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    i am really struggling with AS literature I am doing the ocr exam board closed text exam. I am studying the books great Gatsby streetcar named desire and tempest and poems by Christina rosseti. in my latest mock I got a U. im struggling structuring my essays and what to include in them when answering the question. so I was just wondering if anyone could help by sources, videos or links which will help improve my grade as it is a big step from gcse.also revision tips and revising techniques will be useful.
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    Hey there! I also do English literature but not OCR, so I might not be much help, but I am studying A Streetcar Named Desire. Have you got a copy of York Notes for the play? It is a revision book that I personally find really useful, that provides scene summaries and points on key themes. I would recommend it. sorry for the limited help, good luck!
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    i'm doing AS English Literature with OCR too but I'm doing The Merchant's Tale, The History Boys, The Bloody Chamber & Other Stories and The Tempest. I got a D which was good as I exceeded expectations and was close to a C. My teachers tell me to revise quotes from a whole range, i.e different scenes and situations and always remember more quotes than needed.

    First briefly explain the point, then provide the evidence and always analyse. There are some great essays available and York Notes, like a previous poster mentioned is amazing.
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    (Original post by Lit34)
    Hey there! I also do English literature but not OCR, so I might not be much help, but I am studying A Streetcar Named Desire. Have you got a copy of York Notes for the play? It is a revision book that I personally find really useful, that provides scene summaries and points on key themes. I would recommend it. sorry for the limited help, good luck!
    yes I doo but don't find it much helpful writing essay and planning it
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    Hey can anyone tell me what AS lit is like? Do you have to read like 5 chapters per week? How many books do we have to read per term and for AS? Sorry I can't offer any help but I don't want to regret taking this a level.
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    [QUOTE=geniequeen48;62285099]Hey can anyone tell me what AS lit is like? Do you have to read like 5 chapters per week? How many books do we have to read per term and for AS? Sorry I can't offer any help but I don't want to regret taking this a level.[/QUOT
    all depends on what exam board you do really? for ocr we do one novel and two plays and various poems.
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    (Original post by geniequeen48)
    Hey can anyone tell me what AS lit is like? Do you have to read like 5 chapters per week? How many books do we have to read per term and for AS? Sorry I can't offer any help but I don't want to regret taking this a level.
    Well, make sure you enjoy reading, otherwise this may not be the one for you. I do enjoy it though, and it was one I didn't expect to if i'm honest. I was set what books I had to read in the summer, and one was a really novel, but I enjoyed it so it wasn't too bad. I was told to read 4 books, but am only studying 2 and a play. But just to let you know, we don't read the book together in class, that's what you have to do independently. If we hadn't read the novels over the summer, we got given a week or so to read a few chapters and make notes, whilst jotting down key quotes. It is usually the analysis that we go over in class We have never been set a few chapters for one night though. I would recommend it!
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    (Original post by boss121)
    yes I doo but don't find it much helpful writing essay and planning it
    I find it helpful to plan each of the possible themes in the novel/play by forming a quotation bank, and linking themes to context.
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    (Original post by Lit34)
    I find it helpful to plan each of the possible themes in the novel/play by forming a quotation bank, and linking themes to context.
    what do you mean by quotation bank could you please explain
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    [QUOTE=boss121;62285763]what do you mean by quotation bank could you please explain[/QUOTE
    Sure. As I go through the novel I note down key quotations that I could analyse. Then, I categorise them into themes so for example, I would put quotes for desire together in Streetcar. This means when I go to write an essay on the theme desire, I will have all my quotes ready so I know what I will write about.
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    I did AS OCR English Literature last year and, while I think because of the changes to A Levels your exam may be structured differently to how mine was, I can't see why you can't use the same revision methods I used.

    While reading through the texts (if you haven't done so already definitely reread the texts multiple times if you can) I highlighted key quotations and then wrote them down on a separate piece of paper (a quote bank). Rather than just listing them however I categorised them by theme. I did this for every text separately, using internet resources and revision guides to add more and then I highlighted quotes that allowed me to compare the texts (if your exam is not comparitive then this is not required).

    I did the same thing for critics quotes too (if you are being marked on A03: other interpretations this is increadibl useful and we were told having specific critics quotes would get us more marks than simply saying "a marxist interpretation")

    I then spent as much time as I could trying to learn these quotes, doing my best to remember which theme or area of the text they referred to (as well as who wrote them for critics quotes).

    To help with essay structuring try and look at one of the exemplar essays (I think there should be some on the OCR website) and highlight where that person has included each of AOs and try to do the same in your own writing. The most vital thing other than this is constant essay writing practice! Write as many essays as you can and get them marked by your teacher as often as possible This way you should get used to structuring the essay and get some idea of where you need to improve.

    Hope that helps and good luck!
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    (Original post by JStimo)
    I did AS OCR English Literature last year and, while I think because of the changes to A Levels your exam may be structured differently to how mine was, I can't see why you can't use the same revision methods I used.

    While reading through the texts (if you haven't done so already definitely reread the texts multiple times if you can) I highlighted key quotations and then wrote them down on a separate piece of paper (a quote bank). Rather than just listing them however I categorised them by theme. I did this for every text separately, using internet resources and revision guides to add more and then I highlighted quotes that allowed me to compare the texts (if your exam is not comparitive then this is not required).

    I did the same thing for critics quotes too (if you are being marked on A03: other interpretations this is increadibl useful and we were told having specific critics quotes would get us more marks than simply saying "a marxist interpretation"

    I then spent as much time as I could trying to learn these quotes, doing my best to remember which theme or area of the text they referred to (as well as who wrote them for critics quotes).

    To help with essay structuring try and look at one of the exemplar essays (I think there should be some on the OCR website) and highlight where that person has included each of AOs and try to do the same in your own writing. The most vital thing other than this is constant essay writing practice! Write as many essays as you can and get them marked by your teacher as often as possible This way you should get used to structuring the essay and get some idea of where you need to improve.

    Hope that helps and good luck!
    thanks a lot this really helped
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    (Original post by Lit34)
    Well, make sure you enjoy reading, otherwise this may not be the one for you. I do enjoy it though, and it was one I didn't expect to if i'm honest. I was set what books I had to read in the summer, and one was a really novel, but I enjoyed it so it wasn't too bad. I was told to read 4 books, but am only studying 2 and a play. But just to let you know, we don't read the book together in class, that's what you have to do independently. If we hadn't read the novels over the summer, we got given a week or so to read a few chapters and make notes, whilst jotting down key quotes. It is usually the analysis that we go over in class We have never been set a few chapters for one night though. I would recommend it!
    How many pages on average are the books? How many pages was the novel you read in the summer? What exactly have you read? (Sorry for the questions again)
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    (Original post by geniequeen48)
    How many pages on average are the books? How many pages was the novel you read in the summer? What exactly have you read? (Sorry for the questions again)
    Aha, no worries! For my course we study two novels with a common theme. One theme was science and modernity which I'm not actually studying but didn't know that til September when I started the course, and so had to read Frankenstein and the hand maids tale. The theme that I am doing now is the supernatural, and I am currently studying Dracula which is 395 pages long and then Dorain gray which is shorter with around 208 pages. All of which I read over the summer.
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    (Original post by Lit34)
    Aha, no worries! For my course we study two novels with a common theme. One theme was science and modernity which I'm not actually studying but didn't know that til September when I started the course, and so had to read Frankenstein and the hand maids tale. The theme that I am doing now is the supernatural, and I am currently studying Dracula which is 395 pages long and then Dorain gray which is shorter with around 208 pages. All of which I read over the summer.
    Wow that doesnt sound bad at all! And I do want to read those books especially haha! Which exam board are you doing? (I really hope I'd be doing the same thing) I thought it was books like Little Women.
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    (Original post by geniequeen48)
    Wow that doesnt sound bad at all! And I do want to read those books especially haha! Which exam board are you doing? (I really hope I'd be doing the same thing) I thought it was books like Little Women.
    Well I guess it all depends on the exam board or theme you get. Yeah I really like Dracula and I find it interesting to learn the links between the book and Victorian society, as the book was written during the Victorian period. I'm doing edexcel I think.
 
 
 
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