by a10)
    Did you have prior experience (in an acturial environment, finance or you had no experience at all?) before you got onto the training scheme?

    I'm looking at a few schemes and so far the ones i have seen want you to be part qualified?
    I don't think those are grad schemes.. More like part-qualified jobs that need to be replenished after people decide to leave a respective firm.

    Most grad schemes assume 0 relevant experience - sans any internships or industrial placements.

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