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    Hi

    I am currently a History student at a top 20 University. I am interested in a career in law or perhaps the civil service. I understand that I would need to complete the GDL and then the LPC to become a trainee solicitor.

    However, I have heard of some law graduates and non-law graduates taking an LLM and then going to do the GDL, LPC and then eventually finding themself in practice?

    I'm only asking out of interest, but I have a few questions... How feasible is this? I realise the LLM is a challenge anyway, but with hard work can this be achieved?

    Would the LLM work to your advantage if you later applied to law firms after doing the GDL and LPC? I imagine that an LLM in Tax Law or International Commerical Law would be useful in HMRC/Civil Service as well as in law firms?

    Thanks for your help!
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    I don't really see why you'd want to attempt a more specialised degree without having covered the basics. Attempting an LL.M. in international commercial law without having a proper grounding in contract law, and preferably things like company law and private international law, for instance, would seem to me... odd, really, as well as probably a lot less productive. The practical use of your LL.M. would be impacted by the fact that you wouldn't have proper context for the content you'd covered.

    If I were you I'd look into doing an accelerated undergraduate law degree. Alternatively, do the GDL first, then think about an LL.M.. Doing the GDL after an LL.M. would be perverse.

    (Original post by Ambulare)
    Would the LLM work to your advantage if you later applied to law firms after doing the GDL and LPC?
    You shouldn't be applying to law firms after doing the GDL or LPC anyway. Why you'd want to take the risk of self-funding through them when firms will pay for you to do it I don't know.
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    Many LLM programmes (maybe most I don't know for sure) require some prior subject knowledge and will require a degree with "significant law content" for example. The reason for that is because LLMs in the UK don't have introductory courses at the beginning. You often leap right into chosen specialist modules and then the thesis.

    For example, most of the LLM programmes in Public International Law I looked at a couple of years ago didn't have a module in Public International Law to get you started... it was expected that applicants have already done it at LLB level as a base.

    So! Do the GDL first and then if you want to specialise do an LLM later. LLMs are becoming increasingly important in making yourself stand out to enter practice so it is good you're open to the idea.
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    I think that an LLM is cool but CILEx is a better way forward I am a CILEx Lawyer through Harley Reed. It was so simple one I had my GDL.
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    Honestly, CILEx should be avoided. Only a year ago CILEx lawyers gained the right to work without supervision by solicitors. It will not be a career path that is encouraged by many law schools because it is kind of an unknown what is going to happen with CILEx. I did my mini-pupillages around the time CILEx lawyers had their rights increased and a few barristers were talking about it with me and said don't be a CILEx lawyer because they're paper jockeys and are harming the quality of legal representation. Just my two cents!
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    (Original post by alexgilder)
    Honestly, CILEx should be avoided. Only a year ago CILEx lawyers gained the right to work without supervision by solicitors. It will not be a career path that is encouraged by many law schools because it is kind of an unknown what is going to happen with CILEx. I did my mini-pupillages around the time CILEx lawyers had their rights increased and a few barristers were talking about it with me and said don't be a CILEx lawyer because they're paper jockeys and are harming the quality of legal representation. Just my two cents!
    What a load of cobblers, I do hope you're joking. CILEx was established over 50 years ago, its certainly not a new or "unknown" thing.
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    (Original post by Ambulare)
    Hi

    I am currently a History student at a top 20 University.
    If you want to do Law, make sure you get your 2:i. The GDL and LPC/BPTC are horrendously expensive.

    Both options are a gamble:
    1. You apply for TCs and are up against everyone who has qualifying Law Degrees and legal work experience, commercial experience and post graduates.

    2. You do the GDL and apply in line with the others

    3. You do the GDL, LPC, having done some work experience (if you haven't already) and apply the same as everyone else. But will be over £20,000 out of pocket.

    Pick the firms carefully. But do your degree first and get the grade.
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    (Original post by cilexlawyerdude)
    I think that an LLM is cool but CILEx is a better way forward I am a CILEx Lawyer through Harley Reed. It was so simple one I had my GDL.
    The OP is talking about doing the LPC, I presume, therefore, they wish to be an Officer of the Court, not a CILEx.
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    (Original post by alexgilder)
    Honestly, CILEx should be avoided. Only a year ago CILEx lawyers gained the right to work without supervision by solicitors. It will not be a career path that is encouraged by many law schools because it is kind of an unknown what is going to happen with CILEx. I did my mini-pupillages around the time CILEx lawyers had their rights increased and a few barristers were talking about it with me and said don't be a CILEx lawyer because they're paper jockeys and are harming the quality of legal representation. Just my two cents!
    Excellent point. CILEx aren't lawyers, and have a major complex about it. Waiting for the flaming to start on here.
 
 
 
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