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How would you feel if a hijabi was flirting with you? Watch

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    • #2
    #2

    (Original post by bob5124)
    That's a lie. The hijab is not a requirement, and it is not even mentioned in the Quran. It is a cultural item, and people are often brainwashed into thinking that you have to be a Muslim to wear a hijab, and that you have to wear a hijab to be a Muslim. This is a consequence of people not having a proper understanding of their own religion.
    Actually I have studied the religion (and continue to do so) - I wasn't brainwashed. If YOU knew the religion then you would understand that the ruling for hijab comes from both hadith and the Quran. The Quran refers to covering oneself but hadith refers more specifically where the body (and head) is covered.
    No one says you have to wear hijab to be Muslim. Not carrying out a fardh (obligatory) action does not invalidate the shahadah (testimoney of faith) of a Muslim.

    Learn about the religion yourself if you want to accuse others of not knowing, mate.
    • #4
    #4

    Dunno how I'd feel, I guess I'd just sit back and wait until some bearded dude tries to honour-kill her
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    It's sad to see a minor few feel so offended at the prospect of being flirted by a girl, simply because of a piece of clothing.
    • #5
    #5

    A year ago a girl who happens to wear a hijab started flirting with me and asked me out, despite not knowing her at all... so I declined. Well then her true colours shone through and her and her 'hijabi crew' started spreading stuff behind my back and made comments about my own religious beliefs (I'm a muslim too). Morale of the story? Just because they wear a piece of cloth on their head, doesn't make them any better or morally orientated than any other person.
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    The hijab isnt some bloody protective shield that stops you from sinning. If they want to flirt - let them do so. You mind your own business.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    You have to understand that there are many sects of Islam. Some will say you have to wear it and some will say you don't. Just like the niqab.
    And Muslims don't just follow the Quran, there's also the sunna.
    The two branches of sects (Shia and Sunni) both say hijab is wajib. Non-mainstream sub-sects from these two branches, which are only followed by relatively tiny quantities of people, can be ignored on matters of fiqh. The necessity of Niqab is a difference of opinion even within the main sects, so you are right on that bit though...
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Sameera97)
    The two branches of sects (Shia and Sunni) both say hijab is wajib. Non-mainstream sub-sects from these two branches, which are only followed by relatively tiny quantities of people, can be ignored on matters of fiqh. The necessity of Niqab is a difference of opinion even within the main sects, so you are right on that bit though...
    There's also Sufi and many more. Sunni and Shia are most common.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    There's also Sufi and many more. Sunni and Shia are most common.
    Sufism isn't a sect - Sufism is the foundation of some Shia/Sunni sub-sects. Sufism is a way of life focused on disregarding the material world and focusing on internalising all the key concepts of worship and character in order to establish a closer relstionship with God. Sufi 'orders' or branches e.g. Chishti Sufis, Naqshbandi Sufis etc are sub-sects of Sunni Islam. Members of these sub-sects still largely defer to the legal rulings of the main Sunnis/Shia groups, but they may also disregard legal rulings because of their own cultural habits (rather than a difference in opinion based on scripture)
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    (Original post by Dunno Tha Dunno)
    Why are you always the first to make a post on nearly every thread?

    Every time I click a thread you are first to the mark.
    How many is it now 100? XD
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Sameera97)
    Sufism isn't a sect - Sufism is the foundation of some Shia/Sunni sub-sects. Sufism is a way of life focused on disregarding the material world and focusing on internalising all the key concepts of worship and character in order to establish a closer relstionship with God. Sufi 'orders' or branches e.g. Chishti Sufis, Naqshbandi Sufis etc are sub-sects of Sunni Islam. Members of these sub-sects still largely defer to the legal rulings of the main Sunnis/Shia groups, but they may also disregard legal rulings because of their own cultural habits (rather than a difference in opinion based on scripture)
    Sufi is a sect. You're getting confused. Sub-sects of sunni for example are Hanafi, Maliki, Shafi'i and Hanbali which can also be called school of law, Sufi are there own sect since they don't follow any of that.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Sufi is a sect. You're getting confused. Sub-sects of sunni for example are Hanafi, Maliki, Shafi'i and Hanbali which can also be called school of law, Sufi are there own sect since they don't follow any of that.
    I'm afraid you are getting confused - those schools are simply madhabs. A madhab is a school of law like you said, but they are not sub-sects. Sufis still follow one of these schools of law to some degree as I said, but their aqeedah can be derived from either Sunnism or Shi'ism, so their orders are sub-sects of one of these two branches... on the other hand, Hanafis, Malikis, Shafi'is, Hanbalis differ in legal ruling because their manhaj is different but they share the same aqeedah, therefore they are the same sect.
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    (Original post by bob5124)
    That's a lie. The hijab is not a requirement, and it is not even mentioned in the Quran. It is a cultural item, and people are often brainwashed into thinking that you have to be a Muslim to wear a hijab, and that you have to wear a hijab to be a Muslim. This is a consequence of people not having a proper understanding of their own religion.
    bob?
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Sameera97)
    I'm afraid you are getting confused - those schools are simply madhabs. A madhab is a school of law like you said, but they are not sub-sects. Sufis still follow one of these schools of law to some degree as I said, but their aqeedah can be derived from either Sunnism or Shi'ism, so their orders are sub-sects of one of these two branches... on the other hand, Hanafis, Malikis, Shafi'is, Hanbalis differ in legal ruling because their manhaj is different but they share the same aqeedah, therefore they are the same sect.
    The Sufi you are talking about are called Sufi Sunni or Shia, they follow all the traditional aspects of prayer, charity and fasting that other Muslims do, but they also practice dhikr, a chanting of Muslim scripture and invocation of the divine names of God.
    The sect of Sufi are different, they are Islamic mystics. Sufis go beyond external requirements of the religion to seek a personal experience of God through forms of meditation and spiritual growth
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    (Original post by bob5124)
    That's a lie. The hijab is not a requirement, and it is not even mentioned in the Quran. It is a cultural item, and people are often brainwashed into thinking that you have to be a Muslim to wear a hijab, and that you have to wear a hijab to be a Muslim. This is a consequence of people not having a proper understanding of their own religion.
    Oh sorry, I didn't realise you were a muslim scholar who's studied all of the Quran and hadith. That's real impressive; I guess I'll come to you for all my islamic queries from now on.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    It's 100% obligatory according to the clear evidences in the Quran and secondly, it is by scholarly consensus that one who denies that the hijaab is obligatory is no longer a Muslim. GTHO.
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    Scared
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    I would tell her she is a hypocrite.
    • #2
    #2

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    The Sufi you are talking about are called Sufi Sunni or Shia, they follow all the traditional aspects of prayer, charity and fasting that other Muslims do, but they also practice dhikr, a chanting of Muslim scripture and invocation of the divine names of God.
    The sect of Sufi are different, they are Islamic mystics. Sufis go beyond external requirements of the religion to seek a personal experience of God through forms of meditation and spiritual growth
    The type of sufi I am on about are Sufis generally and true to the historical definition. Even these unIslamic mystics that you refer to have their foundations in Shi'ism or Sunnism through their spiritual heritage - they say their (teacher's teacher)^100 was Ali or Abu Bakr, for example, and naturally if they have claimed hertiage to Abu Bakr for example, then they have clear Sunni heritage since Shia reject Abu Bakr... can you give me an example of a Sufi group which has foundation in neither Shi'ism or Sunnism (not asking in a condescending way, genuinely curious if there is one)?
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    (Original post by Butternuts96)
    Oh sorry, I didn't realise you were a muslim scholar who's studied all of the Quran and hadith. That's real impressive; I guess I'll come to you for all my islamic queries from now on.

    It's 100% obligatory according to the clear evidences in the Quran and secondly, it is by scholarly consensus that one who denies that the hijaab is obligatory is no longer a Muslim. GTHO.
    You are outright making things up. The Quran calls for both male and female Muslims to be modest, and it then continues to say that they should cover up their sex organs. It's a rather bizarre interpretation to decide that for a female to be modest, they should cover themselves from head to toe, but that males conveniently don't need to do so. As you have already been told, the Quran does not even mention the hijab.

    Perhaps your chosen scholar just has an agenda because he seems to see things that are not there.
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    The veil was neither compulsory nor widely adopted until generations after Muhammad’s death, when a large body of male scriptural and legal scholars began using their religious and political authority to regain the dominance they had lost in society as a result of the Prophet’s egalitarian reforms
    - Aslan, Reza (2005). No God but God. Random House. p. 66

    Other scholars point out that the Qur'an does not require women to wear veils; rather, it was a social habit picked up with the expansion of Islam. In fact, since it was impractical for working women to wear veils, "A veiled woman silently announced that her husband was rich enough to keep her idle."
    - Ahmed, Leila (1992). Women and Gender in Islam. New Haven: Yale University Press. p. 56.
 
 
 
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