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Do people believe in god because they are scared of death? Watch

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    (Original post by TSRguy100)
    Sure thing a-hole, keep justifying your abusive personality.
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    Not at all, maybe some do as it's possible but I'm not.
    I would be considered as religious and I've read some of the comments with slight shock since many here seem to misunderstand religious people. Of course we are all individuals with different reasons for believing but me and my Christians friends definitely don't believe because we somehow fear death. It's more complex than that and some of us were once agnostics/atheists but converted while others grew up in a Christian house hold.
    And it's actually the other way round for me, I'd rather die having nothing happen than die knowing a hell existed. Even if I didn't end up there, it would be saddening knowing such a place existed. When I was agnostic I didn't fear death but now being a Christian, death seems a tad scarier though we believe in salvation. I feel like you guys who are not religious will never understand until you research about our religions and be in it for at least a day. Don't just assume.
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    People believe in the obvious truth and believe in facts and believe in things which exist because pretending not to believe in something that everyone believes and knows to be true just isn't cool. It's not edgy in the slightest.
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    (Original post by Gul89)
    people who believe are religious and believe in god AREN'T scared of death, why would you if you are doing good, surely when death awaits you'll have nothing to hide and you'll go to paradise.
    PinkMobilePhone :lol:

    I've never really been scared of death since being a child, which is before I came to have religious faith.
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    Religion, great example of people who live by desire rather than reality.
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    (Original post by random_matt)
    Religion, great example of people who live by desire rather than reality.
    But isn't that quite judgemental to say?
    Some on here are trying to say a couple of the reasons for us believing is invalid but who gave you guys this authority to say what is and isn't valid? I don't like this at all. I'm not even going to argue with any one today, I'm really trying not to. I guess you're all entitled to your own opinions. I just hate this attitude that's being portrayed in this thread of 'we know your reasons' when our reasons are not at the same though we are religious.
    Ah this is the kind of thing that makes me cringe at the idea of ever becoming an atheist because of this common attitude. I see and experience this with almost every non religious/atheist I've met- at school, Youtube comments section, on Yahoo answers and especially TSR. Sod it, I can't deal. The sad thing is this kind of behaviour also exists at the other end too, the fundamentalists. Surprisingly some of you guys are no different though you have different views
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    (Original post by Peroxidation)
    You're right we aren't. We share a common ancestry with them and we can prove this in many ways. Take a look at this DNA comparison for example, the DNA of great apes and humans is almost exactly the same! http://www.fliedner.es/media/modules...enema_19_6.jpg

    We also have an extensive fossil record which shows the transition of great ape ancestor species to humans and neanderthals.
    no we were created humans were not monkey

    (Original post by mackemforever)
    Well given that there is no proof at all that any kind of god exists, no proof of the existence of any kind of higher power, he obviously did a pretty **** job of giving us the ability to prove his existence...
    the human eye contains 90 million parts yet you use that fine, god gave you a brain, use it and comprehend, islam is about seeking knowledge things aren't black and white theres meaning behind them, we have a purpose to serve god
    (Original post by Tootles)
    PinkMobilePhone :lol:

    I've never really been scared of death since being a child, which is before I came to have religious faith.
    Bet you wouldnt say the same if a bus hit you.
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    (Original post by Cherry82)
    I feel like you guys who are not religious will never understand until you research about our religions and be in it for at least a day. Don't just assume.
    A fair few atheists/agnostics satisfy both of those conditions. Vehement opposition to religion (or anything else, for that matter) is not necessarily caused by ignorance.
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    Chimpanzee is our closet DNA comparison
    We even share 50% with a Banana.
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    I've actually heard of a psychological theory like this fairly recently - it's called 'Terror Management Theory', which says that humans created 'culture' as a coping mechanism for the fact that they are aware of their own mortality, in other words, drawing away from the fact that they know that sometime in the future, they will meet their inevitable death.

    The more you know.
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    (Original post by random_matt)
    Chimpanzee is our closet DNA comparison
    We even share 50% with a Banana.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    A fair few atheists/agnostics satisfy both those conditions. Vehement opposition to religion (or anything else, for that matter) is not necessarily caused by ignorance.
    See to those atheists/agnostics, I highly respect because they try to understand. With these types of of atheists I wouldn't at all mind having a friendly conversation with because I know there's no prejudging and false misconceptions that will be held against me for my beliefs.
    I would never say some of these things that others have said on here to any one, even if I was an atheist. The other day I saw comments such as 'religious people are evil, brainwashed freaks' and 'how could some be so stupid to believe in a sky daddy?'. They should ask us why to try and understand not throw insults like immature children.

    But this is for those who asked some questions. I just wanted to put it out there that being a Christian for me has been the best thing that has ever happened to me and no one forced it on me; it's something I've observed and entered.
    It's actually quite personal but I've never had so much compassion for life, people, animals, plants and the list goes on.
    Once I gave my life to Christ it was as if an eternal peace engulfed my nature and it's why even if the whole world was against him, I will always love him. Jesus' teachings are so breathtaking and depending on how others interpret it, it can be viewed figuratively, literally or as a mixture of both.

    But honestly guys I know this is random to say but he really did change my life for the better. There's so much positive energy and it's so strong to where I am sometimes so overwhelmed by it all that tears of joy roll out of my eyes. It's like a spiritual wakening. I don't know if other Christians experience this but I do.
    So this may sound extreme but he really did make me have a strong desire to better the world, it's people while helping to save our planet. I love you Jesus! Thank you xx
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    (Original post by Cherry82)
    See to those atheists/agnostics, I highly respect because they try to understand. With these types of of atheists I wouldn't at all mind having a friendly conversation with because I know there's no prejudging and false misconceptions that will be held against me for my beliefs.
    I would never say some of these things that others have said on here to any one, even if I was an atheist. The other day I saw comments such as 'religious people are evil, brainwashed freaks' and 'how could some be so stupid to believe in a sky daddy?'. They should ask us why to try and understand not throw insults like immature children.

    But this is for those who asked some questions. I just wanted to put it out there that being a Christian for me has been the best thing that has ever happened to me and no one forced it on me; it's something I've observed and entered.
    It's actually quite personal but I've never had so much compassion for life, people, animals, plants and the list goes on.
    Once I gave my life to Christ it was as if an eternal peace engulfed my nature and it's why even if the whole world was against him, I will always love him. Jesus' teachings are so breathtaking and depending on how others interpret it, it can be viewed figuratively, literally or as a mixture of both.

    But honestly guys I know this is random to say but he really did change my life for the better. There's so much positive energy and it's so strong to where I am sometimes so overwhelmed by it all that tears of joy roll out of my eyes. It's like a spiritual wakening. I don't know if other Christians experience this but I do.
    So this may sound extreme but he really did make me have a strong desire to better the world, it's people while helping to save our planet. I love you Jesus! Thank you xx
    Not in the UK, most secularised state in the world, it's dead.
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    (Original post by Cherry82)
    See to those atheists/agnostics, I highly respect because they try to understand. With these types of of atheists I wouldn't at all mind having a friendly conversation with because I know there's no prejudging and false misconceptions that will be held against me for my beliefs.
    I would never say some of these things that others have said on here to any one, even if I was an atheist. The other day I saw comments such as 'religious people are evil, brainwashed freaks' and 'how could some be so stupid to believe in a sky daddy?'. They should ask us why to try and understand not throw insults like immature children.
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    Again, all this is predicated on the assumption that atheists/agnostics who ridicule the religious beliefs of others are necessarily ignorant and those that don't are necessarily worthy of respect. The examples that you've cited (highlighted) are obviously examples of where the former is true, but this doesn't show that it's necessarily true. (It's also the case that, if you're going to insist that faith is so personal that the number of religions being practised right now is potentially equal to the number of religious people that are living right now, it's unreasonable to expect an atheist or agnostic person to be enlightened about what religious people think. Given the numbers and the fact that most people don't have endless time to expend on arguments about religion, it's just not possible.)

    I also doubt that you're as consistent as you think. You, as somebody who lives in the United Kingdom in the 21st century, are very likely to find some religious beliefs ludicrous and would not hold back from saying so if you're being honest with yourself -- if somebody stripped naked in the street and started worshipping the elements you would most likely, in practice, think that he'd lost his mind. You might not ridicule him but you would, privately at least, think that he was either stupid or deceived and would be very unlikely to buy the same argument from him that you're trying to sell to me here.

    He might say that you're misunderstanding him or prejudging him and that his belief in the omnipotence of the rivers is more complicated than you are giving it credit for, but would you be convinced by that? Call me judgemental, but I doubt that you would. So why make an exception for modern religions? I don't, and for that reason I feel pretty justified in ridiculing what, to me, seems like man-made nonsense not dissimilar to fire-worship. That doesn't make me ignorant, so long as I'm open to counter-arguments and refutations. It might mean that I'm not seen to be 'nice' or 'mature' (which, to me, often seems a case of people in glass houses) but, then, I don't exactly live to please people who don't like adversarial arguments. :rolleyes:

    To summarise: While it's arguable that mockery or ridicule of people's deeply-held convictions, religious or otherwise, is necessarily impolite, it is not necessarily indicative of ignorance of those convictions, especially when those convictions are apparently so personal that it's biologically impossible to fully educate oneself about them in a standard human lifetime.
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    (Original post by Tootles)
    PinkMobilePhone :lol:

    I've never really been scared of death since being a child, which is before I came to have religious faith.
    he knows nothing. I shall rename him Jon Snow
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    (Original post by Gul89)
    Bet you wouldnt say the same if a bus hit you.
    How do you know it hasn't?
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
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    Again, all this is predicated on the assumption that atheists/agnostics who ridicule the religious beliefs of others are necessarily ignorant and those that don't are necessarily worthy of respect. The examples that you've cited (highlighted) are obviously examples of where the former is true, but this doesn't show that it's necessarily true. (It's also the case that, if you're going to insist that faith is so personal that the number of religions being practised right now is potentially equal to the number of religious people that are living right now, it's unreasonable to expect an atheist or agnostic person to be enlightened about what religious people think. Given the numbers and the fact that most people don't have endless time to expend on arguments about religion, it's just not possible.)

    I also doubt that you're as consistent as you think. You, as somebody who lives in the United Kingdom in the 21st century, are very likely to find some religious beliefs ludicrous and would not hold back from saying so if you're being honest with yourself -- if somebody stripped naked in the street and started worshipping the elements you would most likely, in practice, think that he'd lost his mind. You might not ridicule him but you would, privately at least, think that he was either stupid or deceived and would be very unlikely to buy the same argument from him that you're trying to sell to me here.

    He might say that you're misunderstanding him or prejudging him and that his belief in the omnipotence of the rivers is more complicated than you are giving it credit for, but would you be convinced by that? Call me judgemental, but I doubt that you would. So why make an exception for modern religions? I don't, and for that reason I feel pretty justified in ridiculing what, to me, seems like man-made nonsense not dissimilar to fire-worship. That doesn't make me ignorant, so long as I'm open to counter-arguments and refutations. It might mean that I'm not seen to be 'nice' or 'mature' (which, to me, often seems a case of people in glass houses) but, then, I don't exactly live to please people who don't like adversarial arguments. :rolleyes:

    To summarise: While it's arguable that mockery or ridicule of people's deeply-held convictions, religious or otherwise, is necessarily impolite, it is not necessarily indicative of ignorance of those convictions, especially when those convictions are apparently so personal that it's biologically impossible to fully educate oneself about them in a standard human lifetime.
    'Again, all this is predicated on the assumption that atheists/agnostics who ridicule the religious beliefs of others are necessarily ignorant and those that don't are necessarily worthy of respect.'

    - Not exactly. I think you've misunderstood me a bit Hydeman.
    First and foremost, I don't respect those atheists/agnostics who ridicule religious people not those that disagree/ mocking the religious beliefs/ practices itself. There's actually a huge difference. I hope you can understand me.
    I'll give examples- If an atheist, after researching about Christian doctrines such as researched on the Eucharist and holy Communion then stated 'I think it's absurd that some Christians truly believe the Sunday bread and wine symbolises Jesus' body and blood', fair enough as he/she would be stating their opinion on known, actual beliefs that universally- Christians share. Christians such as me truly do believe this so I would not feel threatened as he/she is merely sharing their views/opinions on this practice. He/She has researched on it, is familiar with the belief but sees and has a different notion about the belief/practice- deeming it as diabolical.

    Now, addressing the scenario on here...some users stated insults addressing our intelligence as if our intelligence has anything to do with why we believe. None said anything concerning Islamic beliefs or Christians doctrines but instead directly attacked and prejudged religious people, generalising as a whole. Many made assumptions, with no research on the matter as it's evident since some even made inaccurate claims concerning certain religions. What made me quite angry was the fact that they even tried giving religious people the same reasons as if we don't share different faiths and beliefs. Also who are they to say why I believe in God? Since when were they me, my mind and the mind of all the other religious people? This is generalising. I don't agree with generalisations- often they are unreliable because they do not consider individuals. I understand that there are some atheists and agnostics who ridicule religious people because they are indeed aware of certain beliefs they may share so disagree with them which is fine. I'm aware of this, but concerning this scenario- there is a major difference.

    And notice the question held on this thread was 'do people believe in God because they are scared of death?'... notice the question was not 'why do people believe in God?' proving that there was already a preconceived notion on religious people and their reasons for believing in God. If OP really wanted to know why we believe in God, why not just ask 'religious people, why do you believe in God' then analyse the responses given from there?


    Going back on this issue, if these users had simply stated 'I can't understand why religious people believe in a God, it shocks me' compared to 'religious people are irrational, stupid beings'- with the first address, an open invitation for explanations is given as he/she would be admitting of not understanding us, attracting religious people to freely explain themselves. With the second address on the other hand, it would defer religious people from explaining themselves because already it seems that they are being insulted and most would probably feel afraid of being judged as already without their own explanation- they are being subjected, labelled as stupid. It's simply because of this I chose to not share my 'personal' reasons. Not that they were too personal to share with the public on here- I've actually shared this publicly before on TSR however because of the atmosphere of this particular thread- I feel very uncomfortable to do so. I feel like we deserve to be heard out for our own individual reasons without being generalised.

    'I also doubt that you're as consistent as you think'.
    -Actually that's quite true.
    I don't dispute this because it is true then again it all falls down to interpretation. Another thing is that, in Christianity, our bible was founded by Judaism. Our old testament is the Jewish Torah while the new testament is the add on containing the life of Jesus which differentiates the Bible and the Torah.
    Christians are followers of Christ so we often battle with the old testament due to the prevalent Jewish practices and doctrines. Christians are not Jews so it becomes difficult as we don't want to fully disregard the Old testament since it's a section of our bible but then again being Christian somehow leads to this. So it's true.

    This is why when atheists/agnostics tell me 'why do you eat Shellfish, pork and certain foods together or why do I mix certain fabric materials' I laugh in awe because it evidently proves their lack of knowledge on Christianity and this subject. These are Jewish beliefs and practices not Christian ones. Christians don't practice Kashrut/Kosher laws, we look at moral laws. Most of us believe after Jesus had died on the cross that these ceremonial/civil practices became unnecessary since he was the ultimate atonement for everyone's sins. Jews overall believe that their messiah hasn't arrived yet which is why they use these practices to atone for their own sins. Why I totally agree with your statement concerning my consistency is because even in Christianity, we have many dominations where we disagree and agree with certain things so I find it difficult at times in knowing which direction to follow. We don't all agree on the for example the meaning of specific passages for example and between the dominations, there can often be a lot of differences.

    Lastly, concerning the comparison you made- 'if somebody stripped naked in the street and started worshipping the elements you would most likely, in practice, think that he'd lost his mind.'
    No. I actually would not in the moment of it happening or even privately think he is stupid or deceived because I do not know his personal religious reasons that motivated his acts. I could say I believe the act itself was stupid because I may not agree with his actions but I would not call him stupid or deceived. This was what I was talking about earlier. Of course, I'd obviously be in shock and awe but I'd mainly wonder why he did this and actually try to research to find/see maybe what motivated him to perform this way. After researching and possibly finding his reason, I may think wow I disagree with this reason, I think this possible reason of his is ludicrous then move on. This really is me, this isn't me trying to sugar coat any thing.
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    (Original post by Gul89)
    people who believe are religious and believe in god AREN'T scared of death, why would you if you are doing good, surely when death awaits you'll have nothing to hide and you'll go to paradise.
    In a way it could be though - humans have a tendency to seek rational explanations for things, and such an unknown concept like death would lead us to attempt to find a reason for it, as well as a way of comforting ourselves from the fear of the unknown - events after death.

    Because nobody has died and lived to tell the tale.
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    Well, I class myself as agnostic, and I am 100% sure that some people are in a religion because they are scared that they will end up going to hell after they die.
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    (Original post by Gul89)
    no we were created humans were not monkey

    the human eye contains 90 million parts yet you use that fine, god gave you a brain, use it and comprehend, islam is about seeking knowledge things aren't black and white theres meaning behind them, we have a purpose to serve god
    For someone who follows a religion which is about "seeking knowledge" you sure don't seem to be in the know about the world. You even shut your mind to the fact that evolution is correct, we share a common ancestor with other primates and this has been proven in too many ways to count.

    Things are black and white. As a physicist I can assure you that there is a rational explanation for everything, that there is no magic pixie sitting in the clouds and that there's no deeper meaning to things. Things behave according to the laws that govern them. You don't see two protons attracting each other through the electrostatic force because the electrostatic force causes two particles with the same charge orientations to repel each other. If one was an electron they'd attract each other. This is a basic fact. It tells you why charged particles experience attractive and repulsive forces when in a close proximity to other charges - it doesn't give you a deep philosophical meaning behind it.

    I'd also like to point out the irony of your statement. You claim to follow a religion that "seeks knowledge." In reality all religion does is limit your ability to think independently and rationally. It was the cause of the dark ages, because it provides an un-testable answer to everything - "God did it," "God wants it that way," "because God," etc. Such answers lead only to the hindrance of progress which is why you were considered old at 30 in the dark ages - they didn't bother finding new medicines, they just prayed and it didn't do a thing. The enlightenment (the point about 300 years ago when people realized that prayer wasn't working and got off their knees to go and look for actual solutions to problems) is what gave us everything we have today. Nowadays our average life expectancy has risen to 75 years, that's a 50 year increase over the dark ages. Religion didn't do that (in the thousands of years it had to do so), science did.
 
 
 
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