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Would you switch jobs and take a pay cut? Watch

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    I understand that many here probably aren't in a position to do so, or may not have the experience to understand this situation - but:

    If you were extremely unhappy in your current full-time role, would you consider accepting an offer elsewhere where you'll definitely be happier but the salary would be a lot less?

    Assuming:

    - The new salary still covers all your bills, taxes, travel and living costs etc. with a bit leftover.
    - It's a huge pay cut, approximately 10K - 15K.
    - You've exhausted all other options e.g. other interviews and offers and found the right one where you'll fit in nicely and genuinely enjoy the work you do + room to progress in your role rapidly.
    - You're single with no children, and therefore aren't required to discuss with your partner.

    Would you go for it? If so, what would be some other deciding factors e.g. about the company itself and its future?

    If not, why not (other than the pay cut)?

    Thanks.
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    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    I understand that many here probably aren't in a position to do so, or may not have the experience to understand this situation - but:

    If you were extremely unhappy in your current full-time role, would you consider accepting an offer elsewhere where you'll definitely be happier but the salary would be a lot less?

    Assuming:

    - The new salary still covers all your bills, taxes, travel and living costs etc. with a bit leftover.
    - It's a huge pay cut, approximately 10K - 15K.
    - You've exhausted all other options e.g. other interviews and offers and found the right one where you'll fit in nicely and genuinely enjoy the work you do + room to progress in your role rapidly.
    - You're single with no children, and therefore aren't required to discuss with your partner.

    Would you go for it? If so, what would be some other deciding factors e.g. about the company itself and its future?

    If not, why not (other than the pay cut)?

    Thanks.
    I would absolutely take a pay cut, and have done so recently because I did not enjoy what I was doing. This said, whether I would take that large of a cut would depend on whether or not I had anything meaningful to do with the additional money and just how miserable I was. For example, if I was hoping to get a sizable deposit together for a mortgage I would be tempted to put up with a job I hated until I could save the amount I needed (and possibly had an agreement in place). If that extra money is just being used to fund a more extravagant lifestyle purely because you have the ability to do so then I would absolutely take that pay cut if I thought it would vastly improve my working life. We spend so much time working that it borders on moronic not to seek the most agreeable position you can.

    If career progression in general is important to you then it would be advisable to consider the company's future, but I wouldn't consider this an enormously important point. While you don't want to appear flaky on your CV, a willingness to switch roles in your early career dramatically increases your chances of finding the right fir for you which will obviously be more profitable in the long-run.

    It is difficult to advise beyond this as no doubt our motivations are different, but this is my initial reaction. Life is too short to choose to be unhappy.
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    I didn't take a pay cut to the levels of that, but I lost out in probably 2.5k over the course of the year due to bonuses in my old company.

    I didn't give it a second thought. They offered me the top of their range without quibbling and their hours are amazingly flexible. The people I work with are lovely and I'm now looking forward to an actual career (tax accountant). Then again, they are funding all my training for ATT and CTA so I'll more than make up my pay cut with those costs alone.

    Job satisfaction and career progression are more important to me than salary. As long as I have enough for my bills (as I have a mortgage now) and a bit of fun money I'd take the cut. You spend so much of your time at work so I'm going to make sure it's enjoyable!
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    i recently did this at the start of the year.
    after being in a company 3 years after graduating and having a degree in relevant field but there was no progression, I tried within the company but kept getting knocked back. Lots of things changed in the company in my last year there but still no progression opportunities and unfortunately I ended up being bullied by my supervisor and manager. I hated the environment. i couldn't flourish and constantly felt my jobs was on the line. the 3 of my colleagues in my department we got on well, they were also looking for other employment.
    I grew up wanting to be a teacher, but after getting my under grad degree got that job applied for the pgde once and got rejected it knocked my confidence and I was to scared to apply again. But I always kept going back to the idea of teaching as an option.
    The end of last year after applying I got offered a job as a classroom assistant. It was a great way for me to experience what it might be like to be a teacher. It's part time (my old job was full time) and I also don;t get paid during the school holidays so I took about a 6000 pound pay drop (not as much as you would be) but my salary went from "bad" to "tragic" but I went for it.
    i'm glad i did. I don't particularly like my new job but I had to do it in order to figure out that perhaps teaching isn't the career for me.

    If you know or think you'll be happier and there's even the slightest bit of evidence to support taking this step forward. I say go for it. You said yourself you can afford to (no commitments etc). Otherwise you could be in this position 5-10 years down the line and do you want to make that decision then? Maybe your circumstances won't allow you to.

    Is this going to be a complete change of career?
 
 
 
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