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    Hi everyone, I'm a first year med student, and I'm looking at intercalating at some point during my degree. I have a few questions, if anyone is able to answer them

    Does it make any difference in points (FY1 application) if the intercalation is bsc or masters?
    I'm interested in a career in surgery, could my choice of intercalation influence my portfolio later on (as in, would certain subjects look better)?

    Also, I'm going to just list a few of my interests, so if anyone has done an intercalation that they think I might like, I'd love to hear about it:
    neuroscience, clinical anatomy, psychology, memory, language acquisition

    Thanks!x
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    (Original post by Ezme39)
    Hi everyone, I'm a first year med student, and I'm looking at intercalating at some point during my degree. I have a few questions, if anyone is able to answer them

    Does it make any difference in points (FY1 application) if the intercalation is bsc or masters?
    I'm interested in a career in surgery, could my choice of intercalation influence my portfolio later on (as in, would certain subjects look better)?

    Also, I'm going to just list a few of my interests, so if anyone has done an intercalation that they think I might like, I'd love to hear about it:
    neuroscience, clinical anatomy, psychology, memory, language acquisition

    Thanks!x
    1) You will get the same amount of points for FPAS if you get a 1st in a Bsc however if you were to get a 2:1 you'd get one point less, two points less for a 2:2, and 3 points less for a 3rd.

    2) You will get points for your intercalation when applying for specialist training but i don't believe that discipline is a particularly important factor. If by that time you have a specialty in mind, tailor it towards that, otherwise do something you will enjoy.

    The most important thing to consider is maximising your opportunities when intercalating. If you can, get in with a supervisor who publishes a lot and has a high turnover of projects. That way whilst completing your main project you can also take on side projects (review articles, case series, book chapters) which will matter a whole lot more when applying to ST1/3 than whether your degree is in anatomy vs neuroscience.
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    (Original post by plrodham1)
    The most important thing to consider is maximising your opportunities when intercalating. If you can, get in with a supervisor who publishes a lot and has a high turnover of projects. That way whilst completing your main project you can also take on side projects (review articles, case series, book chapters) which will matter a whole lot more when applying to ST1/3 than whether your degree is in anatomy vs neuroscience.
    I think it's also important to not go into an intercalation with the mindset of expecting or feeling like you have to get published. Even though nearly half of my year intercalated in a BSc, only a small proportion ever did presentations and even fewer got actual publications from their year.

    The thing about intercalating in a MSc is that you cannot think of a MSc as a year 'out' but rather MSc courses are a year to build on an already expected high knowledge of a topic, developing it even further into a specialist area. The amount of work which you will have to do, in my opinion, would only be worth it if you knew that it was an area you really think you might pursue. Since you are only in first year it's probably highly unlikely that your choice now will stay the same throughout medical school so I would suggest not getting to caught up on intercalation choices just yet [especially since intercalating in a MSc would usually require you having completed 3 or 4 years at medical school].
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    (Original post by plrodham1)
    1)
    The most important thing to consider is maximising your opportunities when intercalating. If you can, get in with a supervisor who publishes a lot and has a high turnover of projects. That way whilst completing your main project you can also take on side projects (review articles, case series, book chapters) which will matter a whole lot more when applying to ST1/3 than whether your degree is in anatomy vs neuroscience.
    (Original post by spacepirate-James)
    I think it's also important to not go into an intercalation with the mindset of expecting or feeling like you have to get published. Even though nearly half of my year intercalated in a BSc, only a small proportion ever did presentations and even fewer got actual publications from their year.

    The thing about intercalating in a MSc is that you cannot think of a MSc as a year 'out' but rather MSc courses are a year to build on an already expected high knowledge of a topic, developing it even further into a specialist area. The amount of work which you will have to do, in my opinion, would only be worth it if you knew that it was an area you really think you might pursue.
    Thank you both this is really helpful! Part of the reason I'm starting to think about it so early is because (for my med school at least) a bsc is offered after year two- so this would influence whether I waited an extra year to do a masters. Although, based on what you have both said, it's only really worth doing that if I am especially passionate about the area.

    I hadn't even considered looking at the turnover of projects, so thanks for the advice! (even if it's not very common)
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    (Original post by spacepirate-James)
    I think it's also important to not go into an intercalation with the mindset of expecting or feeling like you have to get published. Even though nearly half of my year intercalated in a BSc, only a small proportion ever did presentations and even fewer got actual publications from their year.

    The thing about intercalating in a MSc is that you cannot think of a MSc as a year 'out' but rather MSc courses are a year to build on an already expected high knowledge of a topic, developing it even further into a specialist area. The amount of work which you will have to do, in my opinion, would only be worth it if you knew that it was an area you really think you might pursue. Since you are only in first year it's probably highly unlikely that your choice now will stay the same throughout medical school so I would suggest not getting to caught up on intercalation choices just yet [especially since intercalating in a MSc would usually require you having completed 3 or 4 years at medical school].
    It would be wise not to make it your absolute focus (of course your main project comes first) but i think a year is a lot of time to spend out of programme to only get one output from. Original research would be difficult to publish in that time frame but it's not unreasonable to expect to publish a review or two/conduct a case series to present somewhere.

    This will also depend on the OPs end goals, publications will be beneficial but are in no way a requirement for getting onto CST, however if the OP decides to try and go down the academic career route they're pretty much mandatory.
 
 
 
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