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Difference in working out relative atomic mass and relative isotopic mass? watch

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    I'm starting all the way from the beginning again and want to be precise in my notes.

    I know the difference in meaning: RAM is weighted mean mass compared with 1/12th mass of carbon 12 and RIM is weighted mean mass of an isotope compared with 1/12th of the mass of an atom of carbon 12... right?

    But the working out is very similar, as in they both follow the same working out method pretty much:
    (x)+(x)
    ____
    (x)+(x)
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    Someone, perhaps charco, please correct me if I'm wrong but I doubt you'd have to work out the relative isotopic mass. The RIM is given to you to find the relative atomic mass.

    I hope this helps
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    (Original post by Kvothe the arcane)
    Someone, perhaps charco, please correct me if I'm wrong but I doubt you'd have to work out the relative isotopic mass. The RIM is given to you to find the relative atomic mass.

    I hope this helps
    THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    i can't thank you enough! I wouldn't continue my notes until I didn't have an answer! I checked my past exam questions and like you said I'd been given the RIM and then asked to work out the RAM.
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    (Original post by Kvothe the arcane)
    Someone, perhaps charco, please correct me if I'm wrong but I doubt you'd have to work out the relative isotopic mass. The RIM is given to you to find the relative atomic mass.

    I hope this helps
    Isotopes have a relative mass (of course) - they cannot have a relative isotopic mass per isotope, that just makes no sense.

    Each individual isotope has a RIM
    The element has a RAM based on the natural abundances of the isotopes.
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    (Original post by charco)
    Isotopes have a relative mass (of course) - they cannot have a relative isotopic mass per isotope, that just makes no sense.

    Each individual isotope has a RIM
    The element has a RAM based on the natural abundances of the isotopes.
    I don't disagree with you.
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    What year r u guys in?


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    (Original post by Kvothe the arcane)
    I don't disagree with you.
    I know - I only answered because you asked for confirmation ...
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    (Original post by charco)
    Isotopes have a relative mass (of course) - they cannot have a relative isotopic mass per isotope, that just makes no sense.

    Each individual isotope has a RIM
    The element has a RAM based on the natural abundances of the isotopes.
    I'm kinda confused again on the part where you say isotopes can't have a RIM per isotopes but each individual isotope has a RIM. what do you mean?
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    (Original post by Someoneanyone)
    I'm kinda confused again on the part where you say isotopes can't have a RIM per isotopes but each individual isotope has a RIM. what do you mean?
    An isotope is a particle. It has a specific mass. This can be expressed as a relative mass, but the same isotope ALWAYS has the same mass. There can be no such thing as an 'average' isotope mass.
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    (Original post by charco)
    An isotope is a particle. It has a specific mass. This can be expressed as a relative mass, but the same isotope ALWAYS has the same mass. There can be no such thing as an 'average' isotope mass.
    okay i guess, thanks, i think i know what i need to now
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    (Original post by Usman19999)
    What year r u guys in?


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    Year 12
 
 
 
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