Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Difference in working out relative atomic mass and relative isotopic mass? Watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I'm starting all the way from the beginning again and want to be precise in my notes.

    I know the difference in meaning: RAM is weighted mean mass compared with 1/12th mass of carbon 12 and RIM is weighted mean mass of an isotope compared with 1/12th of the mass of an atom of carbon 12... right?

    But the working out is very similar, as in they both follow the same working out method pretty much:
    (x)+(x)
    ____
    (x)+(x)
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    • Reporter Team
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Someone, perhaps charco, please correct me if I'm wrong but I doubt you'd have to work out the relative isotopic mass. The RIM is given to you to find the relative atomic mass.

    I hope this helps
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kvothe the arcane)
    Someone, perhaps charco, please correct me if I'm wrong but I doubt you'd have to work out the relative isotopic mass. The RIM is given to you to find the relative atomic mass.

    I hope this helps
    THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    i can't thank you enough! I wouldn't continue my notes until I didn't have an answer! I checked my past exam questions and like you said I'd been given the RIM and then asked to work out the RAM.
    • Community Assistant
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kvothe the arcane)
    Someone, perhaps charco, please correct me if I'm wrong but I doubt you'd have to work out the relative isotopic mass. The RIM is given to you to find the relative atomic mass.

    I hope this helps
    Isotopes have a relative mass (of course) - they cannot have a relative isotopic mass per isotope, that just makes no sense.

    Each individual isotope has a RIM
    The element has a RAM based on the natural abundances of the isotopes.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    • Reporter Team
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by charco)
    Isotopes have a relative mass (of course) - they cannot have a relative isotopic mass per isotope, that just makes no sense.

    Each individual isotope has a RIM
    The element has a RAM based on the natural abundances of the isotopes.
    I don't disagree with you.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    What year r u guys in?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Community Assistant
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kvothe the arcane)
    I don't disagree with you.
    I know - I only answered because you asked for confirmation ...
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by charco)
    Isotopes have a relative mass (of course) - they cannot have a relative isotopic mass per isotope, that just makes no sense.

    Each individual isotope has a RIM
    The element has a RAM based on the natural abundances of the isotopes.
    I'm kinda confused again on the part where you say isotopes can't have a RIM per isotopes but each individual isotope has a RIM. what do you mean?
    • Community Assistant
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Someoneanyone)
    I'm kinda confused again on the part where you say isotopes can't have a RIM per isotopes but each individual isotope has a RIM. what do you mean?
    An isotope is a particle. It has a specific mass. This can be expressed as a relative mass, but the same isotope ALWAYS has the same mass. There can be no such thing as an 'average' isotope mass.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by charco)
    An isotope is a particle. It has a specific mass. This can be expressed as a relative mass, but the same isotope ALWAYS has the same mass. There can be no such thing as an 'average' isotope mass.
    okay i guess, thanks, i think i know what i need to now
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Usman19999)
    What year r u guys in?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Year 12
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    How are your GCSEs going so far?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.