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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Tbffffffffffffff to German at least that one suits the rule of diminuitive (chen/lein) always = das

    das Weib (woman) on the other hand =/
    True >.> Why not "Die Maedchene" or something :C
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    (Original post by Student403)
    True >.> Why not "Die Maedchene" or something :C
    OR Die Girl

    much simpler ja? ;~)
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    OR Die Girl

    much simpler ja? ;~)
    I overthink things way too much :lol:

    I don't like the look of "Das baby" though.. Not German looking at all >.>
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    (Original post by Student403)
    I overthink things way too much :lol:

    I don't like the look of "Das baby" though.. Not German looking at all >.>
    I am quite often like that with any German word that looks English. If I see something like "das Computer", I'm like "no.. I want a GERMAN looking word!" (der Rechner is one but I'm uncertain how oft it is used).

    das Baby
    die Babys lmao

    I'm not sure how it's pronounced though - if the Y is pronounced like in English it's 99.99% probably going to be a loanword
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    Kid, I'm only gonna say this once only.
    Study French instead of German, French is spoken in many countries abroad, while German is only spoken in Germany, German is a dying language that will die like latin.
    French is the 4th largest language after Manderin, English, Spanish
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    I am quite often like that with any German word that looks English. If I see something like "das Computer", I'm like "no.. I want a GERMAN looking word!" (der Rechner is one but I'm uncertain how oft it is used).

    das Baby
    die Babys lmao

    I'm not sure how it's pronounced though - if the Y is pronounced like in English it's 99.99% probably going to be a loanword
    YES

    I tried extending the "a" to "bar-bee" and yeah that sounded stupid. I get you. Perhaps "Komputer" would be better. Definitely indiscreet with their "borrowing", those pesky linguists
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    (Original post by JD742)
    Kid, I'm only gonna say this once only.
    Study French instead of German, French is spoken in many countries abroad, while German is only spoken in Germany, German is a dying language that will die like latin.
    French is the 4th largest language after Manderin, English, Spanish
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    (Original post by Student403)
    YES

    I tried extending the "a" to "bar-bee" and yeah that sounded stupid. I get you. Perhaps "Komputer" would be better. Definitely indiscreet with their "borrowing", those pesky linguists
    Most of the borrowing I notice is always with technology, e.g. das(?) Scanner/das Computer/das Smartphone, which I guess is partially understandable. However I do wish they would pronounce it in a German way - it's irritating trying to figure out whether a loanword is said like the language it was borrowed from or in German.

    I honestly thought Jeans was Yeh-ah-ns until i found out it was just the same
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Most of the borrowing I notice is always with technology, e.g. das(?) Scanner/das Computer/das Smartphone, which I guess is partially understandable. However I do wish they would pronounce it in a German way - it's irritating trying to figure out whether a loanword is said like the language it was borrowed from or in German.

    I honestly thought Jeans was Yeh-ah-ns until i found out it was just the same
    Yeh-ah-ns :toofunny:

    That's brill
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    (Original post by Student403)
    YES

    I tried extending the "a" to "bar-bee" and yeah that sounded stupid. I get you. Perhaps "Komputer" would be better. Definitely indiscreet with their "borrowing", those pesky linguists
    I think you pronounce it like "beir-by", where the "beir" is like weird (not "wierd" but a long e sound)

    then again, I might be making all this up
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    (Original post by JD742)
    German is only spoken in Germany, German is a dying language that will die like latin.
    Germany
    Switzerland
    Luxembourg
    Austria
    Liechenstein

    off the top of my head. It's around 120+ million speakers ~ that is nowhere near a ''dying language''.

    And considering Germany's crusade to try and get as many immigrants into their country as possible I would imagine adding a couple of thousand more to that list.
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    (Original post by TSRian123454321)
    I think you pronounce it like "beir-by", where the "beir" is like weird (not "wierd" but a long e sound)

    then again, I might be making all this up
    Hmm that sounds better than the English "baby" and the Student403 stupid "barbie"
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Germany
    Switzerland
    Luxembourg
    Austria
    Liechenstein

    off the top of my head. It's around 120+ million speakers ~ that is nowhere near a ''dying language''.

    And considering Germany's crusade to try and get as many immigrants into their country as possible I would imagine adding a couple of thousand more to that list.
    can't forget Belgium (some do speak German, right?)
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Hmm that sounds better than the English "baby" and the Student403 stupid "barbie"
    :rofl: don't worry, I found your version very... interesting
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    DO FRENCH!!! So much easier and a lot more fun.
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    People don't realise that despite being a Germanic language, most of the vocabulary of modern English is French, Latin or Greek in origin.

    While English is Germanic, it has acquired much of its vocabulary from other sources, notably Latin and French.As Watkins explains: “Although English is a member of the Germanic branch of Indo-European and retains much of the basic structure of its origin, it has an exceptionally mixed lexicon. During the 1400 years of its documented history, it has borrowed extensively and systematically from its Germanic and Romance neighbors and from Latin and Greek, as well as more sporadically from other languages".

    Where exactly does our modern vocabulary come from? The website AskOxford cites a computerized analysis of the roughly 80,000 words in the old third edition of the Shorter Oxford Dictionary.The study, published in 1973, offered this breakdown of sources: Latin, 28.34 percent; French, 28.3 percent (that's 56%!); Old and Middle English, Old Norse, and Dutch, 25 percent; Greek 5.32 percent; no etymology given, 4.03 percent; derived from proper names, 3.28 percent; all other languages, less than 1 percent.

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    (Original post by TSRian123454321)
    can't forget Belgium (some do speak German, right?)
    Woops yes, that's the other major one.

    I'm sure I've read there are parts of Italy and the Netherlands which do have German speaking communities, but not that major I imagine.
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    Personally I would say stick with French. I did both French and Spanish at GCSE, which I found extremely similar and consequently complementary. During my controlled assessments I would often combine similar structures and ideologies due to their resemblance. Even in exams I noticed that certain French words were similar to Spanish words so I was able to determine their meanings, making the exam process so much more easier! Similarly I think that French is much more widely used nowadays (although I may be wrong) because it is used as a one of the universal languages in United Nations conferences and governments often communicate through the medium of French. Therefore qualifications in French are extremely useful! Although French structures are sometimes complex and I believe that due to your previous experience with the language it would more than likely be much easier than taking up German.

    However at the end of the day it's completely your choice! I'm currently doing Spanish A level and I love it so much! If you ever need any help with French or Spanish (whatever you decide to do) please feel free to PM me! I will be happy to help
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Germany
    Switzerland
    Luxembourg
    Austria
    Liechenstein

    off the top of my head. It's around 120+ million speakers ~ that is nowhere near a ''dying language''.

    And considering Germany's crusade to try and get as many immigrants into their country as possible I would imagine adding a couple of thousand more to that list.
    If you want to get all political so be it....
    FACT the German population is dying out as German ppl are having very few children.

    Fair enough about the 120 million speakers but 3x more people speak French across the whole world. Whilst German is only confined to Europe and the countries it surrounds.

    Another thing is that countries you listed above have a common history with Germany.
    Anyone remember the Holy Roman Empire (*cough, cough*) well those countries above were apart of it, research it if you don't believe. Thats why they share a common language.
    Until you can convience me otherwise that German is not a dying language, I will stand by my point.
    German hasn't spread to other countries outside Europe unlike French, Spanish, English and Arabic.
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    (Original post by JD742)
    If you want to get all political so be it....
    FACT the German population is dying out as German ppl are having very few children.

    Fair enough about the 120 million speakers but 3x more people speak French across the whole world. Whilst German is only confined to Europe and the countries it surrounds.

    Another thing is that countries you listed above have a common history with Germany.
    Anyone remember the Holy Roman Empire (*cough, cough*) well those countries above were apart of it, research it if you don't believe. Thats why they share a common language.
    Until you can convience me otherwise that German is not a dying language, I will stand by my point.
    German hasn't spread to other countries outside Europe unlike French, Spanish, English and Arabic.
    Because a language is mainly spoken in one continent it does not mean it is a ''dying language'' ??? I am aware that the likes of French and Spanish are spoken in multiple continents in greater amounts than German, but that doesn't mean German is ''dying''.

    As long as the population of all above countries keeps increasing, the language is not dying at all. Even if it were to decrease, it would take hundreds and hundreds of years to get rid of 120+million speakers.
 
 
 
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