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    Are you sure you want to take 2 languages?
    I'm doing iGCSEs in French and Spanish and kind of regret it tbh.
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    I would be more inclined to disagree with your first point. An awful lot of words in German can easily be guessed by an English speaker with no knowledge of German as they are very similar or identical to the English equivalent.

    But English, then again, certainly has a very bold history of taking words from as many languages as possible.
    Perhaps I've been learning French for long enough that it feels more natural than it really is!

    But it seems to me that French, particularly at higher levels (which is slightly irrelevant given that this is question only in the scope of GCSEs), shares many of its words with English - or at least they're very close by comparison.

    I've randomly selected a paragraph from my upcoming speech for my A2 speaking exam. Even in just these sentences most non-French speakers would get the gist of what I'm saying, and this is supposed to be the complicated end of French.

    Really, once you know the basics of French (i.e. knowing that prendre = to take and an = year), it is easy to understand. Speaking is another matter.
    Spoiler:
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    Il est necessaire qu'on prenne plus des réfugiés syriens. En ce moment, le premier ministre de Grande Bretagne a promis de ne plus accepter un quota de 20,000 personnes syriens au cours des 5 ans.
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    (Original post by flippantri)
    Considering English has Germanic roots...
    True but we borrowed a lot from French, especially in middle English's formative years.

    (Degree in French and German)
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    (Original post by elen90)
    Perhaps I've been learning French for long enough that it feels more natural than it really is!

    But it seems to me that French, particularly at higher levels (which is slightly irrelevant given that this is question only in the scope of GCSEs), shares many of its words with English - or at least they're very close by comparison.

    I've randomly selected a paragraph from my upcoming speech for my A2 speaking exam. Even in just these sentences most non-French speakers would get the gist of what I'm saying, and this is supposed to be the complicated end of French.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Il est necessaire qu'on prenne plus des réfugiés syriens. En ce moment, le premier ministre de Grande Bretagne a promis de ne plus accepter un quota de 20,000 personnes syriens au cours des 5 ans.
    I agree that many languages share traits with English, but the reason in your example non-French speakers would get the gist is because it's a piece about a modern affair, which (in my experience in a few other languages known at only a basic language), is quite easy to do. I feel like a piece of poetry for example would be much harder to understand.
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    (Original post by SiaSiaSia)
    True but we borrowed a lot from French, especially in middle English's formative years.

    (Degree in French and German)
    I know, I wasn't questioning your knowledge, I was just saying, we also have a lot of Germanic roots, so it isn't fair to compare and say which one is easier.

    (Learning German since age 8)
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    (Original post by Student403)
    I agree that many languages share traits with English, but the reason in your example non-French speakers would get the gist is because it's a piece about a modern affair, which (in my experience in a few other languages known at only a basic language), is quite easy to do. I feel like a piece of poetry for example would be much harder to understand.
    I don't understand poetry when it's in English, let alone another language :afraid:
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    I would be more inclined to disagree with your first point. An awful lot of words in German can easily be guessed by an English speaker with no knowledge of German as they are very similar or identical to the English equivalent.

    But English, then again, certainly has a very bold history of taking words from as many languages as possible.
    1st point: I have a degree in German and I struggle to recognise words sometimes. I never have this problem in French
    2nd point: literally not just English at all. Many languages have strong histories of borrowing.
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Grammar can certainly be, pardon my French (:ahee:), a ***** in German. But there aren't too many exceptions and it's more a case of learning the many structures which don't actually change much.

    There's also the lovely aspect of being able to create your own compound words out of the known pre/suffixes, most of which will make sense combined.
    Yeah it's never really the exceptions* that are hard, it's just the most bizarre way (to an English speaker) of phrasing some sentences.

    And yes when you need to use a term but you don't know it so you try and shove 2 related words together and it works *hallelujah*

    *minus the goddamn PLURALS
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Yeah it's never really the exceptions* that are hard, it's just the most bizarre way (to an English speaker) of phrasing some sentences.

    And yes when you need to use a term but you don't know it so you try and shove 2 related words together and it works *hallelujah*

    *minus the goddamn PLURALS
    True the plurals are annoying
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    (Original post by elen90)
    Perhaps I've been learning French for long enough that it feels more natural than it really is!

    But it seems to me that French, particularly at higher levels (which is slightly irrelevant given that this is question only in the scope of GCSEs), shares many of its words with English - or at least they're very close by comparison.

    I've randomly selected a paragraph from my upcoming speech for my A2 speaking exam. Even in just these sentences most non-French speakers would get the gist of what I'm saying, and this is supposed to be the complicated end of French.

    Really, once you know the basics of French (i.e. knowing that prendre = to take and an = year), it is easy to understand. Speaking is another matter.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Il est necessaire qu'on prenne plus des réfugiés syriens. En ce moment, le premier ministre de Grande Bretagne a promis de ne plus accepter un quota de 20,000 personnes syriens au cours des 5 ans.
    I can understand some of that text and it's surprising how much is recognisable to an English speaker I assume it is simply the fact that once they are spoken, from there on in it seems more difficult for a non-French speaking person to understand?

    I tried to grab my own example and I do kinda relate to your first point... as I understand the words I'm struggling to now think "wait is this just easy because I know it, or would a non-speaker recognise too?"

    Here is an example I grabbed from an article just for reference (I would presume an English speaker could guess a fair amount)
    Spoiler:
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    Die „Grüne Woche“ in Berlin ist die größte Landwirtschaftsmesse der Welt und gilt Kritikern als Symbol für die zunehmende Industrialisierung der Landwirtschaft. Auch im Januar 2016 demonstrierten wieder zehntausende Menschen unter dem Motto „Wir haben es satt!“

    (Original post by SiaSiaSia)
    1st point: I have a degree in German and I struggle to recognise words sometimes. I never have this problem in French
    2nd point: literally not just English at all. Many languages have strong histories of borrowing.
    1: I guess this is just going to be an individual case-by-case basis then.
    2: I am aware, but I simply said it as English is still renowned and jokingly mocked for doing this sometimes.
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    (Original post by Student403)
    True the plurals are annoying
    The language would be better off without such a misfortune
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    German, I feel like it is much easier to learn.
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    (Original post by slothonist)
    Apparently German is easier than French
    Not in my experience- I can speak both to some extent. I have watched French language films without subtitles in France and understood them, but would have no chance with a German language film.
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    The language would be better off without such a misfortune
    True but then we'd have to ask for single servings of Berliners oder Frankfurter ;D
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    German is a lot easier in terms of pronounciation and understanding because of the near cognates whereas French is the opposite.
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    (Original post by Student403)
    True but then we'd have to ask for single servings of Berliners oder Frankfurter ;D
    Let's just shove numbers in front

    10 frankfurter bitte
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Let's just shove numbers in front

    10 frankfurter bitte
    Good thinking!

    REVOLUTION!
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Good thinking!

    REVOLUTION!
    Now time to sort out the random gendering of words
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Now time to sort out the random gendering of words
    Das Maedchen smh
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Das Maedchen smh
    Tbffffffffffffff to German at least that one suits the rule of diminuitive (chen/lein) always = das

    das Weib (woman) on the other hand =/
 
 
 
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