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    So I'm in year 11 At the moment about to do my GCSEs. My main aim is to become a doctor and for that you need to do a Medicine degree.So in my mocks, which were in November I gotEnglish - C
    Maths - C
    Core Science - B
    Additional science- C (we only did B4 C4 P4 exams, not the 5 and 6's)
    RS - C
    History - C
    Business studies - C
    Leisure and tourism - B

    So as you know, to get into medicine you have to have at least 7 GCSEs, A grade, and for A levels you need to have AAA (including Biology and Chemistry as an A level)I would really like to do medicine But I'm not sure if I will be able to reach All A's, or if I'm even capable enough for that. So my questions are
    1) would i really be able to achieveall A's
    2) are GCSE's really as hard as teachers and people make them out as3) how hard would you rate my GCSE subjects (Easy, Medium, Hard)
    4) how hard is Chemistry as an A level5) how hard is Biology as an A level 6)how hard is pschology as an A level7)how hard is English Language as an A level (Some other notes: we have recently done a maths mock, just at the start of January and I got a B in that, I also have done a history GCSE question which I got an A* in, English literature I have got a B in a controlled assessment we have done just a while back, I got a B in my recent RE test, I was 1 mark off an A arghhh!!!!!)
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    Hello,

    If you put the effort in- start revising now, little and often (yet don't forget to party and relaxxx), you'll get the A's at GCSE- I see you've already improved in a few months since the last set of mocks, if you keep this up steadily, you'll gain consistent GCSEs. The key is to prevent stressing at the last moment, it's possible: use CGP/available revision guides from your library for science to get a brief idea perhaps before your lesson- then you can use the teacher and the classroom environment to consolidate and answer any additional questions you might have about the topic, creating an efficient learning style- always always ask if you're unsure. Note that the teachers often want the best for you, but when I did my GCSEs their approach came off very pressurising - yes they can be difficult (frequency of GCSEs and their timing- at the same time deciding on A-levels etc can exacerbate this difficulty), but they need to be put into perspective, do it one step at a time.

    Although grades are often essential, don't become too preoccupied with them, this won't benefit your education- learn and become fascinated by your subjects that you want to pursue in the future, focussing on grades, disengages you from this- the As will come with hard work and an intrigue for the subject- you could even, when you find time (last year I found I was so busy all them time with exams and coursework but), extend your learning- perhaps in your long Summer Holiday of 2016, read some journals and articles, watch some TED talks on YouTube about Medicine, Universities relish in seeing a candidate go above and beyond the curriculum, yet you don't have to be concerned with this yet- just put it in your diary for summer! This summer, after your exams, also start looking at Work Experience for Medicine- this is vital, also join some societies in college, but that's too far in the future yet, think about GCSEs first!

    I couldn't possibly rate your GCSEs on difficulty- people find different aspects and basics of things in some subjects far more difficult than others do. I gained, and I was very surprised, 11 As and A*s at GCSE- I thought I failed them all because my stress and worry about doing well clouded any ability that I could've had. I do Biology and English and I know many who take Psychology and Chemistry A-level, here's the thing, all A-levels go up a notch- if they were the same level of GCSE then there would be no progression, the elements I find hardest in Biology is the style of exam compared to GCSE (questions are less memory based, more applying your skill, so say you learnt about photosynthesis and the function chloroplasts etc, the question may ask something in relation to this but not something that you've learnt necessarily out of a textbook- there is more thinking) and the vast detail of knowledge- as long as you keep organised, talk to teachers, use the learning resources of YouTube, Revision Guides, Teachers and the Internet websites like S-Cool, begin revision bit by bit, it'll be okay- there is no need to be concerned about A-level difficulty, if you're going to do them, just delve in and face it- everyone else with you is in the same boat and not everyone gets A********s first time, even the really clever guys.

    Good Luck with your GCSEs, do little bits and bobs here and there and don't panic- it should be challenging if you want these higher grades as Medicine is very competitive, but you have the same chance as everyone else, don't worry, just go for it. Also get the "easier" exams in the bag, many think RS is pointless, but I got an A* in this and it still serves as a good impression.

    Cheerio.
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    (Original post by notimeforthis)
    Hello,

    If you put the effort in- start revising now, little and often (yet don't forget to party and relaxxx), you'll get the A's at GCSE- I see you've already improved in a few months since the last set of mocks, if you keep this up steadily, you'll gain consistent GCSEs. The key is to prevent stressing at the last moment, it's possible: use CGP/available revision guides from your library for science to get a brief idea perhaps before your lesson- then you can use the teacher and the classroom environment to consolidate and answer any additional questions you might have about the topic, creating an efficient learning style- always always ask if you're unsure. Note that the teachers often want the best for you, but when I did my GCSEs their approach came off very pressurising - yes they can be difficult (frequency of GCSEs and their timing- at the same time deciding on A-levels etc can exacerbate this difficulty), but they need to be put into perspective, do it one step at a time.

    Although grades are often essential, don't become too preoccupied with them, this won't benefit your education- learn and become fascinated by your subjects that you want to pursue in the future, focussing on grades, disengages you from this- the As will come with hard work and an intrigue for the subject- you could even, when you find time (last year I found I was so busy all them time with exams and coursework but), extend your learning- perhaps in your long Summer Holiday of 2016, read some journals and articles, watch some TED talks on YouTube about Medicine, Universities relish in seeing a candidate go above and beyond the curriculum, yet you don't have to be concerned with this yet- just put it in your diary for summer! This summer, after your exams, also start looking at Work Experience for Medicine- this is vital, also join some societies in college, but that's too far in the future yet, think about GCSEs first!

    I couldn't possibly rate your GCSEs on difficulty- people find different aspects and basics of things in some subjects far more difficult than others do. I gained, and I was very surprised, 11 As and A*s at GCSE- I thought I failed them all because my stress and worry about doing well clouded any ability that I could've had. I do Biology and English and I know many who take Psychology and Chemistry A-level, here's the thing, all A-levels go up a notch- if they were the same level of GCSE then there would be no progression, the elements I find hardest in Biology is the style of exam compared to GCSE (questions are less memory based, more applying your skill, so say you learnt about photosynthesis and the function chloroplasts etc, the question may ask something in relation to this but not something that you've learnt necessarily out of a textbook- there is more thinking) and the vast detail of knowledge- as long as you keep organised, talk to teachers, use the learning resources of YouTube, Revision Guides, Teachers and the Internet websites like S-Cool, begin revision bit by bit, it'll be okay- there is no need to be concerned about A-level difficulty, if you're going to do them, just delve in and face it- everyone else with you is in the same boat and not everyone gets A********s first time, even the really clever guys.

    Good Luck with your GCSEs, do little bits and bobs here and there and don't panic- it should be challenging if you want these higher grades as Medicine is very competitive, but you have the same chance as everyone else, don't worry, just go for it. Also get the "easier" exams in the bag, many think RS is pointless, but I got an A* in this and it still serves as a good impression.

    Cheerio.
    Hi there, thank you so much for taking your time to give me this advice, it's really helpful. I go to a Catholic school so RS is a compulsory subject😁I revise about 5 hours Monday to Friday And about 6-7 hours Saturday and SundayDo you think that is enough or would more be required?Also did you do Double or Triple Science?And if I was to do work experience where should I apply?Which ways did you revise and find most effective?And which ways should I relax myself?Oh and one more (so sorry about all these questions)I have end of topic tests coming up, should I revise for them or just revise straight for GCSEs? I always think that these aren't useful and I should spend the time revising for the actual GCSEs instead of these end of topic test Thank you so much for taking your time out, I look forward to your reply
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    Hello,

    No problem- I'm procrastinating from doing my A-level work and some important applications, so I thought I should do something useful and reply!

    "I revise about 5 hours Monday to Friday And about 6-7 hours Saturday and Sunday: Do you think that is enough or would more be required?"

    Five hours Monday to Friday is great- even set to do just 1 hour a night (don't worry if you miss an evening because you're doing something else, it's not worth the stress) and maybe watch a 5 minute video from YouTube or read a quick page on BBC Bitesize on for example, let's say Chemistry so a short fuels/oils and hydrocarbons page- do this in a break at school on your phone or when you have a spare few minutes in the car or at home. Ensure to make your revision gradual, then increasing the frequency and duration of your revision sessions nearer the time to the exams, otherwise, honestly, the content for the exam can be so easily forgotten- keep it ticking over. Those weekend hours are also fine- don't tire yourself out though, keep this real.

    "Also did you do Double or Triple Science?"

    I did Triple Science which for my exam board was 3 more exams (9 Science in total)- don't worry if you don't take Triple- Double is absolutely fine- you don't have to have done Triple to do A-level Sciences, there are lot's of people in my class who just did the Core + Additional Science.

    "And if I was to do work experience where should I apply?"

    Don't do work experience yet- if it comes along then brilliant, but Summer/September 2016 may be best, but anyway, you can apply/ask your local hospital, find their contact details, call or send a polite email asking about Work Experience- some hospitals, like this one: http://inspiringcareers.imperial.nhs...rk-experience/ have work experience departments which have special contact. Just do your research, I'm sure your Sixth Form/College will help you and give you far better information than I can. Volunteering is always great too, this site https://do-it.org/ is great for these opportunities, however, don't worry about that yet.

    "Which ways did you revise and find most effective?"

    My revision was awful- yet I'll tell you what I should've done, do note that everyone finds more revision techniques more useful than others- just play around with various methods: Mind maps are great, Post-it notes of key terms/phrases/definitions are quick and not too challenging to write (stick these around your room/house for a constant visual reminder), use various resources like Bitesize and YouTube, Revision Guides and your class notes, attend Revision sessions if your school does this, maybe a designated notebook some of your revision- ensure to work on the areas you found most challenging (practicing the stuff you know isn't always the best thing to do), use colours and pictures, you could record yourself reading your notes or a revision guide and play it back to yourself when you're in the car on somewhere and my teachers nagged me always to do Past Papers- they help you become familiar with the styles of questions the exams poses (found on your exam board's website)- I wish I did more! Plus, remove all distractions- phone and laptop etc, if you need these for revision sources, just try and refrain from going onto the world of social media, it'll suck you in.

    "And which ways should I relax myself?"

    You'll relax when you know you've done some decent revision that day- satisfied with your efforts! Be sure to take breaks, this could literally be go for a walk (this is when intense revision starts nearer the Summer), watch your favourite programme, do some flipping baking, that's always the solution. OOOh also, make a revision playlist on Spotify (free)!

    "I have end of topic tests coming up, should I revise for them or just revise straight for GCSEs? I always think that these aren't useful and I should spend the time revising for the actual GCSEs instead of these end of topic?"

    Ahh I felt the same- even with mocks, I was like whatttt noo I've got real GCSEs soon, stop making me do thiss. But all in all, they are there for a reason- the end of topic tests will have elements in that will have a chance of appearing in your real exam so it's worth doing a bit of revision- however think of it as long term revision, so you may revise for doing your GCSEs and in doing so covered parts of your end of topic tests. If you find this particular topic easy and simple for you, perhaps use your time more wisely and study for an aspect that's not so strong.

    I hope this helps- don't stress out, just be prepared and always ask for help and your life is more than just grades- we're not exam machines but unfortunately to apparently have a future we have to be great at taking exams- I don't see how this is a good skill in life but oh wellll, ookkk, I really need to do some workkk now, lolllzlzll byeee!!

    No problem )
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    (Original post by notimeforthis)
    Hello,

    No problem- I'm procrastinating from doing my A-level work and some important applications, so I thought I should do something useful and reply!

    "I revise about 5 hours Monday to Friday And about 6-7 hours Saturday and Sunday: Do you think that is enough or would more be required?"

    Five hours Monday to Friday is great- even set to do just 1 hour a night (don't worry if you miss an evening because you're doing something else, it's not worth the stress) and maybe watch a 5 minute video from YouTube or read a quick page on BBC Bitesize on for example, let's say Chemistry so a short fuels/oils and hydrocarbons page- do this in a break at school on your phone or when you have a spare few minutes in the car or at home. Ensure to make your revision gradual, then increasing the frequency and duration of your revision sessions nearer the time to the exams, otherwise, honestly, the content for the exam can be so easily forgotten- keep it ticking over. Those weekend hours are also fine- don't tire yourself out though, keep this real.

    "Also did you do Double or Triple Science?"

    I did Triple Science which for my exam board was 3 more exams (9 Science in total)- don't worry if you don't take Triple- Double is absolutely fine- you don't have to have done Triple to do A-level Sciences, there are lot's of people in my class who just did the Core + Additional Science.

    "And if I was to do work experience where should I apply?"

    Don't do work experience yet- if it comes along then brilliant, but Summer/September 2016 may be best, but anyway, you can apply/ask your local hospital, find their contact details, call or send a polite email asking about Work Experience- some hospitals, like this one: http://inspiringcareers.imperial.nhs...rk-experience/ have work experience departments which have special contact. Just do your research, I'm sure your Sixth Form/College will help you and give you far better information than I can. Volunteering is always great too, this site https://do-it.org/ is great for these opportunities, however, don't worry about that yet.

    "Which ways did you revise and find most effective?"

    My revision was awful- yet I'll tell you what I should've done, do note that everyone finds more revision techniques more useful than others- just play around with various methods: Mind maps are great, Post-it notes of key terms/phrases/definitions are quick and not too challenging to write (stick these around your room/house for a constant visual reminder), use various resources like Bitesize and YouTube, Revision Guides and your class notes, attend Revision sessions if your school does this, maybe a designated notebook some of your revision- ensure to work on the areas you found most challenging (practicing the stuff you know isn't always the best thing to do), use colours and pictures, you could record yourself reading your notes or a revision guide and play it back to yourself when you're in the car on somewhere and my teachers nagged me always to do Past Papers- they help you become familiar with the styles of questions the exams poses (found on your exam board's website)- I wish I did more! Plus, remove all distractions- phone and laptop etc, if you need these for revision sources, just try and refrain from going onto the world of social media, it'll suck you in.

    "And which ways should I relax myself?"

    You'll relax when you know you've done some decent revision that day- satisfied with your efforts! Be sure to take breaks, this could literally be go for a walk (this is when intense revision starts nearer the Summer), watch your favourite programme, do some flipping baking, that's always the solution. OOOh also, make a revision playlist on Spotify (free)!

    "I have end of topic tests coming up, should I revise for them or just revise straight for GCSEs? I always think that these aren't useful and I should spend the time revising for the actual GCSEs instead of these end of topic?"

    Ahh I felt the same- even with mocks, I was like whatttt noo I've got real GCSEs soon, stop making me do thiss. But all in all, they are there for a reason- the end of topic tests will have elements in that will have a chance of appearing in your real exam so it's worth doing a bit of revision- however think of it as long term revision, so you may revise for doing your GCSEs and in doing so covered parts of your end of topic tests. If you find this particular topic easy and simple for you, perhaps use your time more wisely and study for an aspect that's not so strong.

    I hope this helps- don't stress out, just be prepared and always ask for help and your life is more than just grades- we're not exam machines but unfortunately to apparently have a future we have to be great at taking exams- I don't see how this is a good skill in life but oh wellll, ookkk, I really need to do some workkk now, lolllzlzll byeee!!

    No problem )
    Thank you so sooo much for allllllll this help, this is all helpful to me, And the advice is amazing, thank you so much for all this info, and I hope you good luck too for any of your exams coming up. Thank you again
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    (Original post by notimeforthis)
    Hello,

    No problem- I'm procrastinating from doing my A-level work and some important applications, so I thought I should do something useful and reply!

    "I revise about 5 hours Monday to Friday And about 6-7 hours Saturday and Sunday: Do you think that is enough or would more be required?"

    Five hours Monday to Friday is great- even set to do just 1 hour a night (don't worry if you miss an evening because you're doing something else, it's not worth the stress) and maybe watch a 5 minute video from YouTube or read a quick page on BBC Bitesize on for example, let's say Chemistry so a short fuels/oils and hydrocarbons page- do this in a break at school on your phone or when you have a spare few minutes in the car or at home. Ensure to make your revision gradual, then increasing the frequency and duration of your revision sessions nearer the time to the exams, otherwise, honestly, the content for the exam can be so easily forgotten- keep it ticking over. Those weekend hours are also fine- don't tire yourself out though, keep this real.

    "Also did you do Double or Triple Science?"

    I did Triple Science which for my exam board was 3 more exams (9 Science in total)- don't worry if you don't take Triple- Double is absolutely fine- you don't have to have done Triple to do A-level Sciences, there are lot's of people in my class who just did the Core + Additional Science.

    "And if I was to do work experience where should I apply?"

    Don't do work experience yet- if it comes along then brilliant, but Summer/September 2016 may be best, but anyway, you can apply/ask your local hospital, find their contact details, call or send a polite email asking about Work Experience- some hospitals, like this one: http://inspiringcareers.imperial.nhs...rk-experience/ have work experience departments which have special contact. Just do your research, I'm sure your Sixth Form/College will help you and give you far better information than I can. Volunteering is always great too, this site https://do-it.org/ is great for these opportunities, however, don't worry about that yet.

    "Which ways did you revise and find most effective?"

    My revision was awful- yet I'll tell you what I should've done, do note that everyone finds more revision techniques more useful than others- just play around with various methods: Mind maps are great, Post-it notes of key terms/phrases/definitions are quick and not too challenging to write (stick these around your room/house for a constant visual reminder), use various resources like Bitesize and YouTube, Revision Guides and your class notes, attend Revision sessions if your school does this, maybe a designated notebook some of your revision- ensure to work on the areas you found most challenging (practicing the stuff you know isn't always the best thing to do), use colours and pictures, you could record yourself reading your notes or a revision guide and play it back to yourself when you're in the car on somewhere and my teachers nagged me always to do Past Papers- they help you become familiar with the styles of questions the exams poses (found on your exam board's website)- I wish I did more! Plus, remove all distractions- phone and laptop etc, if you need these for revision sources, just try and refrain from going onto the world of social media, it'll suck you in.

    "And which ways should I relax myself?"

    You'll relax when you know you've done some decent revision that day- satisfied with your efforts! Be sure to take breaks, this could literally be go for a walk (this is when intense revision starts nearer the Summer), watch your favourite programme, do some flipping baking, that's always the solution. OOOh also, make a revision playlist on Spotify (free)!

    "I have end of topic tests coming up, should I revise for them or just revise straight for GCSEs? I always think that these aren't useful and I should spend the time revising for the actual GCSEs instead of these end of topic?"

    Ahh I felt the same- even with mocks, I was like whatttt noo I've got real GCSEs soon, stop making me do thiss. But all in all, they are there for a reason- the end of topic tests will have elements in that will have a chance of appearing in your real exam so it's worth doing a bit of revision- however think of it as long term revision, so you may revise for doing your GCSEs and in doing so covered parts of your end of topic tests. If you find this particular topic easy and simple for you, perhaps use your time more wisely and study for an aspect that's not so strong.

    I hope this helps- don't stress out, just be prepared and always ask for help and your life is more than just grades- we're not exam machines but unfortunately to apparently have a future we have to be great at taking exams- I don't see how this is a good skill in life but oh wellll, ookkk, I really need to do some workkk now, lolllzlzll byeee!!

    No problem )

    Hi there, I wanted to ask, how did u revise for physics
    I honestly don't know what is workin for me, I've tried everything, mind maps, flash cards, all that but I still don't know,
    Help please!!
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    Hello,

    I used CGP revision guides and revised every page- not necessarily something I'd recommend/is healthy but it helped me grasp a good understanding as it's worded so nicely: do you have one of these- what's your exam board also?

    I also used YouTube videos- typing in a topic title and there were often tutorials from really good teachers on there which I'd watch and repeat etc.

    You could also write the formulas/equations that you need to have an understanding of (possibly not memorize as these may be on the exam paper, but I'm not sure) on Post-It sticky notes and place them all around your room/house.

    Happy to help- make sure you ask your teachers for tips too, some do know best!
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    I found this one quite useful; there really is a wide range available though: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqb...Xw9Il7sBVG3_bw
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    (Original post by Emmasaleem1304)
    So I'm in year 11 At the moment about to do my GCSEs. My main aim is to become a doctor and for that you need to do a Medicine degree.So in my mocks, which were in November I gotEnglish - C
    Maths - C
    Core Science - B
    Additional science- C (we only did B4 C4 P4 exams, not the 5 and 6's)
    RS - C
    History - C
    Business studies - C
    Leisure and tourism - B

    So as you know, to get into medicine you have to have at least 7 GCSEs, A grade, and for A levels you need to have AAA (including Biology and Chemistry as an A level)I would really like to do medicine But I'm not sure if I will be able to reach All A's, or if I'm even capable enough for that. So my questions are
    1) would i really be able to achieveall A's
    2) are GCSE's really as hard as teachers and people make them out as3) how hard would you rate my GCSE subjects (Easy, Medium, Hard)
    4) how hard is Chemistry as an A level5) how hard is Biology as an A level 6)how hard is pschology as an A level7)how hard is English Language as an A level (Some other notes: we have recently done a maths mock, just at the start of January and I got a B in that, I also have done a history GCSE question which I got an A* in, English literature I have got a B in a controlled assessment we have done just a while back, I got a B in my recent RE test, I was 1 mark off an A arghhh!!!!!)
    Haha, this is a bit of a coincidence; I have an offer for med and my A levels are Bio, Chem and Psych (did Eng Lit AS and dropped it).

    1) Sure if you put your mind to it, its mainly a case of practising. Also, consider the fact that school's tend to make the mocks a little bit harder than the actual thing.
    2) In hindsight they were fairly easy (but still stressful), however when I was in your position they were the hardest thing I'd ever done; it's all a matter of perspective.
    3) I'd say maybe physics and chem are slightly harder, and the rest are about the same, but again it's a matter of perspective - I'm awful at maths so that was hard for me but others found it very easy, it depends on what you're naturally good at and what you enjoy.
    4) Chemistry is renowned for being a toughie, but again, it depends. A lot of it is just getting your head around the concepts, once you've done that the rest sort of fits into place. It's one of those subjects where if you get it first time round - great, otherwise you'll have to go away and check out a load of different sources until you get the hang of it. There's also a bit of memorisation to do (eg reactants, conditions) but it's not too bad.
    5) Biology isn't particularly hard in terms of the subject matter itself, however there is a large volume of things to learn. Bio is literally just memorising a textbook and regurgitating appropriate bits of knowledge in the exam.
    6) Psych is a bit of a mix b/w Bio and English. Again it's a lot of memorising and regurgitating, but you have to write a couple of essays as well - basically writing out everything you memorised in a PQE-ish structure.
    7) Can't comment on English Lang from experience, but from what I've heard, it's not too bad.
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    (Original post by notimeforthis)
    I found this one quite useful; there really is a wide range available though: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqb...Xw9Il7sBVG3_bw

    Ahh thank you for this info, I had my P5 exam and I actually got an A* in that exam!!! I was so pleased
    I just wanted to ask, as you are so helpful, that I have a maths mock exam on the 23rd of Feb, so I am revising for that
    But do you think it's okay if I just have one day of the week, which is normally Friday's for me, where I just relax myself and not really do any revison.
    I normally go to bed at 12am on weekdays due to revison and wake up at 7am
    Which leads me to being very tired so by the end of the week I hardly have any energy so I take one day off
    But I don't know if I'm right by doing this
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    Hello,

    Well done- that's so good and it's not even exam season yet and you're getting A*s!

    I hope the maths revising is going well (your revision motivation is phenomenal, I really need to get to your standard!)- I found past papers were excellent for this, I read an educational psychology article on revision techniques, Dunlosky stated that his research in 2013 concluded to an extent that retrieval and distributed practice was the most highly effective- so in your terms, this means past papers... HOWEVER, he also noted that this should be exercised in an order, i.e. the facts and content base must me learnt to a certain degree first- e.g. understand how stem and leafs or quadratic equations work (this is just an example asodfja;sldkjf) then have a go at the past paper.

    Anyway, I totally digress...

    If you find your workload and revision timetable (considering you're quite ahead of the game with revision compared to other GCSE students... yet please, this is brilliant) suiting you then keep it up but as you are getting tired, although this can illustrate that you've done work it is also signalling that you might be overworking- remember, if you're getting tired now, it'll be difficult to sustain your energy and focus when it comes to the crucial real exams. My advice is that, of course if it suits you take a day off but as well as this, honestly, I'd go to bed earlier- 12 is too late for GCSE students taking exams- I used to (still do) go to bed too late and I became very stressed and susceptible to feeling ill when it came to the exams. The preparation you are doing is absolutely fantastic (keep it up but don't worry if you feel like having a day off/ cutting down on the hours you do- doing too much will have more negative effects) and if you feel like doing it then go for it but also take note of what your body is telling you!

    Gahh, it's hard to get a balance- just work hard, revise but also rest your brain!

    Hope this helps, this is only my opinion also so you don't have to take it at all.
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    (Original post by notimeforthis)
    Hello,

    Well done- that's so good and it's not even exam season yet and you're getting A*s!

    I hope the maths revising is going well (your revision motivation is phenomenal, I really need to get to your standard!)- I found past papers were excellent for this, I read an educational psychology article on revision techniques, Dunlosky stated that his research in 2013 concluded to an extent that retrieval and distributed practice was the most highly effective- so in your terms, this means past papers... HOWEVER, he also noted that this should be exercised in an order, i.e. the facts and content base must me learnt to a certain degree first- e.g. understand how stem and leafs or quadratic equations work (this is just an example asodfja;sldkjf) then have a go at the past paper.

    Anyway, I totally digress...

    If you find your workload and revision timetable (considering you're quite ahead of the game with revision compared to other GCSE students... yet please, this is brilliant) suiting you then keep it up but as you are getting tired, although this can illustrate that you've done work it is also signalling that you might be overworking- remember, if you're getting tired now, it'll be difficult to sustain your energy and focus when it comes to the crucial real exams. My advice is that, of course if it suits you take a day off but as well as this, honestly, I'd go to bed earlier- 12 is too late for GCSE students taking exams- I used to (still do) go to bed too late and I became very stressed and susceptible to feeling ill when it came to the exams. The preparation you are doing is absolutely fantastic (keep it up but don't worry if you feel like having a day off/ cutting down on the hours you do- doing too much will have more negative effects) and if you feel like doing it then go for it but also take note of what your body is telling you!

    Gahh, it's hard to get a balance- just work hard, revise but also rest your brain!

    Hope this helps, this is only my opinion also so you don't have to take it at all.

    Hi there. Oh thank you haha
    But I have an issue as the moment. My revision motivation is going down and im worried
    I basically have not revised since Friday so 3 days now and I have a maths exam next Tuesday
    So I will hopefully start revising tomorrow but do you think I should be worrying about missing 3 days of revision so much or do I need to calm down?
    I always feel like that by missing these few days I will totally fail my exams I don't know how to get rid of this thought
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    (Original post by Emmasaleem1304)
    Hi there. Oh thank you haha
    But I have an issue as the moment. My revision motivation is going down and im worried
    I basically have not revised since Friday so 3 days now and I have a maths exam next Tuesday
    So I will hopefully start revising tomorrow but do you think I should be worrying about missing 3 days of revision so much or do I need to calm down?
    I always feel like that by missing these few days I will totally fail my exams I don't know how to get rid of this thought
    This is 100% me; I'm always stressing about the fact that I'm not revising and the fact that I don't deserve to do well or get a good result if I'm not putting effort it... but really what's the point of worrying- the fact that you're concerned shows you're conscientious and are aware of what it takes, yet all you can do is try your best, if you miss a few days, try not to dwell on it because that's gone and don't let that make you calculate ambitious revision targets for the next day e.g. oh omggg I haven't revised for 3 days so tomorrow I'll get up at 6 am and do 12 hours revision... seriously, this doesn't work- the prospect of having that almighty burden makes everything way more inefficient, just be like oh well let's do 2/3 hours revision tommorow and half a maths past paper (depending on school and other commitments that come first) on a particular topic you find you need to get your head around and enjoy the rest of your day and stay healthy- go out with friends after revision or do something to replenish your brain!

    Motivation is fundamental but I'm rubbish at it- I also spent more time concerned/complaining about revising than actually doing it which exacerbates/complicates the issue of doing it in the first place- don't feel guilty or rubbish about missing days, there's nothing you can do, just remember to keep things ticking over (3 days is absolutely fine for you) and not reach your peak then feel exhausted by the time real exams come around.

    You're doing fine, no need to worryyyy- even watch a 5 minute YouTube video- this counts as an element of revision which doesn't take that much motivation.
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    (Original post by notimeforthis)
    This is 100% me; I'm always stressing about the fact that I'm not revising and the fact that I don't deserve to do well or get a good result if I'm not putting effort it... but really what's the point of worrying- the fact that you're concerned shows you're conscientious and are aware of what it takes, yet all you can do is try your best, if you miss a few days, try not to dwell on it because that's gone and don't let that make you calculate ambitious revision targets for the next day e.g. oh omggg I haven't revised for 3 days so tomorrow I'll get up at 6 am and do 12 hours revision... seriously, this doesn't work- the prospect of having that almighty burden makes everything way more inefficient, just be like oh well let's do 2/3 hours revision tommorow and half a maths past paper (depending on school and other commitments that come first) on a particular topic you find you need to get your head around and enjoy the rest of your day and stay healthy- go out with friends after revision or do something to replenish your brain!

    Motivation is fundamental but I'm rubbish at it- I also spent more time concerned/complaining about revising than actually doing it which exacerbates/complicates the issue of doing it in the first place- don't feel guilty or rubbish about missing days, there's nothing you can do, just remember to keep things ticking over (3 days is absolutely fine for you) and not reach your peak then feel exhausted by the time real exams come around.

    You're doing fine, no need to worryyyy- even watch a 5 minute YouTube video- this counts as an element of revision which doesn't take that much motivation.

    Aaaahhhhhhhhhh I'm so worrrrrieeedddd

    So as u already know I have a maths mock exam next Tuesday so the 23rd, and I haven't revised at all!!!! I've had a 4 day holiday in London n just got back home and I have not touched one single book
    I don't know what to do
    I'm going to failllll
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    (Original post by Emmasaleem1304)
    Aaaahhhhhhhhhh I'm so worrrrrieeedddd

    So as u already know I have a maths mock exam next Tuesday so the 23rd, and I haven't revised at all!!!! I've had a 4 day holiday in London n just got back home and I have not touched one single book
    I don't know what to do
    I'm going to failllll
    Yesssssss- it's fine, holidays are good- well done, good choice, you get memories, you explore the world, diversely educate your mind and realise it's more than just exams- I've missed out on so much by worrying about exams, yes they're kinda useful but in perspective it's just like ughh. Have a flick through your exercise book, literally familiarise yourself with the topics and maybe have a go at answering a couple of questions on a past paper/if you have a revision book, look through that or just not and enjoy your half term... and don't stress- no need to study for every hour from now until then, no point, not worthhh itttt and you'll spend more time worrying about the mound of revision your mind is telling you to do, nonono, keep it little- break it up into teeny chunks.

    I doubt you'll fail, you'll surprise yourself... and if so, never mind, what's going to happen, literally nothing- it's a mock: yes it can demonstrate where you are (not that exams always accurately measure your capability but whatever) in maths- but that's at the moment, the real ones aren't here yet and you'll be able to precisely assess what you need to work on from this set of mocks in order to improve your performance for you GCSEs.

    Just go in focused but relaxed and not tireddddd- remember your ruler etc, v.useful.
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    (Original post by notimeforthis)
    Yesssssss- it's fine, holidays are good- well done, good choice, you get memories, you explore the world, diversely educate your mind and realise it's more than just exams- I've missed out on so much by worrying about exams, yes they're kinda useful but in perspective it's just like ughh. Have a flick through your exercise book, literally familiarise yourself with the topics and maybe have a go at answering a couple of questions on a past paper/if you have a revision book, look through that or just not and enjoy your half term... and don't stress- no need to study for every hour from now until then, no point, not worthhh itttt and you'll spend more time worrying about the mound of revision your mind is telling you to do, nonono, keep it little- break it up into teeny chunks.

    I doubt you'll fail, you'll surprise yourself... and if so, never mind, what's going to happen, literally nothing- it's a mock: yes it can demonstrate where you are (not that exams always accurately measure your capability but whatever) in maths- but that's at the moment, the real ones aren't here yet and you'll be able to precisely assess what you need to work on from this set of mocks in order to improve your performance for you GCSEs.

    Just go in focused but relaxed and not tireddddd- remember your ruler etc, v.useful.

    Hi there. Sorry I havnt been able to reply for so long, I'm so busy hardly any free time left. I'm starting to feel negative and doubting myself for GCSEs. As you know I want to get straight A/A* but I'm starting to doubt myself because I'm not those naturally clever people, I have to try a lot to get good grades
    Could I ask you to rank my subjects on how hard you found them?
    Eng language
    Eng literature
    Maths
    Core science
    Addtional science
    Religious Studies
    History
    Business Studies
    Leisure and Tourism
 
 
 
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