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Edexcel A2 C4 Mathematics June 2016 - Official Thread Watch

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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    You could get an A with one-two days of fairly intense revision. You have ample time
    Damn, 2 days? I'm not that clever lol. How do you recommend going about revision for this? I usually go over examsolutions' syllabus and then do practice papers and it takes me 1-2 weeks even with intense revision. Then again I do have whole chapters (vectors) to go over


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    (Original post by кяя)
    Damn, 2 days? I'm not that clever lol. How do you recommend going about revision for this? I usually go over examsolutions' syllabus and then do practice papers and it takes me 1-2 weeks even with intense revision. Then again I do have whole chapters (vectors) to go over


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    Generally I would mainly go through the textbook, paying less attention to the basic stuff (e.g. partial fractions). Exam solutions is excellent, but he can be a bit slow sometimes, which isn't good when you have time constraints obviously. One thing I did but I'm not sure how optimal it is is go through some past papers even without having first revised to gauge how much I know, as, considering you must have learnt the modules/covered them before, you will naturally have some knowledge and understanding.
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    Generally I would mainly go through the textbook, paying less attention to the basic stuff (e.g. partial fractions). Exam solutions is excellent, but he can be a bit slow sometimes, which isn't good when you have time constraints obviously. One thing I did but I'm not sure how optimal it is is go through some past papers even without having first revised to gauge how much I know, as, considering you must have learnt the modules/covered them before, you will naturally have some knowledge and understanding.
    You seem to be the go to person for advice so just wondered if you could give some advice.

    Ive been prepped for core 3 and 4 since march so im fully prepared. But for some inexplicable reason i have issues when doing past papers, i will always make really silly errors, such as multiplying out of brackets in vectors and forgetting a minus, or forgetting to square or cube the bottom of a bracket in binomial expansion.

    So do you have any tips as far as performing rather than prepping for an exam?

    After getting 55ums on stats last year (1 day to revise that was my fault) i pretty much need 95ums in both core 3 &4 to get 480ums. I am capable of it so its not like im just naively hoping to pull out an a* when ive been getting C's all year. I just need to eliminate dumb errors.

    My current method is to smash though papers as fast as possible, leaving me enough time to thoughroughly check?

    Thanks for all the contributions to the maths threads by the way
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    (Original post by philo-jitsu)
    You seem to be the go to person for advice so just wondered if you could give some advice.

    Ive been prepped for core 3 and 4 since march so im fully prepared. But for some inexplicable reason i have issues when doing past papers, i will always make really silly errors, such as multiplying out of brackets in vectors and forgetting a minus, or forgetting to square or cube the bottom of a bracket in binomial expansion.

    So do you have any tips as far as performing rather than prepping for an exam?

    After getting 55ums on stats last year (1 day to revise that was my fault) i pretty much need 95ums in both core 3 &4 to get 480ums. I am capable of it so its not like im just naively hoping to pull out an a* when ive been getting C's all year. I just need to eliminate dumb errors.

    My current method is to smash though papers as fast as possible, leaving me enough time to thoughroughly check?

    Thanks for all the contributions to the maths threads by the way
    There are many someone can go to, I just may respond relatively quickly as I spend far, far too much time on here.

    Well the thing is smashing through papers as fast as possible could be contributing to the issue. It is good to have lots of time at the end of the exam to check, but personally I always finished a lot later than many people claim to because during each question and straight after doing each question I would be constantly scrutinizing every single step, thinking "does what I'm doing make sense", looking for algebraic mistakes, rereading the question. It's about whatever works for you but the problem with that method of rushing through is when you come back to a question after finishing the paper, you have to readjust your mental state to an extent, you're not "with the question" so to speak, whereas you were of course very engaged with it when first doing it. Checking after finishing is a very good thing if you have the time, but I recommend checking as you go more. Personally I've found that if I do this the number of mistakes I pick up on when rechecking at the end is nearly always 0.
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    There are many someone can go to, I just may respond relatively quickly as I spend far, far too much time on here.

    Well the thing is smashing through papers as fast as possible could be contributing to the issue. It is good to have lots of time at the end of the exam to check, but personally I always finished a lot later than many people claim to because during each question and straight after doing each question I would be constantly scrutinizing every single step, thinking "does what I'm doing make sense", looking for algebraic mistakes, rereading the question. It's about whatever works for you but the problem with that method of rushing through is when you come back to a question after finishing the paper, you have to readjust your mental state to an extent, you're not "with the question" so to speak, whereas you were of course very engaged with it when first doing it. Checking after finishing is a very good thing if you have the time, but I recommend checking as you go more. Personally I've found that if I do this the number of mistakes I pick up on when rechecking at the end is nearly always 0.
    Ah okay, thanks for the quick response!

    I usually dont like checking as im doing a question as i find myself second guessing then i lose where i am in a question then miss something, i suppose i could go straight through a question fully and then dohble check everything after just doing that question, that way its still fresh but im also not second guessing obvious steps, cheers for this
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    Generally I would mainly go through the textbook, paying less attention to the basic stuff (e.g. partial fractions). Exam solutions is excellent, but he can be a bit slow sometimes, which isn't good when you have time constraints obviously. One thing I did but I'm not sure how optimal it is is go through some past papers even without having first revised to gauge how much I know, as, considering you must have learnt the modules/covered them before, you will naturally have some knowledge and understanding.
    Isn't going through past papers a bit pointless if you're not ready? For example when I started C3 revision I got Ds and Es on past papers, but a week or two of revision I had As.

    Also the textbook idea is good but what about longggg chapters like vectors? I need a sort of summary or crash course...
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    (Original post by кяя)
    Isn't going through past papers a bit pointless if you're not ready? For example when I started C3 revision I got Ds and Es on past papers, but a week or two of revision I had As.

    Also the textbook idea is good but what about longggg chapters like vectors? I need a sort of summary or crash course...
    I suppose so. It depends on where you are. I suppose usually I have found myself when starting revision to have a reasonable grasp of most material. If you feel you have little grasp due to forgetting it by now or any other reason then yes past papers will be a bit pointless initially.

    The vectors chapter is relatively long yes but you don't need to focus on every little detail. Certainly in general you can ignore a lot of the exercises (especially earlier ones) in a chapter and it shouldn't take you forever to cover them doing that.
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    I suppose so. It depends on where you are. I suppose usually I have found myself when starting revision to have a reasonable grasp of most material. If you feel you have little grasp due to forgetting it by now or any other reason then yes past papers will be a bit pointless initially.

    The vectors chapter is relatively long yes but you don't need to focus on every little detail. Certainly in general you can ignore a lot of the exercises (especially earlier ones) in a chapter and it shouldn't take you forever to cover them doing that.
    Thanks for your quick replies!
    What would you suggest for an effective revision schedule? I have C3, C4 and S2 but C3 is done I just need practice papers now. I was thinking:

    1. Textbook/Exam Solutions
    2. Past papers
    3. Solomon Papers
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    Well the thing is smashing through papers as fast as possible could be contributing to the issue. It is good to have lots of time at the end of the exam to check, but personally I always finished a lot later than many people claim to because during each question and straight after doing each question I would be constantly scrutinizing every single step, thinking "does what I'm doing make sense", looking for algebraic mistakes, rereading the question. It's about whatever works for you but the problem with that method of rushing through is when you come back to a question after finishing the paper, you have to readjust your mental state to an extent, you're not "with the question" so to speak, whereas you were of course very engaged with it when first doing it. Checking after finishing is a very good thing if you have the time, but I recommend checking as you go more. Personally I've found that if I do this the number of mistakes I pick up on when rechecking at the end is nearly always 0.
    Do you think this is a good approach for FP3 as well, considering how tough timing is on that module?
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    (Original post by Ayman!)
    Do you think this is a good approach for FP3 as well, considering how tough timing is on that module?
    Probably not, considering I ran out of time in FP3.
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    (Original post by кяя)
    Thanks for your quick replies!
    What would you suggest for an effective revision schedule? I have C3, C4 and S2 but C3 is done I just need practice papers now. I was thinking:

    1. Textbook/Exam Solutions
    2. Past papers
    3. Solomon Papers
    Solomon papers can sometimes be useful but especially at this somewhat late stage I think they are a waste of time. Otherwise that strategy ought to be effective. I would recommend not being too religious about watching everything on exam solutions, at least skipping parts of videos as he can be a bit slow.
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    Probably not, considering I ran out of time in FP3.
    95 UMS after running out of time? :lol:
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    (Original post by Ayman!)
    95 UMS after running out of time? :lol:
    62/75 raw marks..not exactly the standard I would like, even if many others apparently messed up yielding such boundaries.
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    Pretty cute question.
    nice adjective
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    = -1/(13/5) = -5/13
    edit: Ah I see you noted it, nvm
    how do u solve it
    am curious
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    (Original post by Pablo Picasso)
    how do u solve it
    am curious
    use difference of two squares and relationship between sec^2 and tan^2
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    use difference of two squares and relationship between sec^2 and tan^2
    can you pls guide me more
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    (Original post by Pablo Picasso)
    can you pls guide me more
    (secx - tanx)(secx + tanx) = 1
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    (secx - tanx)(secx + tanx) = 1
    s hi t
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    (secx - tanx)(secx + tanx) = 1
    Could you not just sub the value of sec X you were given into secx+tan=-0.2


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