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    So.

    I would really like to apply for Medicine in the next year or so once I've managed to get my head fully around the admission process!

    I have always been fascinated by medicine/surgery from about 4 years old. However, at school I didn't do outstandingly in my GCSEs and my A Level grades were definitely not to a standard suitable for an application to Med School. My parents also would never have been able to afford to send me to university either.

    11 years on, I have a job in the NHS as a midwife, I qualified with a first class degree after finding out I was dyslexic in my second undergraduate year.

    I would still love to apply for medicine as a second degree.

    I do have a couple of queries which I will share and ask for advice/opinion as to the next steps.

    I am 27 years old and although I am aware there are older candidates that will be applying, I do feel concerned that this may not be a good time to apply as I wonder if I was to meet someone and want a family, my childbearing years may likely clash with medical training-What are the experiences of others in this situation? Is it possible to combine studies with this?

    Finances-I am trying desperately to clear the outstanding debts that I have from University. I have had a student loan already for my previous degree and I can't see how I can fund tuition fees (may be able to get a TF loan as never took one out before) and living costs for the duration of the training. What do the banks offer for prospective medical students-is there any other help for candidates who cannot rely on family support?

    Am I eligible given what I have mentioned of my education history here? I am very aware of the current pressures in the NHS from talking with my colleagues and I am also aware how extremely competitive medical school places are becoming. Anyone reading this who would know-what are your thoughts and what would you suggest is realistic? The doctors I work with have been very supportive and suggested I would have no problem?

    I keep coming back to the thought of applying again and again-I think it is time to give it my best shot and hope I am successful. I have spent far too many years thinking about this! I just hope I can get the support and funding I need to make this dream a reality.

    Thanks for reading!
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    Hi

    You need to look into the graduate only accelerated medicine degrees. These are fully funded by student loans and the NHS regardless of how many degrees you have, if you have loan outstanding etc.

    All you need to pay is a £3k contribution in year one. The rest is funded and you get ~£8k maintenance loan.

    This is a thread for people thinking of applying in Sept for 2017 entry:

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3047657

    (Original post by Littlestar121)
    So.

    I would really like to apply for Medicine in the next year or so once I've managed to get my head fully around the admission process!

    I have always been fascinated by medicine/surgery from about 4 years old. However, at school I didn't do outstandingly in my GCSEs and my A Level grades were definitely not to a standard suitable for an application to Med School. My parents also would never have been able to afford to send me to university either.

    11 years on, I have a job in the NHS as a midwife, I qualified with a first class degree after finding out I was dyslexic in my second undergraduate year.

    I would still love to apply for medicine as a second degree.

    I do have a couple of queries which I will share and ask for advice/opinion as to the next steps.

    I am 27 years old and although I am aware there are older candidates that will be applying, I do feel concerned that this may not be a good time to apply as I wonder if I was to meet someone and want a family, my childbearing years may likely clash with medical training-What are the experiences of others in this situation? Is it possible to combine studies with this?

    Finances-I am trying desperately to clear the outstanding debts that I have from University. I have had a student loan already for my previous degree and I can't see how I can fund tuition fees (may be able to get a TF loan as never took one out before) and living costs for the duration of the training. What do the banks offer for prospective medical students-is there any other help for candidates who cannot rely on family support?

    Am I eligible given what I have mentioned of my education history here? I am very aware of the current pressures in the NHS from talking with my colleagues and I am also aware how extremely competitive medical school places are becoming. Anyone reading this who would know-what are your thoughts and what would you suggest is realistic? The doctors I work with have been very supportive and suggested I would have no problem?

    I keep coming back to the thought of applying again and again-I think it is time to give it my best shot and hope I am successful. I have spent far too many years thinking about this! I just hope I can get the support and funding I need to make this dream a reality.

    Thanks for reading!
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    27 is not too old to start medical school. You still have 40+ working years left. Having kids makes things more complicated but you wouldn't be the first medical student or junior doctor to be in that position. Life/jobs/training will fit around them if/when the situation arises. This would usually mean taking 6-12 months "out" of studying/training but so what? There are no prizes for being a consultant before age 40.

    Graduate entry programmes are where you need to be as they are shorter (4 years) and are currently financed (fees paid and a means-tested maintenance loan). I don't know how the disappearance of healthcare student bursaries has affected this arrangement - perhaps others can clarify?

    Medical school is competitive. You might not get in the first year you apply but you won't get in at all if you don't apply. Although you have lots of hospital experience as a midwife, I'd still try to expand your experience by shadowing doctors (including non-obstetric docs), spending a few days with a GP, etc etc. This will help you see things from a medical perspective and show that you are serious about your application.

    Some medical schools are very "academic" and will probably prioritise pure science degrees whereas others will value your previous healthcare experience. Leicester springs to mind as a medical school in the latter category - their course used to only be open to applicants with vocational healthcare degrees (nursing, physio, midwifery).
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    27 is not too old to start medical school. You still have 40+ working years left. Having kids makes things more complicated but you wouldn't be the first medical student or junior doctor to be in that position. Life/jobs/training will fit around them if/when the situation arises. This would usually mean taking 6-12 months "out" of studying/training but so what? There are no prizes for being a consultant before age 40.

    Graduate entry programmes are where you need to be as they are shorter (4 years) and are currently financed (fees paid and a means-tested maintenance loan). I don't know how the disappearance of healthcare student bursaries has affected this arrangement - perhaps others can clarify?

    Medical school is competitive. You might not get in the first year you apply but you won't get in at all if you don't apply. Although you have lots of hospital experience as a midwife, I'd still try to expand your experience by shadowing doctors (including non-obstetric docs), spending a few days with a GP, etc etc. This will help you see things from a medical perspective and show that you are serious about your application.

    Some medical schools are very "academic" and will probably prioritise pure science degrees whereas others will value your previous healthcare experience. Leicester springs to mind as a medical school in the latter category - their course used to only be open to applicants with vocational healthcare degrees (nursing, physio, midwifery).
    This is all really good advice, but Leicester stopped running their graduate course 2 years ago sadly!

    There are plenty of places open to the op though, but some require certain a levels/ GCSEs so just do your research and apply sensibly! Good luck!


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