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    So I've had anxiety foy years now, and nothing really seems to help. I read about trying to fight it, does not help instead you should just "accept it" untill the trigger goes away.


    Has anyone tried this and has it helped? Or anyone they know?
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    I would recommend speaking to a professional about it but it is something to look into if you feel that it might help, mental illness is so difficult to tackle sometimes because we're told its 'in our heads' as if that makes any easier to deal with than any other illness but you can get past it, good luck op
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    I have been referred twice but still end up in the park flashing my widgy at female joggers
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    I think just "accepting it" would make things definitely worse in the long term.


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    (Original post by Betelgeuse-)
    I have been referred twice but still end up in the park flashing my widgy at female joggers
    Not that kind of exposure ........lol.
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    (Original post by triphazards)
    I think just "accepting it" would make things definitely worse in the long term.


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    I think the point is the more you tried to fight it the stronger the anxiety gets. I think you would still teach yourself the right way of thinking in the long run.
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    That is pretty much exactly what the books of Dr Claire Weekes taught me to do and it was the only thing that got me out of being housebound from panic attacks so I can't recommend this approach enough but it's not easy and you fail a lot at the start but it does become easier and you'll notice improvements in yourself and your anxiety day by day once you get used to accepting and just in a way, giving into your physical anxiety symptoms and the scary thoughts instead of trying to stop them from coming. Trying to stop them from happening only creates more tension which makes you more likely to panic. Accepting is simple but its not easy but it can be done with patience and practice.

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    (Original post by Spock's Socks)
    That is pretty much exactly what the books of Dr Claire Weekes taught me to do and it was the only thing that got me out of being housebound from panic attacks so I can't recommend this approach enough but it's not easy and you fail a lot at the start but it does become easier and you'll notice improvements in yourself and your anxiety day by day once you get used to accepting and just in a way, giving into your physical anxiety symptoms and the scary thoughts instead of trying to stop them from coming. Trying to stop them from happening only creates more tension which makes you more likely to panic. Accepting is simple but its not easy but it can be done with patience and practice.

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    Thanks for your response, my symptoms are not really a problem for me its just my thoughts. Don't you think tho we need to counteract these thoughts for the long run to stop the thoughts coming in the first place e.g. "my friend blocked me" to "wait no he probably changed his number"?
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    (Original post by Nununu)
    I think the point is the more you tried to fight it the stronger the anxiety gets. I think you would still teach yourself the right way of thinking in the long run.
    I completely disagree with you. The more you fight anxiety, the less it will become a problem. You have to tackle anxiety in order to overcome it. If you just accept it, you are feeding* the disorder and are doing what it wants and as a result are avoiding the situation. Not only are you are then welcoming yourself to a whole host of avoidance disorders, but also panic attack disorder, where you avoid the situation because you don't want to have a panic attack (this also could develop into GAD or agoraphobia).
    Also If you experience anxiety in 'common' settings such as in a workplace environment, or at school, then by choosing to avoid those situations, will have serious consequences on your quality of life, ESPECIALLY in the long term.
    Tackling anxiety 'head on' is seriously tough, however is possible in small steps and may be aided with therapy and or medication, but by avoiding it, is not the answer.


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    It has worked for me but it's a slow process and you have to work really hard to challenge your feelings/beliefs about whatever it is that is the source of your anxiety. I was having it via cbt for health anxiety and agoraphobia.
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    (Original post by triphazards)
    I completely disagree with you. The more you fight anxiety, the less it will become a problem. You have to tackle anxiety in order to overcome it. If you just accept it, you are feeding* the disorder and are doing what it wants and as a result are avoiding the situation. Not only are you are then welcoming yourself to a whole host of avoidance disorders, but also panic attack disorder, where you avoid the situation because you don't want to have a panic attack (this also could develop into GAD or agoraphobia).
    Also If you experience anxiety in 'common' settings such as in a workplace environment, or at school, then by choosing to avoid those situations, will have serious consequences on your quality of life, ESPECIALLY in the long term.
    Tackling anxiety 'head on' is seriously tough, however is possible in small steps and may be aided with therapy and or medication, but by avoiding it, is not the answer.


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    No I think you are misunderstanding what I am saying. I am not saying you should avoid anything. I never avoid any situation. However say I am in a situation that I get axious walking down a road and i see someone else coming the other way, instead of having coping mechanisims I just continue walking. So yeah I feel anxious for a bit but I just allow myself to feel anxious and then over time the anxiety of that situation lessens.
    Does that make sense?
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    (Original post by Little Popcorns)
    It has worked for me but it's a slow process and you have to work really hard to challenge your feelings/beliefs about whatever it is that is the source of your anxiety. I was having it via cbt for health anxiety and agoraphobia.
    Do you think challenging your beliefs has helped to stop other thoughts from coming?
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    I think CBT is good at tackling specific issues, for example if you have social anxiety or are scared of taking public transport, basically specified fears. For generalised anxiety though, it can be good to learn techniques but if it's a chemical imbalance then it's not going to stop the anxiety. That said, I think it should always be the first port of call before going on meds.
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    (Original post by Nununu)
    Thanks for your response, my symptoms are not really a problem for me its just my thoughts. Don't you think tho we need to counteract these thoughts for the long run to stop the thoughts coming in the first place e.g. "my friend blocked me" to "wait no he probably changed his number"?
    The exact same method I used for my symptoms can be used for thoughts too. I was taught to both accept my scary, sad or upsetting thoughts no matter how much they got to me and don't stop them from coming and to also challenge them just like you said. I personally think that accepting and challenging are the only way you can fully get over anxiety, be it thoughts or symptoms. You have to face anxiety head on rather than run away from it every time it comes up which is what most of us do, its only natural but in the long run running away from it only adds fuel to the fire and makes us fear our thoughts and sensations more.

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    (Original post by Nununu)
    Do you think challenging your beliefs has helped to stop other thoughts from coming?
    They don't stamp them out entirely but it helps you to try to live life regardless and also fit in things into your life that replace the opportunities the mind has to focus on the things that make you anxious... that's cbt. Exposing yourself to your fears without the help and support of a therapist might not be as helpful though tbh.
 
 
 
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