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Sean's Ship to Success Watch

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    (Original post by spiritless98)
    WOW! good luck you can do this!


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    I hope so :ahee: thanks!

    (Original post by Tank Girl)
    YEAS SeanFM!

    Looking forward to this one. It's so hard to keep motivated at uni- the struggle is real!

    Good luck with everything
    The struggle is real. :hide: :lazy:

    Thank you :angelblush:
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    Good luck. You're the 2nd mathmo I know to have taken Japanese as an optional unit.
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    (Original post by Kvothe the arcane)
    Good luck. You're the 2nd mathmo I know to have taken Japanese as an optional unit.
    is the first someone else on this site?
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    is the first someone else on this site?
    Robbie242 though he's now banned .
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    Righto.. as I have a bit of free time at the moment, a bit of a pre-match interview.

    What's studying at university like?
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    As a lot of the users in GYG and TSR as a whole are A-level GCSE students, I thought I would talk a bit about what it's like to study at university.

    If you've watched Legally Blonde you might think 'ahh, I just have to read the footnotes carefully' or 'I have to give my opinions on things in class'. How accurate that is.. it depends on where you're studying, what you're studying and who you're being taught by!

    It's a bit of a step up from A-level. The big differences are:

    That there aren't as many nice/neat resources that you may have for A-levels, in that you might not be able to refer to just one textbook, but that you have to borrow a textbook from the library just to read 1 chapter of it!

    That you have lectures and 'tutorials' rather than classes and nothing else. It took me some time to get used to lectures - I used to write everything down despite the slids being uploaded onto a website that the uni uses. About halfway in the lectures I wasn't absorbing anything and just mindlessly writing down things . But now I print out lecture notes if they are provided beforehand and write down what I think are key bits of information, for me to look at after.

    Tutorials are a bit more like being taught by a teacher at A-level, though you're expected to know stuff and be able to contribute to the tutorials (don't worry if you can't - in most of my tutorials questions are met with silence a lot of the time!) but you get the most of these by doing the problem sheets (homework), having questions to ask about that week's lecture notes if you have any, and if you're at the top of your game, questions to ask about the next problem sheet.

    Aaand with your timetable, it's up to you to wake yourself up and go to lectures/tutorials/do work/manage your time. There's no one to give you detentions (though you could be disciplined if you don't turn up often to things that have attendance recorded)
    or to notice if you're missing from lectures, and it's up to you to catch up if you do. (Work can pile up very, very quickly!).

    It is difficult but if it's something you enjoy, hopefully you feel motivated enough to work for it and do well. Though you do get areas of your subject(s) that you don't like but.. can't have everything in life, eh?

    And you get a lot of independence. Possibly living away from your parents, cooking, cleaning, managing money, getting involved at uni, studying, and most importantly, having fun!


    What's your strategy for getting through this semester?
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    I call it 'one step forward, one step back'. This technique may or may not exist already, and may have a name.

    I am studying 5 units this year (+ Japanese, but as there are only 5 weekdays per week, this will fit in somewhere else).

    For each week not only will I be studying the things that go on during the week and attempting those problem sheets, but also, I will be studying things from the previous week.

    It won't be more than 1 hour per module, and I'll only do one module per day and not the same module twice in one week. I'll start off with a blank piece of paper and test myself on what's been covered during the previous week for that module, in a spider diagram fashion. Once I do that, I look at the notes for that week and fill in the gaps.

    After that, I'll look at the problem sheet that I'd completed the previous week and go through the questions, looking at comments left by tutors and then reattempt them. The idea is that you can look at anything and go 'ohh of course' and never look at it again, or try again and see if you've actually learned.

    Which day goes for which module will be decided by when my tutorials are and when it gets handed back to me. The idea is to have a routine as well, so every Monday I'll revise the same module as I did for the previous Monday.

    Hopefully this makes the last bit of revision over the easter break and just before exams a lot easier, as it'll be the third time I've looked at the material.



    What will the structure of the blog be?
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    I've decided to post here every Sunday, starting next week.

    I'll keep track of what I've done during the week and post a few stats:

    Lectures attended: ??/??
    Tutorials attended: ??/??
    Problem sheet scores:
    Analysis:
    Corporate finance for managers (if applicable):
    Introduction to Accounting (if applicable):
    Probability:
    Statistics:
    Number of hours of independent study:

    and then talk about, I don't know, something that I've found interesting, or how the techniques are going, or funny things that happen around me as I am studying, and maybe some images and vines to break it up a bit.

    What does your timetable look like?
    Spoiler:
    Show
    I've attached it below.

    As you can see, loads of gaps in the middle of the day! Not sure if I'll go home or camp in the library. It was the winter of disco tents last semester so I stayed in the library to study. (By that, I mean I had a much worse timetable than I do this semester, filled with 1 hour gaps between lectures, so I had no choice but to stay at the library.

    Wednesday looks like a day where I shouldn't bother going in, but I hope to go to 100% of my lectures/tutorials this semester and that's not going to stop me. :woo:

    Key dates in my GYG journey:
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    Monday 1st Feb:First day of second semester.

    Around the 28th of Feb: Results from first semester. :hide:

    Friday 18th March: Last day before Easter holidays. :woo:

    Monday 4th April: Back to uni

    Friday 27th May: Exams will have finished by this date. :woo:

    Attached Images
  1. File Type: pdf timetable_26-1-2016.pdf (2.8 KB, 86 views)
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    Good luck Sean! I'm sure you'll have no trouble meeting your targets

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    Wow so is that 300 people in your year at uni? That's a lot!

    Oh and good luck with your goals Do you know when you get your semester 1 exam results?
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    (Original post by rayquaza17)
    Wow so is that 300 people in your year at uni? That's a lot!

    Oh and good luck with your goals Do you know when you get your semester 1 exam results?
    Started off with around 360 maybe 300 of us now.

    Thanks :jumphug: the 27th of this month :hide: how about you?
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    All this time I assumed you were an A-level student. But we're in the same year (2nd year of uni) smfh :emo:

    This is fantastic Sean, will certainly use it as inspiration. You'll have no issue growing your already fantastic grades
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    Started off with around 360 maybe 300 of us now.

    Thanks :jumphug: the 27th of this month :hide: how about you?
    Around the 24th.

    So do you all fit in one lecture theatre? It's crazy because there's like at most 120 of us!
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    (Original post by rayquaza17)
    Around the 24th.

    So do you all fit in one lecture theatre? It's crazy because there's like at most 120 of us!
    Didn't you start exams after I had finished mine? I guess there's much less marking to be done.

    Yeah, but only in the biggest lecture theatres on campus whereas things like Biology or Accounting and Finance with 90 people use the smaller lecture theatres.
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    Wake me up when the semester ends

    Right, the end of week 1, semester 2, where are we at?

    Lectures attended: 7/9
    Tutorials attended: 1/2
    Number of hours of independent study: 3.
    No problem sheet results so far.

    So, a disappointing start to what was supposed to be a semester with 100% attendance. I'd overslept for one, got the time wrong for another and the bus just didn't arrive for the third occasion. None of those are excuses, just what happened, and for the next 10 weeks I am aiming for 100% attendance.

    There hasn't been that much to study so far - I read ahead for the first week but haven't done so for the second week, and all the time seems to have flown by. It isn't that long until results day! :eek4:

    Japanese class was interesting - some people from the previous semester weren't there, and some new faces were. We recapped on things from the first semester, were taught a few more kanji (taking us up to maybe 60) and about how to give our opinions on things (favourite seasons, holidays, sports etc).

    As it's week two next week, I'm going to start the technique of revising a module from the previous week by first testing my memory of it, then looking at the notes to fill in gaps, and then look at the problem sheet. The point isn't to have remembered everything, just giving myself a second time not too far from the original lecture to have a look and retain more information than I did the first time round.

    One poor lecturer, who has a lecture timetabled in what he admitted to be the worst possible timeslot (16:15 to 18:05), had people dismiss themselves by packing up as early as 7 minutes before the lecture was due to finish, and leaving as he played a video. I felt sorry for him, and I've decided to make this week's (hopefully) informative piece of writing on lectures and how to survive them, below.

    Next week is where it all starts for me - getting into the swing of problem sheets, going to all of my lecturers and starting off my revision technique. See ya.





    What are lectures like?
    Spoiler:
    Show
    :moon: I remember my first lecture as if it were one and a half years ago. Getting lost and asking the Students Union president for directions, and then waiting outside the lecture hall amidst 360 other Maths students. Whoever it was decided to walk into the lecture hall first did so, and the rest of us followed. I believe that it was the most well attended lecture to date. :moon:

    At the start of a lecture, people start to queue up outside the hall. Unless you come along with friends, the etiquette is to have one hand in your pocket or on your hips and browse your phone. If it's out of battery, pretend to do so anyway and hope that nobody sees you tapping away at a blank screen.

    Around 5 minutes before the lecturer, someone will elect to go in first and everyone else follows. The question is, where do you sit? For the first few lectures, people may actually sit next to eachother and talk, make friends, and form groups. After the first few lectures, none of that really happens and people sit in distinct groups. Also, people tend to sit in the same area, some even sit in the same row, as they usually do, apart from latecomers who take wherever there is a seat.

    After said seating plan and groups have been formed, in lectures that everyone knows that the lecture theatre won't be full, there is at least one empty seat left between different groups, sometimes more. I imagine an aerial view of the lecture theatre would make for an interesting game of Candy Crush.

    So the question is - do you sit at the front, the middle or the back? Personally, I go with the middle. Depending on the lecturer, if you sit at the front you might get called on to answer something, or your head might get tired from looking up at a board. At the back, you may not be able to see or hear so well, though there is the benefit of (usually) being closer to the door. The middle strikes a nice balance between those two things.

    Onto the actual lecture. If your lecturer doesn't provide notes or provides incomplete notes then you'd be wise to copy as much as you can down. If they do provide notes, the best thing to do is to write down key bits of information, things that will help you to understand the notes later. If you're frantically copying everything down, then chances are you aren't understanding it.

    People can raise their hand or shout out answers if they wish, or shout out to correct the lecturer. One person on my course, who seems to answer most of the questions, has been nicknamed 'answer man' which sounds quite cool. :holmes:

    The lecturer may decide to pass something around to hand out to people. This becomes awkward when the person you have to hand it to is either on another row or on the opposite end of a row and, mid lecture, you have to get up to hand it to them. :hide:

    I'm not sure about other people, but my attention seems to drift elsewhere about 30 or 40 minutes in. Looking at the clock is the worst thing that you can do - the linear nature of time seems to become less... linear, you suddenly find yourself thinking about the price of tea in China and the lecturer has moved on. There's also when you look away for a second because something seems easy or familiar and then this happens...:

    Spoiler:
    Show


    What's the point of lectures? Well, the lecturer may drop subtle hints about what's going to be important for the exam, they may be able to explain things to you, it's a chance for you to ask questions directly to them and/or get involved.

    Finally, the lecture comes to a close and you're done. But the work isn't over yet - you should read over the notes at some point after the lecture and attempt make sure that you've taken away the key ideas.

    Oh, and one last thing, go to lectures! Missing them is a slippery slope.

    So, here are the tips for Sean's declassified school survival on lectures:

    Sit with a group if you can, and don't sit too close to any other group.
    Sit in the middle.
    Take care in taking notes. Don't do too much or too little.
    Resist the temptation to go on your phone.
    Go to them!







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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    Wake me up when the semester ends

    Right, the end of week 1, semester 2, where are we at?

    Lectures attended: 7/9
    Tutorials attended: 1/2
    Number of hours of independent study: 3.
    No problem sheet results so far.

    So, a disappointing start to what was supposed to be a semester with 100% attendance. I'd overslept for one, got the time wrong for another and the bus just didn't arrive for the third occasion. None of those are excuses, just what happened, and for the next 10 weeks I am aiming for 100% attendance.

    There hasn't been that much to study so far - I read ahead for the first week but haven't done so for the second week, and all the time seems to have flown by. It isn't that long until results day! :eek4:

    Japanese class was interesting - some people from the previous semester weren't there, and some new faces were. We recapped on things from the first semester, were taught a few more kanji (taking us up to maybe 60) and about how to give our opinions on things (favourite seasons, holidays, sports etc).

    As it's week two next week, I'm going to start the technique of revising a module from the previous week by first testing my memory of it, then looking at the notes to fill in gaps, and then look at the problem sheet. The point isn't to have remembered everything, just giving myself a second time not too far from the original lecture to have a look and retain more information than I did the first time round.

    One poor lecturer, who has a lecture timetabled in what he admitted to be the worst possible timeslot (16:15 to 18:05), had people dismiss themselves by packing up as early as 7 minutes before the lecture was due to finish, and leaving as he played a video. I felt sorry for him, and I've decided to make this week's (hopefully) informative piece of writing on lectures and how to survive them, below.

    Next week is where it all starts for me - getting into the swing of problem sheets, going to all of my lecturers and starting off my revision technique. See ya.





    What are lectures like?
    Spoiler:
    Show
    :moon: I remember my first lecture as if it were one and a half years ago. Getting lost and asking the Students Union president for directions, and then waiting outside the lecture hall amidst 360 other Maths students. Whoever it was decided to walk into the lecture hall first did so, and the rest of us followed. I believe that it was the most well attended lecture to date. :moon:

    At the start of a lecture, people start to queue up outside the hall. Unless you come along with friends, the etiquette is to have one hand in your pocket or on your hips and browse your phone. If it's out of battery, pretend to do so anyway and hope that nobody sees you tapping away at a blank screen.

    Around 5 minutes before the lecturer, someone will elect to go in first and everyone else follows. The question is, where do you sit? For the first few lectures, people may actually sit next to eachother and talk, make friends, and form groups. After the first few lectures, none of that really happens and people sit in distinct groups. Also, people tend to sit in the same area, some even sit in the same row, as they usually do, apart from latecomers who take wherever there is a seat.

    After said seating plan and groups have been formed, in lectures that everyone knows that the lecture theatre won't be full, there is at least one empty seat left between different groups, sometimes more. I imagine an aerial view of the lecture theatre would make for an interesting game of Candy Crush.

    So the question is - do you sit at the front, the middle or the back? Personally, I go with the middle. Depending on the lecturer, if you sit at the front you might get called on to answer something, or your head might get tired from looking up at a board. At the back, you may not be able to see or hear so well, though there is the benefit of (usually) being closer to the door. The middle strikes a nice balance between those two things.

    Onto the actual lecture. If your lecturer doesn't provide notes or provides incomplete notes then you'd be wise to copy as much as you can down. If they do provide notes, the best thing to do is to write down key bits of information, things that will help you to understand the notes later. If you're frantically copying everything down, then chances are you aren't understanding it.

    People can raise their hand or shout out answers if they wish, or shout out to correct the lecturer. One person on my course, who seems to answer most of the questions, has been nicknamed 'answer man' which sounds quite cool. :holmes:

    The lecturer may decide to pass something around to hand out to people. This becomes awkward when the person you have to hand it to is either on another row or on the opposite end of a row and, mid lecture, you have to get up to hand it to them. :hide:

    I'm not sure about other people, but my attention seems to drift elsewhere about 30 or 40 minutes in. Looking at the clock is the worst thing that you can do - the linear nature of time seems to become less... linear, you suddenly find yourself thinking about the price of tea in China and the lecturer has moved on. There's also when you look away for a second because something seems easy or familiar and then this happens...:

    Spoiler:
    Show


    What's the point of lectures? Well, the lecturer may drop subtle hints about what's going to be important for the exam, they may be able to explain things to you, it's a chance for you to ask questions directly to them and/or get involved.

    Finally, the lecture comes to a close and you're done. But the work isn't over yet - you should read over the notes at some point after the lecture and attempt make sure that you've taken away the key ideas.

    Oh, and one last thing, go to lectures! Missing them is a slippery slope.

    So, here are the tips for Sean's declassified school survival on lectures:

    Sit with a group if you can, and don't sit too close to any other group.
    Sit in the middle.
    Take care in taking notes. Don't do too much or too little.
    Resist the temptation to go on your phone.
    Go to them!







    Classic- I'm going to attend all lectures. First week of semester- epic fail.

    Love reading about your stuff though-makes me feel so nostalgic for my time at Bath. p.s. if you head down to bio and biochem they all know me- I'm big time.
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    Guilty

    :yep: I'm sure they do, I'd probably be escorted off the premises if I asked about a nymph that studied Biology :ninjagirl:
    I'm never gonna lose the nymph tag am I? even though I'm now worldie!!!
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    (Original post by Ethereal World)
    I'm never gonna lose the nymph tag am I? even though I'm now worldie!!!
    :lol: sorry, that post seemed a bit silly even in context so off it goes you can be worldie from now on.
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    :lol: sorry, that post seemed a bit silly even in context so off it goes you can be worldie from now on.
    the post didn't offend me at all dw. ZuluK and Zarga and a few others are still calling me nymph. I find it funny. :rofl:
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    (Original post by Ethereal World)
    the post didn't offend me at all dw. ZuluK and Zarga and a few others are still calling me nymph. I find it funny. :rofl:
    what's a nymph? it sounds like a mystical creature.
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    what's a nymph? it sounds like a mystical creature.
    In Greek and Roman mythology, a nymph is a nature spirit in the guise of an attractive maiden. Inhabiting forests, fields, caves, mountains, lakes, the sea, nymphs often suffered the attentions of men, notably those of the gods; the free-spirited Daphne turned herself into a laurel tree to avoid Apollo's amorous advances.

    Today, "nymph" refers to a woman who has an insatiable sexual appetite (i.e., a woman who has the sexual drive of a man).

    From Urban dictionary.

    Essentially the first definition is what I was going for....but I think I have been mistaken for the "today" version
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    (Original post by Ethereal World)
    In Greek and Roman mythology, a nymph is a nature spirit in the guise of an attractive maiden. Inhabiting forests, fields, caves, mountains, lakes, the sea, nymphs often suffered the attentions of men, notably those of the gods; the free-spirited Daphne turned herself into a laurel tree to avoid Apollo's amorous advances.

    Today, "nymph" refers to a woman who has an insatiable sexual appetite (i.e., a woman who has the sexual drive of a man).

    From Urban dictionary.

    Essentially the first definition is what I was going for....but I think I have been mistaken for the "today" version
    Oooh...TSR is a lot less PG13 than I remembered. I think it's because I'm spending more time in chat...

    :eek:
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    Best of luck 😊😊 you will ace the exams. I still don't understand how some people are soooooo good at Maths- I can't calculate money whilst shopping
 
 
 
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