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    If you're considering communiting from home to university, it is totally do-able, here's everything thing you need to know to help make your decision.

    I have commuted from Newcastle to Carlisle for 2 years now studying a really intensive nursing course while still living at home (1 hour and half away). It's been quite a challenging at times and sometimes I thought I wish I just moved out from home and lived at uni, but I have everything at home including a boyfriend, really close family , friends, part time job (when I can), and brilliant home environment to do all of my work.

    An hour and half may sound a lot but when you're getting the train it's really not. In the morning you're likely going to have 9/10 am lectures meaning early mornings and early trains - perfect for a cup of tea and the best opportunity to sleep! Coming home, sleep if you need to, or make use of the time by doing your work, reading lecture notes and books, organising. There's an hours and a half done. Most likely more than what your class mates have done.

    Using the train is cheaper and more practical than driving. Buying a rail card and booking your tickets in advance will save you even more money too. Something rediculous like 60%. For example a return day ticket to carlisle from Newcastle = £20 (expensive), Student Rail Card price =£13 (not bad), Student Rail Card booked in advance ticket = £4.20 each way (cheap as chips) so you can get to and from uni for £8.40 a day...62 miles in the car each way is not going to cost that. Never mind the 1000s of miles you would be banging on a car, the price of the car to buy, insurance, if something goes wrong with it. Trains are best.

    Know exactly how long it takes to get to the station from uni, learn the short cuts. If a train is coming at 3:30 and your lecture ends at 3:30, leave the lecture. Chances are the 10 minutes you left the lecture for the jog to the station are not going to be all that important and you'd probably have to wait an hour for the next one. Get the last ten minutes of anything important from a friend.

    Use a backpack. It is way easier to run for your train wearing a backpack, you can pack more things you need, it's no where near as heavy as carrying your books, notes, ipad/laptop on your arm. It's just 100x easier.

    Invest in a good coat! Early mornings at the station can be really cold. A good coat that is super warm, light weight and stylish will be your number 1 item to surviving commuting. A one that covers your bum will mean you can sit at bus stop, on outdoor benches or station seats while you wait. If I has a hood you won't need an umbrella (heavy, hard to store). Make sure it goes with everything, a colour like black or grey is ideal, matches with almost everything, can wear everyday. If it's light weight you can roll it up into your bag during your day. A feather down coat ticks all the boxes!

    A good pair of shoes. Comfy for traveling, walking/running easily in them, stylish - still important. Cosy so you're not cold. I recommend Ugg Riding boots (proper shoes not the sheepskin boots) or Doc Martens. They're both hard wearing, waterproof, warm and will last so long. 100% worth the money.

    Let people know that you commute. It might get you some free lifts to the station if your ever pushed for time, or even a lift home from students travelling home for the weekend. Your lectures will consider that you may be 10 minutes earlier leaving, or a couple of minutes late for the lesson.

    Travel light. People say that a flask of tea it key for travelling. It's not. Flasks are heavy, even when they are empty. They're bulky and you have to carry that bugger around all day. Buy a cuppa if you need one, or take a tea bag in you lunch box and ask for hot water. Weighs nothing.

    You probably won't need to take your laptop. 9/10 your lecturer will be using a PowerPoint, and you can take notes in your pad. They will put the power points online for you to see before the lesson or after. A a notebook doesn't weigh much either. If you really need to use your laptop at uni, get a USB pen and use the computers at uni. Or buy an iPad min, you can use Word, PowerPoint, Dropbox, email and one drive on an iPad and even buy a case with a keyboard attached, wayyyyy easier than taking your laptop plus the charger is way smaller too!

    Go to bed early and eat plenty!
    Your days will be long and probably tiring, fuel up as much as possible, but look forward to the fact when you get home you are HOME, your own bed, tea with family, the lot.

    I hope this helps anyone deciding on what to do about uni. Commuting is way cheaper than halls, so don't forget to treat yourself once in awhile because you probably just saved yourself about £5,000 worth or rent. It's also not that bad when you know what you're doing, and transport is really reliable. Even on an intense course like mine it's easy doing it 4-5 days a week.
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    But, you are kind of missing out on the whole point of university by staying at home, like me.
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    I disagree, the whole point of me going to university is to get my degree?
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    (Original post by katie.mayne)
    If you're considering communiting from home to university, it is totally do-able, here's everything thing you need to know to help make your decision.

    I have commuted from Newcastle to Carlisle for 2 years now studying a really intensive nursing course while still living at home (1 hour and half away). It's been quite a challenging at times and sometimes I thought I wish I just moved out from home and lived at uni, but I have everything at home including a boyfriend, really close family , friends, part time job (when I can), and brilliant home environment to do all of my work.

    An hour and half may sound a lot but when you're getting the train it's really not. In the morning you're likely going to have 9/10 am lectures meaning early mornings and early trains - perfect for a cup of tea and the best opportunity to sleep! Coming home, sleep if you need to, or make use of the time by doing your work, reading lecture notes and books, organising. There's an hours and a half done. Most likely more than what your class mates have done.

    Using the train is cheaper and more practical than driving. Buying a rail card and booking your tickets in advance will save you even more money too. Something rediculous like 60%. For example a return day ticket to carlisle from Newcastle = £20 (expensive), Student Rail Card price =£13 (not bad), Student Rail Card booked in advance ticket = £4.20 each way (cheap as chips) so you can get to and from uni for £8.40 a day...62 miles in the car each way is not going to cost that. Never mind the 1000s of miles you would be banging on a car, the price of the car to buy, insurance, if something goes wrong with it. Trains are best.

    Know exactly how long it takes to get to the station from uni, learn the short cuts. If a train is coming at 3:30 and your lecture ends at 3:30, leave the lecture. Chances are the 10 minutes you left the lecture for the jog to the station are not going to be all that important and you'd probably have to wait an hour for the next one. Get the last ten minutes of anything important from a friend.

    Use a backpack. It is way easier to run for your train wearing a backpack, you can pack more things you need, it's no where near as heavy as carrying your books, notes, ipad/laptop on your arm. It's just 100x easier.

    Invest in a good coat! Early mornings at the station can be really cold. A good coat that is super warm, light weight and stylish will be your number 1 item to surviving commuting. A one that covers your bum will mean you can sit at bus stop, on outdoor benches or station seats while you wait. If I has a hood you won't need an umbrella (heavy, hard to store). Make sure it goes with everything, a colour like black or grey is ideal, matches with almost everything, can wear everyday. If it's light weight you can roll it up into your bag during your day. A feather down coat ticks all the boxes!

    A good pair of shoes. Comfy for traveling, walking/running easily in them, stylish - still important. Cosy so you're not cold. I recommend Ugg Riding boots (proper shoes not the sheepskin boots) or Doc Martens. They're both hard wearing, waterproof, warm and will last so long. 100% worth the money.

    Let people know that you commute. It might get you some free lifts to the station if your ever pushed for time, or even a lift home from students travelling home for the weekend. Your lectures will consider that you may be 10 minutes earlier leaving, or a couple of minutes late for the lesson.

    Travel light. People say that a flask of tea it key for travelling. It's not. Flasks are heavy, even when they are empty. They're bulky and you have to carry that bugger around all day. Buy a cuppa if you need one, or take a tea bag in you lunch box and ask for hot water. Weighs nothing.

    You probably won't need to take your laptop. 9/10 your lecturer will be using a PowerPoint, and you can take notes in your pad. They will put the power points online for you to see before the lesson or after. A a notebook doesn't weigh much either. If you really need to use your laptop at uni, get a USB pen and use the computers at uni. Or buy an iPad min, you can use Word, PowerPoint, Dropbox, email and one drive on an iPad and even buy a case with a keyboard attached, wayyyyy easier than taking your laptop plus the charger is way smaller too!

    Go to bed early and eat plenty!
    Your days will be long and probably tiring, fuel up as much as possible, but look forward to the fact when you get home you are HOME, your own bed, tea with family, the lot.

    I hope this helps anyone deciding on what to do about uni. Commuting is way cheaper than halls, so don't forget to treat yourself once in awhile because you probably just saved yourself about £5,000 worth or rent. It's also not that bad when you know what you're doing, and transport is really reliable. Even on an intense course like mine it's easy doing it 4-5 days a week.
    So people can make an informed choice and in the sense of a fair debate here is another side

    Some of you Applying for 2016/2017 entry will doubtless be considering or actually feel sure that you will be living at home I feel that there are a few things you guys need to consider before applying as many of you will be starting your UCAS forms very soon I thought I'd post this now you know to give you time to mull it over.

    1\ Cost: This is usually one of the most deciding factors when people decide to live at home while in some faces it can be cheaper to live at home in many cases it's not. a bog standard hall costs around £60 or £90 for en-suite if we look at an example of my brothers first year he had 4 days in uni (3-4 days is usual for first years for some courses like engineering or medicine it can be 5 days) it would now cost him with a student rail card £20 a day which would be£80 a weeks by living in halls he could save £20 which is more than enough fora weeks food shop he could even have afforded a visit home with those savings.A week at uni could look like this budget wise

    Rent £90 aprox Food £15-£20 lunch £20:00 aprox Night out £50

    so your looking at£180 (but not everyone goes out every night )so its more like £140 That can of course be cut down if you bring lunch and don't eat out all the time it' £120 and if you learn to shop making use of the discount ale at your local super market (it's all about timing) and special offers like 3 for 2 your food cost can go down at least £5 so your looking at £115 if not less. if your commuting your week looks like this train fares:£100 based on Reading - Southampton lunch £20 Something to eat on the return train £10 Bus home £20 your looking at £150 even at the higher bracket in my example it's cheaper to go in to halls. You also get less loan if your a home student.

    2\Travel:This is one of the main things that People talk about a lot but don't see it until they are at uni travelling is tiring and can be expensive it also is time consuming you may think oh I can get work done on the train. More often thannot you won't you can do work on trains as in organise meetings sort out yourfiles but academic work is never done or done well above a level standard on atrain. Also it is time consuming a 2 hour train journey in to uni and out is2-4 hours gone which you could use for studying or other things.

    3\Social life: How social do you want to be unless you are a 10 minute walk or have very accommodating parents who are happy to pick you up at all hours or you can go out without drinking and drive home your social life will not be as good as those living out especially in the first 3-4 months the first 2 months are often pretty lonely for commuting students.Students who live out generally go out 2-3 a week Sometime more if they have an "easy"course load I actually never saw a commuting student out in the 4 years I spent at uni. it's not all clubbing (Some is) you have awards ceremonies meals out drinks with mates parties cinema club things like skiing for instance trips out say to Milton Keyns (skiing) and so much more most are decided on spur of the moment or that day which is usually why you won't see as many out so often not to mention they have to get the last train or whatever .

    I have seen so often on here threads saying I've made no friends it usually turns out later on that they live at home and that is the honest to goodness truth you usually see it around November.

    4\ The Timetable: no one ever considers this but this is not school or collage or even work this is a completely different beast altogether. Your time table could have excellent days with hour long breaks between lectures which is nice you can get work done etc etc. Or you could get 9-8 or even 9-9 I saw once with only a 1 hour break for lunch not good would you really want a long journey after that didn't think so. or what about a day where you have a lecture from 9-10 and then another from 6-7 and nothing in between sure you could work in the library but not for more than 4 hours effectively and still get the full benefit from the lectures. Where do you going in the mean time?

    So how do you avoid these pit falls I would do a dry run especially to avoid points 1 and 2 to avoid point 4 on your dry run do it on a week day and find out if there is any where you can see the time table usually (on the factually or course notice board) just ask at reception they will give you directions.point 3 is something only you can know and you will have to use your judgement. It's also a good idea to do a full costing (using Excel) over a week and a year to see if and how much you actually save or if you'll be out of pocket.

    5\Location: This one is pretty obvious but it's well worth mentioning if you are determined to stay at home you'll only apply to "local" universities for instance if you live in Cornwall but you are Oxford material you would be passing up an opportunity that many would give their right arm for. (Infact even if you lived 15 miles away you would have to take halls it's just one of their rules.).So don't limit your self like that whatever you do. with all that said is there any circumstances where living at home is a good idea well yes there are a few.
    1/ if your sole carer for an ill or infirm relative or the responsibilities for younger siblings fall to you for that reason.

    2/ If You have a child of you own .(Some universities offer halls that cater for this but not all do)

    3/ if you are so physically disabled you can't be without a carer then living at home might be better.
    Many people will mention the pros and cons of commuting and staying home but these questions hopefully help you decide what to do.
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    (Original post by katie.mayne)
    If you're considering communiting from home to university, it is totally do-able, here's everything thing you need to know to help make your decision.

    I have commuted from Newcastle to Carlisle for 2 years now studying a really intensive nursing course while still living at home (1 hour and half away). It's been quite a challenging at times and sometimes I thought I wish I just moved out from home and lived at uni, but I have everything at home including a boyfriend, really close family , friends, part time job (when I can), and brilliant home environment to do all of my work.

    An hour and half may sound a lot but when you're getting the train it's really not. In the morning you're likely going to have 9/10 am lectures meaning early mornings and early trains - perfect for a cup of tea and the best opportunity to sleep! Coming home, sleep if you need to, or make use of the time by doing your work, reading lecture notes and books, organising. There's an hours and a half done. Most likely more than what your class mates have done.

    Using the train is cheaper and more practical than driving. Buying a rail card and booking your tickets in advance will save you even more money too. Something rediculous like 60%. For example a return day ticket to carlisle from Newcastle = £20 (expensive), Student Rail Card price =£13 (not bad), Student Rail Card booked in advance ticket = £4.20 each way (cheap as chips) so you can get to and from uni for £8.40 a day...62 miles in the car each way is not going to cost that. Never mind the 1000s of miles you would be banging on a car, the price of the car to buy, insurance, if something goes wrong with it. Trains are best.

    Know exactly how long it takes to get to the station from uni, learn the short cuts. If a train is coming at 3:30 and your lecture ends at 3:30, leave the lecture. Chances are the 10 minutes you left the lecture for the jog to the station are not going to be all that important and you'd probably have to wait an hour for the next one. Get the last ten minutes of anything important from a friend.

    Use a backpack. It is way easier to run for your train wearing a backpack, you can pack more things you need, it's no where near as heavy as carrying your books, notes, ipad/laptop on your arm. It's just 100x easier.

    Invest in a good coat! Early mornings at the station can be really cold. A good coat that is super warm, light weight and stylish will be your number 1 item to surviving commuting. A one that covers your bum will mean you can sit at bus stop, on outdoor benches or station seats while you wait. If I has a hood you won't need an umbrella (heavy, hard to store). Make sure it goes with everything, a colour like black or grey is ideal, matches with almost everything, can wear everyday. If it's light weight you can roll it up into your bag during your day. A feather down coat ticks all the boxes!

    A good pair of shoes. Comfy for traveling, walking/running easily in them, stylish - still important. Cosy so you're not cold. I recommend Ugg Riding boots (proper shoes not the sheepskin boots) or Doc Martens. They're both hard wearing, waterproof, warm and will last so long. 100% worth the money.

    Let people know that you commute. It might get you some free lifts to the station if your ever pushed for time, or even a lift home from students travelling home for the weekend. Your lectures will consider that you may be 10 minutes earlier leaving, or a couple of minutes late for the lesson.

    Travel light. People say that a flask of tea it key for travelling. It's not. Flasks are heavy, even when they are empty. They're bulky and you have to carry that bugger around all day. Buy a cuppa if you need one, or take a tea bag in you lunch box and ask for hot water. Weighs nothing.

    You probably won't need to take your laptop. 9/10 your lecturer will be using a PowerPoint, and you can take notes in your pad. They will put the power points online for you to see before the lesson or after. A a notebook doesn't weigh much either. If you really need to use your laptop at uni, get a USB pen and use the computers at uni. Or buy an iPad min, you can use Word, PowerPoint, Dropbox, email and one drive on an iPad and even buy a case with a keyboard attached, wayyyyy easier than taking your laptop plus the charger is way smaller too!

    Go to bed early and eat plenty!
    Your days will be long and probably tiring, fuel up as much as possible, but look forward to the fact when you get home you are HOME, your own bed, tea with family, the lot.

    I hope this helps anyone deciding on what to do about uni. Commuting is way cheaper than halls, so don't forget to treat yourself once in awhile because you probably just saved yourself about £5,000 worth or rent. It's also not that bad when you know what you're doing, and transport is really reliable. Even on an intense course like mine it's easy doing it 4-5 days a week.
    Thank you! Someone who agrees with me. Although I did try halls at first (I was given really bad accommodation because my uni was my insurance), it was nothing like I had expected and I practically ended up commuting from my halls to my lecture anyway (40min bus journey). I decided enough was enough and moved out in October. I commute from London to Oxford (1hr 30 min) 3 days a week and I actually end up doing more work on the train than I did in halls in my room because of all the distractions of my flatmates. Because I've been doing work in my room at home ever since I started school, it's more comfortable for me to concentrate. And I completely agree, I always look forward after lectures to just come home, have a cuppa and wind down. It's the best feeling knowing that you can leave the stress of uni behind
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    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    4\ The Timetable: no one ever considers this but this is not school or collage or even work this is a completely different beast altogether. Your time table could have excellent days with hour long breaks between lectures which is nice you can get work done etc etc. Or you could get 9-8 or even 9-9 I saw once with only a 1 hour break for lunch not good would you really want a long journey after that didn't think so. or what about a day where you have a lecture from 9-10 and then another from 6-7 and nothing in between sure you could work in the library but not for more than 4 hours effectively and still get the full benefit from the lectures. Where do you going in the mean time?
    This is true. I was lucky that I was either in for a few hours, all day, (with an hour for lunch) half a day or I wasn't in at all. I lived with someone who moaned because her timetable had her in at 9.30am until 10.30 and nothing after. That hour in between, (I had a few days like that) was enough to get a bit of work done. But it wasn't too long that I'd get bored.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    This is true. I was lucky that I was either in for a few hours, all day, (with an hour for lunch) half a day or I wasn't in at all. I lived with someone who moaned because her timetable had her in at 9.30am until 10.30 and nothing after. That hour in between, (I had a few days like that) was enough to get a bit of work done. But it wasn't too long that I'd get bored.
    I know right i herd people moaning "oh I've got 9-1PM my life sucks" I had 9-7 on one day and 10-8 (later changed back to 9-7) on another that was in my first year second year was crazy9-10 then a 9 hour break and then a 6-7 it was insane.
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    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    I know right i herd people moaning "oh I've got 9-1PM my life sucks" I had 9-7 on one day and 10-8 (later changed back to 9-7) on another that was in my first year second year was crazy9-10 then a 9 hour break and then a 6-7 it was insane.
    That and then a 1-2 hour commute? No thanks.
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    Some unis are more suited to commuting such as BPP where the lectures are all online and so seminars will be spread through 3 days a week (or at least I read this last year). Saying that even here you need flexibility for modules that require group work so you should take that into account.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    That and then a 1-2 hour commute? No thanks.
    exactly it just makes no sense why someone would commute with a timetable like that.
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    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    exactly it just makes no sense why someone would commute with a timetable like that.
    some people don't have any other options//
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    (Original post by lizmoo0721)
    some people don't have any other options//
    but the majority do
 
 
 
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